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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 17, 1993
CHICAGO -- Every morning at 6, Anthony Mojica's mother drops him off on West Cortez St. on her way to work. Anthony watches TV and waits for a couple of hours under the watchful eye of Ruth Munoz before heading off to make the 8:30 a.m. bell at Lafayette Language Academy, where he is a fifth-grader.But yesterday, it was Anthony, 10, who had the watchful eye.The Humboldt Park home he walked into had been poisoned by carbon monoxide from a faulty space heater, and it wasn't long after he arrived that the family there became ill -- collapsing on the floor, vomiting and drifting into unconsciousness.
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SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
As Catholic's Ellie Gonzalez staked out a lead in the Girls Elite race of the Spiked Shoe Invitational in September, she felt a familiar urge. She needed to throw up. So with a runner breathing down her neck, Gonzalez puked and kept going. "It's kind of a common thing," she said. Gonzalez didn't break stride, finishing in first place and beating out her competition by five seconds. Later, she asked if second-place finisher Isabel Griffith had noticed her getting sick.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1992
They're calling it the flu, but the illness that struck President George Bush today was more likely a stomach virus transmitted by a food handler who failed to use proper bathroom hygiene, a Maryland public health official said today."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
Stand-up comedians, whether they're titans of the industry with HBO specials or aspiring amateurs curious about the artform, know what it's like to get nervous. The clichés are often true: Palms sweat, pacing occurs backstage and the question “Is this bit funny?” constantly swirls in a comic's head. Sometimes, even some vomit hits the floor. Last night at Jilly's in Pikesville, first-time stand-up comic Ayanna Marsh “puked in her own lap” multiple times as she waited to take the stage, says T. Brad Hudson, creator of the Drink Till We're Funny comedy show.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | July 30, 2008
A 28-year-old Jarrettsville man pleaded guilty yesterday to voluntary manslaughter in the death of his former live-in girlfriend's 2-year-old son, Anthony Joseph D'Urso. Circuit Judge Charles G. Bernstein sentenced Paul Highfield of the 4000 block of Security Lane to the maximum 10 years in prison. On Sept. 12, 2006, prosecutors said, the boy's mother left her son in Highfield's care while she was at work.
FEATURES
By Dr.T.Berry Brazelton | October 30, 1990
DR. T. BERRY Brazelton and the New York Times Syndicat have been advised that the method for handling a poisoning emergency recommended in Dr. Brazelton's column "Childproofing Your Home" (published in Accent Tuesday, Oct. 30) is not the most up-to-date first-response method recommended by the American Association of Poison Control Centers Inc. and could be harmful to a child if misused.The American Association of Poison Control Centers offers the following guidelines for handling a poisoning emergency:* Never give salt water to a poisoning victim -- especially a child -- to induce vomiting.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
Last night's Aberdeen-at-Edgewood boys basketball game was postponed after a ceiling pole supporting a basketball hoop came down, causing the backboard to swing down and hit a man in the head. The man, whom school and police officials identified only as a teacher at Edgewood Middle School, was taken by helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma, but a police official said his injuries weren't life threatening. Harford County school spokesman Donald Morrison said he was told that an auxiliary basket was being raised to allow fans better visibility of the court when the pole dislodged from its brackets.
FEATURES
By Susan White and Susan White,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 1, 1992
Grace Stevens was working in a doughnut shop in Ashland, Ky., when she met Bob Hatfield, a carhop at a drive-in restaurant. Thirty-three days later they were married.They were two country people who had grown up working hard and eating hearty. They looked forward to passing along their lifestyle to their own children someday.But something went wrong.The Hatfields' elder daughter, Robin, followed in the footsteps of Grace, a large woman who says that all the women in her family are large.But Regina, the younger daughter, was different.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 20, 1992
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Edward Fritz, Ocean City: After reading your column of Jan. 10, I feel obliged to write and express my disgust at your selection of a topic on which to write, especially when many who read your column will be having their breakfast.Never in my 66 years have I seen an entire column written on the subject of vomiting.COMMENT: How many times in your 66 years has the president of the United States vomited in public? I am sorry, but I have a sacred duty to remain relevant.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
Broadneck High School canceled Friday's lacrosse game because the older brother of a player has been diagnosed with viral meningitis, a contagious disease that can be fatal.Principal Linda B. Blackman sent a note home with students Friday, advising parents that the 1996 Broadneck graduate had fallen ill and that administrators were in contact with the county Health Department and other public health officials."All parties believe that there is no reason for alarm regarding this disease being contracted by our students or staff as a result of this graduate's illness," Blackman wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam | September 15, 2011
Now that the “Sunny” writers don't have to improvise around Dee Reynolds' baby bump this season, “Sunny” fans may find themselves wondering, “Why is Mac the fat one now?” Maybe it's because Mac (Rob McElhenney) is carrying around a trash bag full of chimichangas. (To picture his new look, see Roger Clarvin - Will Ferrell's character in the Hot Tub Lovers skit on “SNL.”) Or maybe it's because the members of the gang have now reached their “Second Acts.” Dennis (Glenn Howerton)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 12, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National  • Flip flop? Romney says he'd undo Obama's health care program . (USA Today)  • More reason to be glad he's dead: Bin Laden obsessed with more U.S. attack s. (Washington Post)  • Ruppersberger to see  bin Laden death photos . (Baltimore Sun)
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | July 30, 2008
A 28-year-old Jarrettsville man pleaded guilty yesterday to voluntary manslaughter in the death of his former live-in girlfriend's 2-year-old son, Anthony Joseph D'Urso. Circuit Judge Charles G. Bernstein sentenced Paul Highfield of the 4000 block of Security Lane to the maximum 10 years in prison. On Sept. 12, 2006, prosecutors said, the boy's mother left her son in Highfield's care while she was at work.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 27, 2007
Just about anyone who has attended a too-rowdy party knows the scene: Someone begins drinking and doesn't know when to stop. Rambunctious behavior, slurred words, an uneven gait and sometimes even unconsciousness follows. While drinking in moderation can be pleasurable, drinking too much can lead to alcohol poisoning, a severe and potentially fatal reaction to an overdose. Too much alcohol can shut down parts of the brain that control the gag reflex (which prevents choking) and breathing, says McRae Williams, an emergency-room physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By Martha Brannigan and Martha Brannigan,McClatchy-Tribune | December 15, 2006
Cruise ships are getting a tidal wave of bad publicity from norovirus -- including back-to-back outbreaks on voyages of Royal Caribbean's Freedom of the Seas, the world's largest cruise ship. Drowned out amid the recent spate of outbreaks is that the stomach bug is hitting hard on land these days, too. It's probably on a doorknob or handrail near you. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta say the norovirus family of viruses seems to be on the rise lately, though it has data only for cruise ships and food-borne outbreaks.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2003
Last night's Aberdeen-at-Edgewood boys basketball game was postponed after a ceiling pole supporting a basketball hoop came down, causing the backboard to swing down and hit a man in the head. The man, whom school and police officials identified only as a teacher at Edgewood Middle School, was taken by helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma, but a police official said his injuries weren't life threatening. Harford County school spokesman Donald Morrison said he was told that an auxiliary basket was being raised to allow fans better visibility of the court when the pole dislodged from its brackets.
NEWS
By Martha Brannigan and Martha Brannigan,McClatchy-Tribune | December 15, 2006
Cruise ships are getting a tidal wave of bad publicity from norovirus -- including back-to-back outbreaks on voyages of Royal Caribbean's Freedom of the Seas, the world's largest cruise ship. Drowned out amid the recent spate of outbreaks is that the stomach bug is hitting hard on land these days, too. It's probably on a doorknob or handrail near you. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta say the norovirus family of viruses seems to be on the rise lately, though it has data only for cruise ships and food-borne outbreaks.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 27, 2007
Just about anyone who has attended a too-rowdy party knows the scene: Someone begins drinking and doesn't know when to stop. Rambunctious behavior, slurred words, an uneven gait and sometimes even unconsciousness follows. While drinking in moderation can be pleasurable, drinking too much can lead to alcohol poisoning, a severe and potentially fatal reaction to an overdose. Too much alcohol can shut down parts of the brain that control the gag reflex (which prevents choking) and breathing, says McRae Williams, an emergency-room physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
FEATURES
January 6, 2000
SILVER SPRING -- In this post-modern, omni-ironic world we inhabit, fewer and fewer things are exactly what they say they are. "The Movie Show on Radio" is one of those straightforward rarities. It's a show about movies. It's on radio. How hard is that? Think "Sneak Previews," minus the thumbs. And minus clips, too, at least visual ones. Once you get past "The Movie Show's" straightforward mission, however, its back-story is as full of twists and turns as the latest installment in the "Lethal Weapon" franchise.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
Broadneck High School canceled Friday's lacrosse game because the older brother of a player has been diagnosed with viral meningitis, a contagious disease that can be fatal.Principal Linda B. Blackman sent a note home with students Friday, advising parents that the 1996 Broadneck graduate had fallen ill and that administrators were in contact with the county Health Department and other public health officials."All parties believe that there is no reason for alarm regarding this disease being contracted by our students or staff as a result of this graduate's illness," Blackman wrote.
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