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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2012
I've come to think of it as the political equivalent of global warming: Election season seems to get longer and more heated every cycle. I'm not quite as distressed about this as that little girl from Colorado, melting down because she's tired of "Bronco Bama" and Mitt Romney. (Although, note to Mom: your kid is upset, however cutely, and your first thought is to grab your phone and YouTube her?) But really, the noise level this year has been close to deafening, even here in the decidedly unswingy-state of Maryland.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 14, 2014
Every news outlet you can think of has had something to say about Ray Rice. Plus one you might not think of. Cosmopolitan. On its website, the magazine famous for its naughty bedroom advice published a sad and searing commentary by author Roxane Gay on Janay Rice and domestic abuse. The appalling number of battered spouses - one in four women and one in seven men - has not moved the needle on this issue, she said, and she didn't think a video record of it would, either. Not exactly what you'd expect to hear from Cosmo.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 26, 1996
In an effort to increase voter turnout, the Baltimore City Council wants to allow minors to accompany their parents into voting booths.Councilwoman Helen Holton of 5th District introduced the resolution at last night's council meeting.The resolution asks the chairmen of the city Senate and House delegations to the Maryland General Assembly to introduce and support legislation that would permit children younger than 18 to be allowed into the booths. Children 5 and younger now are allowed to accompany their parents.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Early one morning last week, Jack Kane was pacing around a Glen Burnie warehouse, reviewing paperwork and checking equipment to make sure everything was in order to deliver scores of voting machines to regional polling stations. Kane, 26, is the Anne Arundel County project manager for the Kane Co., an Elkridge-based firm that's transporting some 16,000 voting machines to nearly 1,800 voting centers throughout Maryland. Security is a top priority, and part of Kane's job involves making sure machines don't get tampered with.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1996
KENOSHA, Wis. -- In the cluttered offices of striking United Auto Workers Local 960 yesterday, there was abundant evidence both of Big Labor's return to the Democratic fold and of its much reduced clout.Eugene Johnson, a machine operator with 22 years in at Macwhyte Co., said he voted for Ronald Reagan in 1980 and isn't afraid to split his ballot when the right candidate comes along. But after two years of the Republican Congress, he has had enough.Democrats won all of his votes yesterday, from President Clinton, a man about whom Johnson has some frank reservations, to Lydia Spotswood, a labor-friendly Kenosha alderman trying to unseat one of the Republican freshmen swept into office two years ago."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | January 7, 2001
MIAMI - As many as 1,700 Miami-Dade County voters invalidated their presidential ballots because they mistakenly punched the chad immediately below the one corresponding to their preferred candidate, a California researcher has found. Those voters penetrated a meaningless chad - one that didn't correspond to any candidate - probably because their punch cards were not properly aligned with ballot books in the voting booth, said Anthony Salvanto, a faculty fellow in the political science department at the University of California at Irvine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | October 28, 2004
Where: Your neighborhood polling place. Look at your voter registration card, or if you've lost that, visit www. elections.state.md.us. When: Anytime between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. Tuesday. We recommend going early. Why: Make your civic duty sexy and bring a date. Or, heck, bring more than one. Of course, only one person is allowed in the voting booth at a time. Voting is free of charge, and in most precincts you'll even get an "I Voted" sticker. It is limited to those who have registered and are 18 and older.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Cardinal Edwin F. O'Brienapplies the Bible in a convenient - to him - but logically inconsistent way ("Redefining marriage in Md.?" March 2). He cites the book of Genesis, which says that God created males and females, blessed them and told them to multiply. Fair enough, and many of us have enjoyed accepting that mission. But the Bible does not say that everyone must accept that mission - as surely the cardinal knows, since he and his fellow Roman Catholic priests have rejected it, choosing celibacy instead.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
At the North Carroll Senior Center yesterday, players halted an intense game of bingo to take lessons on the high-tech voting machines they will encounter for the first time during the March 2 primary. Jo Liggett, 74, the first in a group of about 75 to test the Diebold AccuVote-TS touch-screen machine, approached the sample voting booth with trepidation. She can simultaneously oversee a dozen bingo cards but said anything that smacks of a computer intimidates her. Minutes after filing her mock ballot, she pronounced the process "clear and decisive."
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 12, 2004
Pretty soon you, the American voter, will enter the sacred sanctity of the voting booth and cast your ballot for the next U.S. president. Or not. It's also possible that your ballot will go back in time and participate in the election of 1848 or wind up in a distant galaxy, helping to elect an alien being with 73 eyeballs (slogan: "A Being of Vision"). The truth is, you don't know what will happen to your ballot, because you might be using one of the new electronic voting machines. These are supposed to eliminate the screw-ups we had in the 2000 election, in which the ballots of thousands of Florida voters were not counted because, due to poor design, many Floridians have the intelligence of a sugar beet.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
I must take exception to a letter from attorney Susan L. Burke Tuesday's Sun ( "Gansler's comments reflect 'boys will be boys' culture," Nov. 12). She questions the inherent character of Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler in reference to the (now famous) beach party at South Bethany this past summer. In my humble opinion, this one occurrence is getting blown way out of proportion. To my knowledge, Mr. Gansler has never abused children, has never operated clandestine meth labs, and has never spent jail time as a serial rapist.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2012
I've come to think of it as the political equivalent of global warming: Election season seems to get longer and more heated every cycle. I'm not quite as distressed about this as that little girl from Colorado, melting down because she's tired of "Bronco Bama" and Mitt Romney. (Although, note to Mom: your kid is upset, however cutely, and your first thought is to grab your phone and YouTube her?) But really, the noise level this year has been close to deafening, even here in the decidedly unswingy-state of Maryland.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Forty-five minutes into his speed dating-style presentation, County Councilman Chris Trumbauer had finally reached "Question O" on the Anne Arundel County ballot, the most crowded of any in Maryland. "Last one!" Trumbauer said to an Annapolis crowd during the recent meeting. "You guys excited? Ready for a new act? The Trumbauer Show's getting old, I know. " The long ballot piles 15 local questions atop of seven statewide initiatives and a presidential election, prompting fears that Anne Arundel voters will face long lines as people try to figure out the questions in the voting booth or that voters will just skip them altogether.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 1, 2012
This is a story about recycling, and how everything is politically charged this election season. My husband carried our newspapers - which, by the way, he believes are hopelessly in the bag for President Barack Obama - to the curb the night before the recycling truck was scheduled. He left them there, not in a recycling bin, but in the cute, little box I keep in the kitchen to hold them. Next morning, the men on the recycling truck took the newspapers - and my cute, little box - and I cursed them.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | September 18, 2012
Speaking last week at a regular meeting of the Edgewood Community Council, Jansen Robinson touched upon one of the greatest disgraces of American civic life, namely that too many people just can't be bothered to vote. Robinson, who has been an Edgewood community activist for a number of years and has made an unsuccessful run for public office, also hit the nail on the head when he enumerated the penalty for not voting, namely being neglected by the government. As Robinson eloquently put it: "If we lived up to our potential we would never have to ask elected officials for anything.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Cardinal Edwin F. O'Brienapplies the Bible in a convenient - to him - but logically inconsistent way ("Redefining marriage in Md.?" March 2). He cites the book of Genesis, which says that God created males and females, blessed them and told them to multiply. Fair enough, and many of us have enjoyed accepting that mission. But the Bible does not say that everyone must accept that mission - as surely the cardinal knows, since he and his fellow Roman Catholic priests have rejected it, choosing celibacy instead.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Forty-five minutes into his speed dating-style presentation, County Councilman Chris Trumbauer had finally reached "Question O" on the Anne Arundel County ballot, the most crowded of any in Maryland. "Last one!" Trumbauer said to an Annapolis crowd during the recent meeting. "You guys excited? Ready for a new act? The Trumbauer Show's getting old, I know. " The long ballot piles 15 local questions atop of seven statewide initiatives and a presidential election, prompting fears that Anne Arundel voters will face long lines as people try to figure out the questions in the voting booth or that voters will just skip them altogether.
FEATURES
By Sheila Dresser and Sheila Dresser,Staff Writer Staff writer Melody Simmons contributed to this story | November 5, 1992
You weren't counted in the official voter turnout, Jason, Jonathan and Andrea, but you sure made your presence felt at the voting booth Tuesday. Welcome to civic duty.You turned out in force at the polls, kids, strapped into strollers, dragged behind the mystery curtain or begging to pull the magic lever as your distracted parents weighed the fate of the nation.For lots of voting parents, leaving the kids at home wasn't an option this election. The daily trip to the baby sitter's included a stop at the polls, and little Katie came along for the ride.
NEWS
November 18, 2011
I read with great interest that the supercommittee isn't quite sure they will be able to reach agreement on their assignment to find a deficit reduction package that will put this country back on the road to financial responsibility. What they might do is agree on is an outline of smaller concessions and defer the most difficult decisions until after the 2012 elections. This, of course, comes as no surprise to most Americans who have little faith in the ability of our elected officials to make bipartisan decisions for the good of the country instead of "kicking the can down the road" for someone else to deal with.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2010
I like the whole ritual of voting. I get attached to "my" polling place, whether it's a school, a firehouse or, as when I lived in Fort Lauderdale, the International Swimming Hall of Fame. (You may have your own idea about what patriotism smells like — maybe a barbecue on the Fourth of July, or even napalm in the morning — but for me it'll always be the scent of chlorine.) I like the cheery efficiency of the poll workers. I like chatting with neighbors I know and trying to place the ones I don't.
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