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Voter Apathy

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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff wtB | June 11, 1991
As Baltimore gears up for another citywide election, Barbara E. Jackson ponders voter apathy.Jackson, administrator of the city Board of Elections Supervisors, has watched the number of registered voters dwindle over the last few years. She's even had fewer requests from organizations who need her staff's expertise in running voter-registration drives."It's demoralizing," Jackson said.In June 1987 -- three months before the last citywide election -- there were 386,627 registered voters.As of this month, the figure had dropped to 321,309 -- a decline of 65,318 voters.
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NEWS
June 30, 2014
I was somewhat confused by Dan Rodricks ' column on the low turnout in last week's primary elections ( "Excuses aside, Maryland voter turnout an embarrassment," June 25). I mean, why is he shocked at the low voter turnout? Voter apathy is a direct result of one political party's stranglehold on power in Maryland. Republican voters are apathetic because they know they are outnumbered 2-to-1, and Democrats are the same because they know the coronation of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown was already a done deal by the party's power brokers.
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NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | September 13, 1991
Between the crab cakes and snow cone booths at the Anne Arundel County Fair, Helen Fister is selling fair goers on the Republican Party.She hands voter registration forms to two security guards on a golf cart. They promise to fill them out and bring them back.Anne Riley of Glen Burnie drops by the booth. She wants to switchher allegiance from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party, even though many statewide elections are decided in the Democratic primary."It's a Democratic state, so you really don't get a say in (that)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 26, 2014
In terms of public interest in elections, the voting for members of Congress in off-years, when no presidential candidates are on the ballot, is historically low. The stakes generally seem not very great, and familiarity breeds success for incumbents, who are re-elected at a rate of about 90 percent. The same is likely to be true this November, even as the major political parties and independent special interest groups are focusing frantically on the outcome. They're pouring uncommon amounts of time, money and advertising into the primary elections that are choosing their nominees for the fall voting.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | October 22, 1992
AFTER a week soaking in campaign news, campaign polls, campaign editorials, campaign debates, TV and print analysis of campaign debates, not to mention the campaign insights, reflections, clarifications, expostulations, whinings, wheezings, sneerings, cheerings, frothings, sermonizings and rationalizings of pundits, both printed and tube-borne, I'll tell you how it feels to me.It feels like Bill Clinton has already been president so long that I'm tired of...
NEWS
September 30, 2010
As a volunteer in the Gregg Bernstein campaign, it saddens me racial demographics are being so minutely analyzed ("Bernstein crossed racial lines to win," Sept. 30). I happen to be white, but that's not why I volunteered for Mr. Bernstein. His skin color was no concern to me, it was his position on crime in Baltimore. I spent most of the day handing out his literature near my polling place in a predominantly white neighborhood (Little Italy), and I was appalled by the low turnout.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The one thing billionaires and their special interest groups are counting on is voter apathy ( "A win for the billionaires," April 4). If they can keep the electorate focused on their personal agendas and cynical about politics, they can buy elections and get legislation passed that serves their interests to the detriment of the rest of the country. But the one thing that scares them is an educated electorate that turns out to vote. Voter turnout will always trump big money. I completely agree on the need for a constitutional convention that would affirm the right of every citizen to vote, limit the influence of big money and refuse to recognize corporations as people.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
I was somewhat confused by Dan Rodricks ' column on the low turnout in last week's primary elections ( "Excuses aside, Maryland voter turnout an embarrassment," June 25). I mean, why is he shocked at the low voter turnout? Voter apathy is a direct result of one political party's stranglehold on power in Maryland. Republican voters are apathetic because they know they are outnumbered 2-to-1, and Democrats are the same because they know the coronation of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown was already a done deal by the party's power brokers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1993
HOUSTON -- Even though a court has threatened to shut down the Texas public schools June 1 unless the state divides money for education more equitably, voters rejected yesterday a plan that would have forced some wealthy districts to share money with poor ones.The defeat of the proposed amendment to the state constitution, Proposition 1, throws back to the Legislature the vexing question of how to ensure a decent education for the 3.2 million children in the Texas school system, the nation's second-largest after California's.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | July 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- "Get up, stand up," Bob Marley sings on a video that is part of an innovative campaign to get young people to register to vote.People for the American Way began this year distributing the short video to high schools. It features background music by popular singers and shows young people talking about the importance of voting and individual initiative.Along with the video, the liberal non-profit group is giving teachers a packet of lesson plans intended to reinforce the voting message.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The one thing billionaires and their special interest groups are counting on is voter apathy ( "A win for the billionaires," April 4). If they can keep the electorate focused on their personal agendas and cynical about politics, they can buy elections and get legislation passed that serves their interests to the detriment of the rest of the country. But the one thing that scares them is an educated electorate that turns out to vote. Voter turnout will always trump big money. I completely agree on the need for a constitutional convention that would affirm the right of every citizen to vote, limit the influence of big money and refuse to recognize corporations as people.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
BREAKING NEWS ALERT:  Stephanie Rawlings-Blake glided to victory in the Democratic primary Tuesday, securing the nomination for a full four-year term in the office to which she was appointed last year. ----- Baltimore voters headed to the polls this morning, casting their ballots for mayor in a crowded primary race that could change the direction of the city. But as of 7 p.m., less than 17 percent of eligible voters - about 54,000 people - had cast ballots, a number Baltimore City Elections Director Armstead Jones called "light.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
As a volunteer in the Gregg Bernstein campaign, it saddens me racial demographics are being so minutely analyzed ("Bernstein crossed racial lines to win," Sept. 30). I happen to be white, but that's not why I volunteered for Mr. Bernstein. His skin color was no concern to me, it was his position on crime in Baltimore. I spent most of the day handing out his literature near my polling place in a predominantly white neighborhood (Little Italy), and I was appalled by the low turnout.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | January 12, 2000
VOTER turnout even in presidential elections has been dwindling for 20-plus years, and now polls find that although the presidential primaries are all but upon us, a uniquely large number of potential electors aren't paying the slightest attention. The prospect thus reappears of another president elected by less than half the electorate or even, if the Reform Party gets up a plausible campaign, of a president chosen by only a plurality of a minority, a la President Clinton. And, in turn then, we face the possibility of still another presidency installed with at best an iffy mandate and enjoying none of the benefit of the doubt that a hardy majority provides for early trial and error.
NEWS
December 10, 1995
WHEN PRIME MINISTER Viktor Chernomyrdin hit the campaign trail and went to open a new children's hospital in St. Petersburg, he found the half-built clinic empty. Which is exactly the fear reformers have about the Dec. 17 parliamentary election: With Russia's democracy half-built, will anyone show up at the polls?Nearly four years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia is facing the likelihood that communists are going to stage a comeback in the parliamentary elections because they are angry, motivated and well-organized.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Rafael Alvarez contributed to this article | September 14, 1994
The miniature American flags in poll workers' boaters waved serenely in the breeze. It was a warm breeze, the kind of perfect late-summer breeze that entices people from their homes.Except that the people, most of them, didn't go to the polls yesterday.From church to library to American Legion hall across the Baltimore region, the question rippled: Where are the voters?Eric Jackson was shopping at the Mall in Columbia. A 33-year-old resident of Columbia, Mr. Jackson is vice principal of a Prince George's County school.
NEWS
By Wiley A Hall 3rd | September 12, 1991
What if nobody voted?"Nobody?"Yeah.Gene M. Raynor, administrator of the State Administrative Board of Election Laws, thought about this for a moment."Well, that wouldn't happen, would it?" he said. "Somebody will always vote."But what if they didn't?"I suppose if there were a catastrophic event, like an earthquake or something, the survivors would get together and set a new date."But what if there weren't a catastrophic event? What if the voters just got so mad or so bored that they all stayed home to teach the candidates a lesson?
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Rafael Alvarez contributed to this article | September 14, 1994
The miniature American flags in poll workers' boaters waved serenely in the breeze. It was a warm breeze, the kind of perfect late-summer breeze that entices people from their homes.Except that the people, most of them, didn't go to the polls yesterday.From church to library to American Legion hall across the Baltimore region, the question rippled: Where are the voters?Eric Jackson was shopping at the Mall in Columbia. A 33-year-old resident of Columbia, Mr. Jackson is vice principal of a Prince George's County school.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1993
HOUSTON -- Even though a court has threatened to shut down the Texas public schools June 1 unless the state divides money for education more equitably, voters rejected yesterday a plan that would have forced some wealthy districts to share money with poor ones.The defeat of the proposed amendment to the state constitution, Proposition 1, throws back to the Legislature the vexing question of how to ensure a decent education for the 3.2 million children in the Texas school system, the nation's second-largest after California's.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | October 22, 1992
AFTER a week soaking in campaign news, campaign polls, campaign editorials, campaign debates, TV and print analysis of campaign debates, not to mention the campaign insights, reflections, clarifications, expostulations, whinings, wheezings, sneerings, cheerings, frothings, sermonizings and rationalizings of pundits, both printed and tube-borne, I'll tell you how it feels to me.It feels like Bill Clinton has already been president so long that I'm tired of...
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