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NEWS
May 21, 2005
On May 19, 2005, MARIAN AMELIA VORIS; beloved wife of the late Harold Calvin Voris; devoted mother of Gary L. Voris and Penny Cochran (nee Voris). Loving grandmother of Mary Joy Campbell, Thomas Cochran, Karen Ches and Linda Liberto. Also survived by four great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the family owned Bruzdzinski Funeral Home, P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Avenue, Essex at Route 702 (beltway exit 36), on Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral services on Monday at 11 A.M. Interment Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
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NEWS
November 5, 2005
On November 3, 20O5, GARY LUTHER VORIS; beloved husband of Shirley Voris; devoted father of Joy Campbell; loving brother of Penny Cochran. Friends may call at the family owned Bruzdzinski Funeral Home, P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Ave, Essex, (Beltway Exit 36) on Sunday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services on Monday, at 11 A.M. Interment Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2002
Helen P. Voris, a retired Anne Arundel County public school educator and a Howard County historian, died in her sleep Wednesday at her home in the Lawyers Hill section of Elkridge. She was 84. Mrs. Voris had just built a new patio herself, completing it the day before she died. Born Helen Pressley in Lansdowne, she moved to Elkridge in 1919 and lived there for the rest of her life. A graduate of Howard County public schools, Mrs. Voris earned her bachelor's degree from Mary Washington College in Fredericksburg, Va., in 1938.
NEWS
August 13, 2005
Roy M. Voris, 86, a World War II ace and the first flight leader of the Blue Angels, died at his home in Monterey, Calif., on Wednesday, the precision flying team said. Captain Voris was selected by Adm. Chester Nimitz in 1946 to organize the Blue Angels, now based at Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida. The team made its first public appearance June 15 that year at Craig Field in Jacksonville. Officially, the Blue Angels were created to boost Navy morale, recruiting and public relations, Captain Voris said in an interview with the Associated Press in 1996, when the team celebrated its 50th anniversary.
NEWS
August 13, 2005
Roy M. Voris, 86, a World War II ace and the first flight leader of the Blue Angels, died at his home in Monterey, Calif., on Wednesday, the precision flying team said. Captain Voris was selected by Adm. Chester Nimitz in 1946 to organize the Blue Angels, now based at Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida. The team made its first public appearance June 15 that year at Craig Field in Jacksonville. Officially, the Blue Angels were created to boost Navy morale, recruiting and public relations, Captain Voris said in an interview with the Associated Press in 1996, when the team celebrated its 50th anniversary.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | March 1, 1993
As a wife and mother of four, Helen Voris has cooked thousands of meals, attended school functions and presided over Girl Scout meetings. But after all those years, the 75-year-old Elkridge resident had nothing to show for it. She worried there was little to remind her now-grown children of her efforts."
NEWS
January 13, 2003
Friends of the Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway Inc. will hold its third Winter Feast on Feb. 1 at Patapsco Valley State Park, featuring food cooked over an open fire and stories. "We've been working to tell the stories of the Patapsco Valley and to connect people to its history," said Sally Voris, who describes herself as "chief cook and bottle-washer and director of outreach" for the Friends. The first feast was held at Howard County Center for the Arts in Ellicott City, Voris said.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | October 27, 2003
The Patapsco Players took their show on the road Oct. 11 to the 37th annual meeting of the Oral History Association at the Hyatt Regency in Bethesda. This year's theme was "Creating Communities: Cultures, Neighborhoods and Institutions." There were seminars, talks and discussions, but the troupe - Sally Voris, Gwen Marable and Gail Rosen, accompanied by musician Walter Jones Jr. - presented A Completely Different World, a play written by Voris and drawn from oral histories collected by folklorist Alison Kahn from 1997 to 2000.
NEWS
June 7, 2004
The Patapsco Players will present its last performance of A Completely Different World at 3 p.m. Sunday at the historic Patapsco Manor in Elkridge. The performance is sponsored by the Friends of the Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway Inc. The hourlong production portrays life in the Patapsco Valley in the early and mid-20th century. "It takes the words of ... oral history and weaves them together and creates a portrait of community," said Sally Voris, the group's director. "We tell stories of how people came to the valley, and how they worked together and lived together -- or didn't.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2000
WHEN SALLY VORIS was growing up in the Lawyers' Hill section of Elkridge, residents shared a strong sense of community. They gathered regularly at the Elkridge Assembly Hall on Lawyers' Hill Road to produce plays and hold square dances, continuing a tradition that began in the 19th century. "There were so many occasions for people from age 7 to 70 to come together then," Voris recalled. "With so many people moving around now, communities aren't as deeply layered." Through a desire to rekindle this sense of community, Voris and fellow members of the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee started the Story Circles of the Patapsco Valley project.
NEWS
June 7, 2004
The Patapsco Players will present its last performance of A Completely Different World at 3 p.m. Sunday at the historic Patapsco Manor in Elkridge. The performance is sponsored by the Friends of the Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway Inc. The hourlong production portrays life in the Patapsco Valley in the early and mid-20th century. "It takes the words of ... oral history and weaves them together and creates a portrait of community," said Sally Voris, the group's director. "We tell stories of how people came to the valley, and how they worked together and lived together -- or didn't.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | October 27, 2003
The Patapsco Players took their show on the road Oct. 11 to the 37th annual meeting of the Oral History Association at the Hyatt Regency in Bethesda. This year's theme was "Creating Communities: Cultures, Neighborhoods and Institutions." There were seminars, talks and discussions, but the troupe - Sally Voris, Gwen Marable and Gail Rosen, accompanied by musician Walter Jones Jr. - presented A Completely Different World, a play written by Voris and drawn from oral histories collected by folklorist Alison Kahn from 1997 to 2000.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2003
Radwan Jaber, a Druse from Lebanon who lives in Rockville, casually offered his insights on war, peace, domination and cooperation at a meeting in Howard County last week. "Groups that advocate violence have their own political agenda," said Jaber, a pharmacist. "But it's self-defeating. Whenever there is killing, you are really destroying something inside you. Somehow, you have to transcend hate. You can't fight hate with hate. The most dangerous thing is when you have a closed mind. You are limiting your reality."
NEWS
January 13, 2003
Friends of the Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway Inc. will hold its third Winter Feast on Feb. 1 at Patapsco Valley State Park, featuring food cooked over an open fire and stories. "We've been working to tell the stories of the Patapsco Valley and to connect people to its history," said Sally Voris, who describes herself as "chief cook and bottle-washer and director of outreach" for the Friends. The first feast was held at Howard County Center for the Arts in Ellicott City, Voris said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2002
Helen P. Voris, a retired Anne Arundel County public school educator and a Howard County historian, died in her sleep Wednesday at her home in the Lawyers Hill section of Elkridge. She was 84. Mrs. Voris had just built a new patio herself, completing it the day before she died. Born Helen Pressley in Lansdowne, she moved to Elkridge in 1919 and lived there for the rest of her life. A graduate of Howard County public schools, Mrs. Voris earned her bachelor's degree from Mary Washington College in Fredericksburg, Va., in 1938.
NEWS
January 23, 2001
Helen Voris is a local historian who lives on Lawyers Hill in Elkridge. These excerpts are from her book "Elkridge: Where It All Began," published last year, describing 19th-century life on the hill. Residents of Lawyers Hill mentioned in the book include Judge George Washington Dobbin and lawyers Thomas Donaldson, J.H.B. Latrobe and Benjamin Waters. The Dobbin sisters - Jeannette, Annette and Rebecca - were granddaughters of G. W. Dobbin's; George Dobbin Brown was his grandson. Helen Voris and her family purchased their home, a property then called "Wayside," from Jeannette Dobbin.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2003
Radwan Jaber, a Druse from Lebanon who lives in Rockville, casually offered his insights on war, peace, domination and cooperation at a meeting in Howard County last week. "Groups that advocate violence have their own political agenda," said Jaber, a pharmacist. "But it's self-defeating. Whenever there is killing, you are really destroying something inside you. Somehow, you have to transcend hate. You can't fight hate with hate. The most dangerous thing is when you have a closed mind. You are limiting your reality."
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2000
WHEN SALLY VORIS was growing up in the Lawyers' Hill section of Elkridge, residents shared a strong sense of community. They gathered regularly at the Elkridge Assembly Hall on Lawyers' Hill Road to produce plays and hold square dances, continuing a tradition that began in the 19th century. "There were so many occasions for people from age 7 to 70 to come together then," Voris recalled. "With so many people moving around now, communities aren't as deeply layered." Through a desire to rekindle this sense of community, Voris and fellow members of the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee started the Story Circles of the Patapsco Valley project.
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