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Voter Turnout

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By Andrea K. Walker and Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
While competitive races brought voters out in some areas of Maryland, many people chose to sit out Tuesday's election, producing what could be the lowest turnout figure in years. Elections officials weren't expected to have complete results until Wednesday, but reports from poll judges, candidates and voters indicated turnout was light throughout the state. Primary elections generally have lower turnout than general elections, but political watchers said that voters seemed even less enthused than usual about Tuesday's races.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2014
In Ukraine last month, some people braved the threat of violence to get to the polls to vote for a new president. According to news reports, heavily armed men in ski masks tried to scare off voters by smashing ballot boxes and blocking entry to polling stations in the eastern part of the country; election officials were threatened, some kidnapped. In Maryland, we just had a primary election to nominate candidates for governor - you know, like the president of Maryland - and the voter turnout was embarrassingly low . The vast majority of registered Democrats and Republicans did not participate.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2014
In Ukraine last month, some people braved the threat of violence to get to the polls to vote for a new president. According to news reports, heavily armed men in ski masks tried to scare off voters by smashing ballot boxes and blocking entry to polling stations in the eastern part of the country; election officials were threatened, some kidnapped. In Maryland, we just had a primary election to nominate candidates for governor - you know, like the president of Maryland - and the voter turnout was embarrassingly low . The vast majority of registered Democrats and Republicans did not participate.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
The primary election officially began Thursday with early voting, but Anne Arundel County elections officials are expecting low turnout for both early voting and traditional election day voting. Anne Arundel's turnout "might be the lowest ever" at 18 percent to 22 percent, said Joseph A. Torre III, the county's elections director. Typical turnout is in the 28 percent to 33 percent range. Torre based his prediction on the low volume of requests for absentee ballots and the relatively few people who registered as new voters or changed their affiliation in the runup to the primaries.
NEWS
By M. Hirsh Goldberg | November 5, 2002
ONE REFRAIN heard during the Washington-area sniper rampage was that voters in Montgomery and Prince George's counties would shun the polls if the killer were not caught by Election Day, changing the outcome of the gubernatorial race. So we can add snipers to bad weather, illness and a myriad other reasons why so many people don't vote and, as a result, why some candidates win for the wrong reasons. American voter turnout historically has been low. In Maryland, only one-third of registered voters go to the polls in primary elections.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff Patrick Gilbert, William Thompson, Bruce Reid, Kevin Thomas, Jon Morgan and Larry Carson contributed to this story | September 12, 1990
Lou Carter, the chief Democratic election judge at a Bolton Hill polling place, had a simple assesment of yesterday's primary turnout:"It's pathetic."That was the sentiment across much of the state, as only about 30 percent of those eligible voted, despite good weather and a long list of races. That fell below the 35 percent turnout forecast by usually accurate election board officials.At Carter's polling place, less than a quarter of the eligible voters turned out to cast ballots."There doesn't seem to be any controversy.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 8, 2008
Voter turnout in Maryland was not as overwhelming as expected. About 76 percent of registered voters headed to the polls or voted absentee, far short of the projected 85 percent turnout that would have set a record and that elections officials had predicted. The number of ballots cast, however, did reach a high of 2.6 million, according to the Maryland State Board of Elections. Only 66 percent of registered voters in Baltimore City turned out, according to preliminary data. Turnout was higher in Baltimore County, at 75 percent.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | September 12, 1990
If you needed a quiet place to relax yesterday, one of the county's 68 election polling precincts would have filled the bill quite nicely.By 3 p.m., with half the precincts reporting, only 8 percent of the county's registered voters had turned out to select their party's candidates in the statewide primary election.Bored election workers sat idle in churches and schools for much of the day and candidates stood out in the hot sun eagerly shaking the few hands they could get a hold of."It's kind of a ho-hum election," said Tom Hatheway after voting at Longfellow Elementary School.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 27, 1993
A headline about the Cambodian elections in The Sun yesterday referred to the Khmer Rouge as Communists. Though the Khmer Rouge was Marxist through the mid-1980s, the political party of which it is a part now formally espouses "democratic socialism" rather than Marxism-Leninism.The Sun regrets the error.PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Prince Norodom Sihanouk, Cambodia's head of state, announced yesterday that he has abandoned plans to set up a coalition government that included the Khmer Rouge. He said internationally supervised elections this week proved that the Maoist rebels had no place in Cambodia's future.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | April 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Voter participation is running at a record low rate in this year's presidential primaries, with four out of five of those eligible to vote staying home, according to a new study.A total of 18.9 percent of voting-age Americans have taken part ** in primaries so far, the non-partisan Committee for the Study of the American Electorate reported yesterday. The previous record low for a primary season was 20.6 percent in 1984.Compared with 1988, turnout this year is off nearly 12 percent, the report said.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
The state Democratic Party's annual gala was no place for campaign speeches on Wednesday night.   That might seem odd to casual observers. After all, a big primary election is a month away, and the vast ballroom at Martin's Camelot in Prince George's County was filled with top elected officials, candidates and campaign donors. But the gala - a large fundraising event - was a time to talk about party unity and the need for voter turnout efforts in the primary and general elections.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
In response to former Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold's letter ( "Leopold: June primary a self-serving move by Democrats," May 2), I am sure Mr. Leopold remembers from his days as a legislator that one of the most important responsibilities of a lawmaker is to ensure that state law complies with, and does not conflict with, federal law. As he is also aware, the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act required states to move their...
NEWS
May 2, 2014
One of the most cynical and self-serving actions taken by the General Assembly was moving the primary election from September to June Rather than try to stimulate greater voter turnout and public participation in the political process, the June date seeks to depress it. More families are on vacation in June, and interest in voting is expected to be tepid. Maryland had to move its primary date earlier to comply with federal requirements designed to provide enough time to get general election absentee ballots to military personnel serving overseas, but the General Assembly could have moved the date back a matter of weeks rather than months.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The one thing billionaires and their special interest groups are counting on is voter apathy ( "A win for the billionaires," April 4). If they can keep the electorate focused on their personal agendas and cynical about politics, they can buy elections and get legislation passed that serves their interests to the detriment of the rest of the country. But the one thing that scares them is an educated electorate that turns out to vote. Voter turnout will always trump big money. I completely agree on the need for a constitutional convention that would affirm the right of every citizen to vote, limit the influence of big money and refuse to recognize corporations as people.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 10, 2013
There's reason to take notice whenever there's an uncontested election, such as is the case in Bel Air this fall. Uncontested elections are a mark of societies that are subject to tyranny. Just because an election isn't contested, however, doesn't mean the community where the election is taking place isn't free. There are at least two other reasons: apathy and satisfaction. One is as bad as tyranny, the other isn't that big a deal. When an election isn't contested and the reason is satisfaction, there's not much cause for concern.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
On Monday night, the Senate overwhelmingly approved the O'Malley administration's proposal to make it easier to cast a ballot in Maryland despite lingering criticism from some in the GOP that somehow early voting and same-day voter registration will lead to an outbreak of voter fraud. That is about as likely as Rep. Paul Ryan endorsing Amtrak, food stamps and an expansion of Obamacare in his next budget proposal. A far better criticism of the measure is that it doesn't go far enough, or perhaps that it imposes an expensive obligation on local government without providing for a funding source.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | November 2, 1993
Today's mayoral election in Annapolis may hinge on how many voters go to the polls.That's the analysis of supporters of the three candidates, Democratic incumbent Alfred A. Hopkins, Republican Laurance Vincent and independent Dennis M. Callahan.All three candidates promise to have volunteers on the streets encouraging registered voters to cast ballots and providing transportation to those who need it."In the end, it will come down to who is the most organized and gets their people to polls," said a Hopkins campaign worker.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
Expanding the opportunity for qualified residents to vote in an election is seldom, if ever, a bad thing, so Gov. Martin O'Malley's decision to expand early voting and seek same-day registration in Maryland is a welcome development. Too bad that Republicans in Annapolis are already lining up against the measures on purely partisan grounds. One of the more notable features of the 2012 General Election was the high early-voter turnout in Maryland. Some people waited for hours, particularly in Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties, to cast a ballot before Election Day. Altogether, more than 430,000 Marylanders took advantage of early voting (about 16 percent of the total votes cast)
NEWS
November 18, 2012
A week after the election, Mitt Romney, on a conference call with his National Finance Committee, recently blamed his loss on "gifts" President Obama promised to Blacks, Hispanics and young voters ("Obama's 'gifts' to voters fueled his victory, Romney says," Nov. 15). He went on to state that the president followed "the old playbook" of wooing special interests with targeted gifts and initiatives. When I read this in the New York Times, I was bewildered by the nonsensical nature of the comment.
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