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EXPLORE
October 14, 2011
Voters in Laurel's Nov. 1 city elections have more ways to cast their ballots, and the city has adopted new voting machines that will make counting the different ballots quicker and easier. Kimberley Rau, clerk to the Laurel Board of Election Supervisors, said the new ELECTronic 1242 voting machines were adopted by Hyattsville with such success that Bowie, Greenbelt and now Laurel have followed suit. The big advantage with the new machines, Rau said, is that they have an optical scanner so paper ballots, which include absentee, provisional and early voting ballots, can be fed into the machine to be scanned and counted.
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NEWS
October 25, 2013
Voters can see how the city's electronic voting machine system operates at a demonstration next week. The system will be used for the upcoming City Council elections. Members of the Board of Election Supervisors will demonstrate the system on Thursday, Oct. 31 from noon to 4 p.m. in the council chambers at the Laurel Municipal Center, 8103 Sandy Spring Road. City officials described the system, known as ELECTronic 1242, as being a direct-recording system that is self-contained.
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NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | February 24, 2007
The voting machines used in the disputed congressional election in Sarasota, Fla., worked properly despite an unusually high number of blank ballots and widespread complaints that votes were lost, Florida officials said yesterday. After conducting a test election and inspecting the computer codes running the touch-screen voting machines, the state audit concluded that "there is no evidence that the results are in error." The audit, however, suggested ballot design might have led to voter confusion in the race between Republican Vern Buchanan and Democrat Christine Jennings.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Maryland continues to operate one of the least reliable, least credible election systems in the nation. How so? Because we vote using a paperless election system which fails to allow either for independent recounting or independent auditing. Our touch screen system has no way of uncovering and correcting either errors or fraud. Some day a machine in a Western Maryland precinct will report 100 percent of its votes going to Democrats. Or a Baltimore City machine will give all of its votes to Republican candidates.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is proposing to spend an additional $28.5 million on optical-scan voting machines for this year's elections and lesser amounts in new expenditures for local road projects and health care. The new spending is contained in a $59.5 million supplemental budget the governor released late yesterday, just as the legislative session enters its final two weeks and senators and delegates are already working to mold budget legislation. "This supplemental budget provides resources to secure Maryland's election system with optical-scan voting machines and also makes critical investments in health care," Ehrlich said in a statement.
NEWS
By Bob Mahlburg and Bob Mahlburg,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 30, 2004
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - A coalition of groups called yesterday on Gov. Jeb Bush to order a statewide study of the August primary election to make sure voting systems work for November's presidential vote. Florida is a key battleground and problems have been found with a type of electronic voting machine used by 11 of its 67 counties, including some in central and South Florida. "The buck stops with Gov. Jeb. Bush," said Sandy Wayland, of the Miami-Dade Election Reform Coalition. "He can either be a leader in election reform or he can stick his head in the sand and do nothing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | January 23, 1995
Baltimore County's election administrator says she wants to scrap the county's Cold War-era voting machines and join the computer age in time for the March 1996 presidential primary.Doris Suter is proposing that the county buy an Op-Tech III Eagle computer voting system similar to those used by 10 Maryland counties, including Anne Arundel, Harford, Howard and Carroll."I'm definitely recommending it," Mrs. Suter said.The new system was demonstrated Tuesday for the County Council.Besides simplifying storage and maintenance, the system would count the votes faster on election night and allow the county to reduce the number of election judges from2,100 to 1,700, she said.
NEWS
December 6, 2000
IT CAN'T HAPPEN here? Think again. Florida's vote-counting snafu in the presidential election could well have occurred in Maryland. Indeed, 2,500 Montgomery County citizens, using the same punch-card ballots that prompted the Florida flap, punched through two chads for presidential candidates on Nov. 7, thus invalidating their votes. If the contest in Maryland had been tight, these "overvotes" could have made a difference. How Maryland would handle a recount could be just as controversial as what has happened in Florida.
NEWS
By LYN BACKE | May 10, 1993
The first candidates have announced. The first posters have appeared on lawns.Tonight, Annapolis politicians will take another step closer to the election when they decide what kind of voting machines to use.The City Council will consider whether to use cheaper, old-fashioned voting machines this year or new, but more expensive, computerized models.The council also is scheduled to vote on waiving parking fees for business owners and developers on West Street. Business owners have complained that they are unable to pay the fees for providing off-street parking because the area is still suffering the aftereffects of the recession.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
Baltimore County is fighting a state requirement that it set up new electronic voting machines by the March presidential primary, despite a federal lawsuit charging that the county's current paper system discriminates against blind voters. None of the 18 other Maryland counties with the same March deadline has made a similar request. And no other system is the subject of a lawsuit. The county's request, which was discussed at a state Board of Public Works meeting Wednesday, surprised state and county elections officials and advocates for the blind because a delay could cause the county to lose $1.1 million and would prolong the lawsuit.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2011
I feel some concern about the "new" voting machines being introduced in the Nov. 1 elections in Laurel. These ELECTronic 1242 machines provide no paper trail, or any voter-verifiable record that one's vote has been properly recorded. Lack of a paper trail also presents difficulties in the event of needing a recount. (The only printout available seems to be the totals from each machine at poll closing.) In doing some Internet research on these machines, I have found documentation that during their usage in many areas of the country over the last 20 years they have often been involved in erroneous vote counts.
EXPLORE
October 14, 2011
Voters in Laurel's Nov. 1 city elections have more ways to cast their ballots, and the city has adopted new voting machines that will make counting the different ballots quicker and easier. Kimberley Rau, clerk to the Laurel Board of Election Supervisors, said the new ELECTronic 1242 voting machines were adopted by Hyattsville with such success that Bowie, Greenbelt and now Laurel have followed suit. The big advantage with the new machines, Rau said, is that they have an optical scanner so paper ballots, which include absentee, provisional and early voting ballots, can be fed into the machine to be scanned and counted.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
In response to your editorial, "How the Votes are Counted" (Sept. 16), if Maryland is truly concerned about election results that are not only verifiable but also available much more quickly on election night, we would move as quickly as possible to the optical scan voting system mandated in the law passed by the General Assembly in 2007. The reasons for this are spelled out clearly in your editorial. The time-consuming poll closing procedures necessitated by the cumbersome touch-screen voting equipment are directly related to the system's insecurity, unverifiability and the sheer quantity of machines required to conduct the election.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Patricia Jessamy's legal team is scrutinizing the results of the Baltimore state's attorney's race as challenger Gregg Bernstein's lead widened Thursday after the first round of absentee ballots were counted. Jessamy's lawyers sent letters to both state and city election officials Thursday asking for: •a complete list of the voting machines used in the primary election, a guarantee that the vote verification process will be conducted in public, the election judges' manual and copies of the written procedures for handling voting information at the polling sites as well as for transporting it to the elections board.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
The aftermath of Tuesday's primary election has again focused anxiety on Maryland's electronic voting system, with candidates angry about delayed results and, in the case of the Baltimore state's attorney race, one claiming up to 10,000 votes are missing. The questions about the integrity of the process are fueled by what seems like a low-tech component of the system — the transfer of data from the voting machines to county boards of election — that led to several cases of election night human error.
NEWS
By Rebecca Guterman | August 11, 2010
In Maryland, the 2007 case of then-17-year-old Sarah Boltuck was a wake-up call for youth voting rights. Ms. Boltuck wanted to vote in the February 2008 presidential primary because she would be 18 by the general election, as had been the practice in Maryland for decades, but election officials told her that now it would be prohibited, based on a state court ruling the year before. She and her father refused to take no for an answer. Working with allies like FairVote, she ultimately helped spark both major parties to say they would count the votes of 17-year-olds in their primaries.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2002
COLLEGE PARK -- University of Maryland Professors Paul Herrnson and Benjamin Bederson know as much as almost anyone in the country about voting machines. And to do their job well, they need to try to forget all of it. That's because the pair is part of a growing group of researchers who are undertaking the long-neglected work of studying voting technology -- determining which machines are the most reliable and easy to use, and how they can be improved. To do this, the researchers are delving into the intricacies of new technologies and ballot designs.
NEWS
March 14, 2009
After reading the editorial "Paper ballot cuts" (March 9), I wonder why it is that half the country can vote on optical-scan machines but Maryland seems unable to make the transition on time. The rest of the country also has disabled voters. Maryland is not unique in that way. But 31 states have now passed laws requiring a voter-verified paper ballot, and the most common voting equipment used to meet this requirement is an optical-scan machine. All of these states have certified that they have found voting machines that satisfy federal requirements for voting access for the disabled.
NEWS
March 9, 2009
Is it really possible that a nation that can land a man on the moon and map the human genome can't produce a voting machine that is reliable, secure and fully accessible to the disabled? If such a device exists, it couldn't be found in Maryland last week. And since last Thursday was the official close of bidding for the state's next generation of voting machines (this time with an adequate paper trail), that's troubling news. The problem may come down to bad timing. Just as Maryland may have invested in touch-screen machines too soon after the 2000 election debacle (and before all the bugs were worked out and potential shortcomings acknowledged)
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