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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
About 1,500 people with misdemeanor convictions were mistakenly dropped from Maryland's voter rolls over the past five years, state judiciary officials confirmed Friday. A computer system incorrectly lumped those voters in with felons, who are stripped of their right to vote until their sentence is completed, said Terri Bolling, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Judiciary. People convicted of misdemeanors retain their right to vote in Maryland. Officials said they are fixing the error, discovered in part by former Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold.
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NEWS
September 2, 2014
The recent report by Election Integrity Maryland that there may be as many as 164 individuals who voted in both Maryland and Virginia in the 2012 election hasn't exactly caused the Maryland Board of Elections to press the panic button. There's a reason for that: The numbers don't prove fraud and more likely point to clerical error. That's not to suggest the Fairfax County Electoral Board should not seek criminal investigation, as officials announced last week, into 17 possible cases of duplicate voting in that Northern Virginia county - such due diligence is entirely appropriate - but the chances that such incidents will result in fraud convictions are slim.
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NEWS
August 14, 1991
This is the poster-and-lawn-sign season of Baltimore City politics. Small fortunes are being spent by candidates on signs that are weatherproofed and glow in the dark. If some huckster came up with a sign that sang, there would be a line of eager office-seekers to buy it.Yet signs do not vote, people do.This truth, sadly, seems to have been forgotten by many of the candidates running for election in the city's Sept. 12 primary. While they have been tooting their own horns and knocking door-to-door, few have taken the trouble to register voting-age residents who are not on the rolls.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
About 1,500 people with misdemeanor convictions were mistakenly dropped from Maryland's voter rolls over the past five years, state judiciary officials confirmed Friday. A computer system incorrectly lumped those voters in with felons, who are stripped of their right to vote until their sentence is completed, said Terri Bolling, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Judiciary. People convicted of misdemeanors retain their right to vote in Maryland. Officials said they are fixing the error, discovered in part by former Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
A Baltimore circuit judge ruled yesterday that it would be illegal for the city election board to carry out an order by state election officials to remove more than 32,000 names from the voter rolls.Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan settled a lawsuit brought by the city board against the state election officials, saying that purging the names would violate a state law that became effective Jan. 1.Under a state law no longer in effect, the names should have been removed from city voting rolls last year, before the statewide elections, as part of the so-called "five-year purge."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
Nearly one out of four Marylanders who have tried to register to vote at a Motor Vehicle Administration office in the past four years has not been added to the voter rolls, according to state records obtained by The Sun. Though some of these tens of thousands of would-be voters have undoubtedly found alternative methods to register, officials at the State Board of Elections say they field calls every year from residents who say they turned up at...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2006
CLEVELAND -- For Tony Minor, the pastor of the Community of Faith Assembly in a rundown section of East Cleveland, Ohio's new voter registration rules have meant spending two extra hours a day collecting half as many registration cards from new voters as he did in past years. Republicans say the new rules are needed to prevent fraud, but Democrats say they are making it much harder to register the poor. In the past year, six states have passed such restrictions, and in three states, including Ohio, civic groups have filed lawsuits, arguing that the rules disproportionately affect poor neighborhoods.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
While it is a serious problem that 144,442 would-be voters who registered via the MVA were not added to the voter rolls ( "Nearly 25 percent of MVA voter registrations fail," Feb. 21) it also plays a huge role in explaining why the same voters are called every nine months for jury duty in Baltimore City. If these "dropped" voters could be added, it would greatly increase the jury pool and jurors would be more willing to serve when they know that everyone is participating and not just the same few. Kitty Deimel, Hampden
NEWS
August 26, 1992
In a spot survey of state offices, the American Civil Liberties Union found only sparse compliance with a law requiring state agencies to make voter registration forms available to the public."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1995
The state election board filed notice yesterday that it intends to appeal a Baltimore circuit judge's ruling that city election officials could not legally purge more than 32,000 names from the voter rolls, as ordered by the panel.The five-member State Administrative Board of Election Laws, polled by telephone, approved the proposal to appeal the case on a 3-1 vote, with one member unavailable. John R. Greiber, attorney for the state board, then filed the notice with the Maryland Court of Special Appeals.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
Twenty years after the last time Maryland voters weighed in on a law passed by the General Assembly, they got the chance to do it three times in 2012, with referendums on in-state tuition for some illegal immigrants, same-sex marriage and a gerrymandered congressional district map designed to deliver one more seat to the Democrats. The powers that be in Annapolis are not thrilled - Gov. Martin O'Malley proclaimed it "a little too easy" to put a law on the ballot - and now several of them have introduced legislation to make the task harder.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
Four years after taking the helm of the NAACP and ushering in a generational change for the nation's oldest and most prominent civil rights organization, Ben Jealous arrived as a major force in American politics this year. At a time when restrictive voter identification laws and the purging of voter rolls in some states threatened to disenfranchise millions of minority voters, Mr. Jealous stepped up the NAACP's voter registration and mobilization -- an effor that played no small part in President Barack Obama's victory in November.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
State officials are investigating complaints about long lines at polls that left some voters waiting for two hours on Election Day despite lower than expected turnout. Baltimore elections officials and the Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union also received complaints from voters who said they cast a ballot in the 2008 election but found that their names were not listed on voter rolls Tuesday. State elections officials plan to investigate each of the roughly dozen cases identified.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
A Maryland organization says it has found hundreds of dead people listed on voter registration rolls in Baltimore and Prince George's counties, as well as residents who have registered in multiple places and some who have addresses that turn out to be vacant lots. This November, the group says it plans to fan out to polls to watch for problems - but critics say the effort is a smoke screen for a political agenda. Election Integrity Maryland, which is part of a network of volunteers digging through registration lists across the country, says its mission is to ensure the accuracy of voter registration rolls and encourage citizens to participate in the process.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 3, 2012
Bill Internicola had to show his papers. He received a letter last month from the Broward County, Fla., supervisor of elections informing him the office had "information from the state of Florida that you are not a United States citizen; however, you are registered to vote. " So Internicola had to prove he is an American. He sent the county a copy of his Army discharge papers. Mr. Internicola is 91 years old. He was born in Brooklyn. He is a veteran of the Second World War. He earned a Bronze Star for his part in the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
September 14, 2011
Add another reason to your analysis of Tuesday's dismal Baltimore primary election turnout - a state that actually doesn't want people to be engaged in the political process, especially if there's a possibility they might want to change it. Despite the crocodile tears of politicians asking "what is wrong" with us uninspired, frustrated voters, behind the scenes Maryland's third and fourth-largest political parties are embroiled in a lawsuit for...
NEWS
By Bob Mahlburg and John Kennedy and Bob Mahlburg and John Kennedy,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 11, 2004
TALLAHASSEE - Florida elections officials decided yesterday to scrap a list of "potential felons" after discovering another flaw that could have proved politically explosive for a state trying to run an undisputed election. The database, maligned for weeks by civil rights advocates, was dumped because it shielded virtually all Hispanic felons from being purged from the voter rolls. The admission came on top of earlier errors, such as including thousands of people on the list whose rights had already been restored.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | December 29, 1994
The team researching allegations of voter fraud for gubernatorial candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey called Baltimore County police yesterday and demanded the ejection of a 69-year-old Clarksville volunteer as a possible spy.Police would not release the man's identity, because he was not arrested or charged. If Sauerbrey headquarters decides to press charges, the man might have to appear in court, police spokesman E. Jay Miller said, although his only crime would appear to be pocketing two sheets of paper.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
State elections officials are seeking a criminal investigation into irregularities in the Harford County voter rolls, which they say have been artificially inflated. The probe comes weeks after Harford officials reported the county had just enough active voters to qualify for additional early-voting centers in 2012. State elections administrator Linda H. Lamone said a staff member in her office discovered names on the county's list of active voters that should have been classified as inactive, a designation that generally indicates people who have moved out of the state.
NEWS
March 23, 2011
British writer Aldous Huxley once observed that the only "completely consistent" people were dead. If so, then the majority of Maryland's highest court can be congratulated for producing incontrovertible evidence that they are still very much alive and breathing. In a 5-2 decision released Tuesday, the Court of Appeals ruled that just because a person's signature on a petition for referendum is so sloppy that it is impossible for someone else to read doesn't mean that signature should not be counted.
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