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By ANNIE LINSKEY | February 19, 2006
The event that will set this year's Volvo Ocean Race apart from the previous competition is something called the "in-port race" - a sailboat contest in which spectators will get to see the fleet of seven 70-foot- long boats tacking back and forth as they race around a set of buoys. "Nothing quite like this has happened on the bay," said Lee Tawney, who works for Ocean Race Chesapeake, which is organizing events for the Volvo race during its four-week stop in Baltimore and Annapolis. "It would be like having the America's Cup here."
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race organizers wanted to come to Baltimore in May 2015 as part of their 'round-the-world competition but had one request: Could it share the spotlight with the Preakness Stakes or bump the Triple Crown horse race to another date? The city said thanks, but no way. So Tuesday, the only U.S. stopover of the Volvo went instead to Newport, R.I. "We were shocked," said Robert Housman, executive director of Ocean Racing USA, the Baltimore bidder. "It would be discouraging to work hard on something and lose, but clearly they moved the finish line.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey | September 21, 2005
When the Volvo Ocean Race comes to Annapolis in the spring, G. Russell Bowler will have a particular reason to be thrilled to see the boats sail up the bay. His firm, Farr Yacht Design, dreamed up the designs for four of the seven boats competing, including the only American boat - the Disney-sponsored Pirates of the Caribbean. This year's boats will be different than those in previous Volvo Ocean Races. New design parameters announced in September 2003 allow the boats to be longer - 70 feet rather than 60 feet, and allow an unlimited number of appendages (advanced-sail-design speak for keels, rudders and other things that hang off the bottom of the boat)
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race officials will visit Baltimore on Monday to evaluate a bid to host the only U.S. stop of the 2014-2015 edition of the round-the-world contest known as the Super Bowl of sailing. Volvo officials are expected to begin announcing the ports along the route next week. Announcements will continue into February. "I really believe we're going to win this thing," said Rob Housman, an executive director of Ocean Racing USA, the private-sector bidder. "The success of Sailabration last summer shows Baltimore knows how to do fantastic water events.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Five tall ships and a government research vessel are slated to dock in at the Inner Harbor during visits late this month and in early May as part of the Volvo Ocean Race stopover in Baltimore, according to Sail Baltimore, a local nonprofit group that welcomes visiting ships. The vessels, along with the racing craft, are expected to draw as many as 500,000 visitors, said Laura Stevenson, executive director of Sail Baltimore. The organization was founded in 1975 and has hosted more than 400 visiting ships and 35 maritime events.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | January 29, 2006
While listening to a panel of Volvo Ocean Race skippers and big-wigs do damage-control at a news conference last week, it occurred to me that this year's round-the-world race feels a lot like drag racing. Those low-to-the-ground land vehicles go more than 330 mph and break speed records. The cars are on the forefront of design. New technology is tested right out there on the race track. Of course, there are accidents. "Anytime you are on the ragged edge of trying to get the car to get to the top of its performance, there are things that can happen," said Anthony Vestal, the media relations director for the National Hot Rod Association.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | April 30, 2006
Set your timer. Depending on when you read this, the Volvo Ocean Race yachts will slide into Annapolis in a little over 100 hours. Sailors, sailing wannabes and anyone else who likes big, fast, expensive sailboats will trek into downtown Annapolis for a chance to rub shoulders with around-the-world racers and see yachts that have beaten speed records. "When the boats are here, [Annapolis] is the center of the universe when it comes to sailing," said Jeff Holland, who was in charge of the Annapolis part of the stopover in 2002.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Norfolk, Va. -- As six giant Volvo Ocean Race sailboats sped through the mouth of the Chesapeake toward Baltimore a week and a half ago, Gary Jobson stood on a dock, steaming mad. The ESPN commentator's carefully plotted plan to jump aboard a yacht appeared to be in shambles. The camera crew was late getting to the marina. The weather wasn't cooperating. A boat that was to ferry him to the racing yacht was 70 miles behind schedule. Jobson, once a force in the round-the-world race, was now, literally and figuratively, left waiting on the dock.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
Baltimore and Annapolis - the only U.S. stopovers for the 2005-2006 Volvo Ocean Race - now have a hometown syndicate led by a local veteran of global sailing. George Collins, who led Chessie Racing, the yacht in the 1997-98 Whitbread campaign, is chairman of the new Annapolis-based syndicate Team Kan-do. The announcement yesterday by Volvo Ocean Race in Southampton, England, was greeted with delight by the region's sailing and civic community. "It's a gigantic boost for the area. ... It keeps the Chesapeake in the center of attention," said Gary Jobson, sailing analyst for ESPN and NBC, who lives in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 26, 2002
Illbruck Challenge set out yesterday to celebrate an early Volvo Ocean Race victory when it was the first across the start line in LaRochelle, France, for the tricky eighth leg of the round-the-word sailing race. The German entry, which has four leg victories and an eight-point lead in the overall standings after seven of nine legs, can win the 32,700-mile race if it covers the 1,075 nautical miles and arrives first in Goteborg, Sweden, Volvo's hometown. But to do so, it must conquer the challenging English Channel and the North Sea. "Tactically it is a difficult leg - a lot of peninsulas and a lot of current," illbruck skipper John Kostecki said before leaving the small French sailing community.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Gregory H. Barnhill, a career investment banker who embraced and promoted hundreds of civic projects and charities, ended his life Friday evening in Baltimore County. He was 59 and lived in Stevenson. "Greg was a very good citizen who always believed in giving back," said former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, a friend. "He was always one of the businessmen to be counted upon in any activity beneficial to Baltimore or to the state. " Mr. Barnhill spent much of his early career with the old Alex.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | November 8, 2007
A Who's Who of competitive sailing will face off tomorrow and Saturday at the Inner Harbor for the renewal of the Senator's Cup. The regatta, which will be visible from the lawn at Fort McHenry, will feature six skippers - all of them America's Cup veterans - in one-on-one match racing in 35-foot sailboats. "Spectators will be able to see the sailing qualities and intensity of America's Cup action right from the shoreline. The races will be quick and closely fought," said John A. Pica Jr., a former state senator and founder of the event.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2007
After successfully playing host to the Volvo Ocean Race for three voyages, Baltimore and Annapolis will be left high and dry during the 2008-2009 sailing event. Race officials are scheduled to announce tomorrow that Boston will be the North American stopover for the around-the-world race, according to a spokeswoman for the Massachusetts economic development office. More than a sailboat race, the Volvo was a financial force in the region.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | June 18, 2006
The Maryland sailing community was, a mere month ago, enjoying a warm feeling of success that came from a smooth stopover for the Volvo Ocean Race and the opening of the Sailing Hall of Fame in Annapolis. Since that time, nautical disaster has struck twice in the Volvo race and once close to home with the loss of Capital publisher Philip Merrill in the Chesapeake last weekend. The possibility of death at sea is nothing new to mariners -- but the losses have cast a somber mood in sailing circles.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
Hours before the first of the multimillion-dollar yachts in the Volvo Ocean Race crossed the finish line in Goteborg, Sweden, yesterday, seven months and five days after they started, race organizers removed any doubt about the competition's future. Not only will there be another global circumnavigation, but it will also return in three years, a break in the traditional four-year cycle, and include new ports of call. "This is an exciting time in the long and proud history of the Volvo Ocean Race," said Glenn Bourke, chief executive of the race, as he unveiled the outline for a bigger, bolder competition.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Hans Horrevoets, who died early yesterday in the Atlantic Ocean after being swept overboard while trimming the spinnaker sheet on ABN Amro Two, was among the last sailors to sign on for the Volvo Ocean Race and made a strong impression during its recent three- week stopover in Baltimore and Annapolis. Horrevoets, a 32-year-old from the Netherlands, was the oldest crew member on the second Dutch entry in the seven-boat, around-the-world race. He was the only father on his crew, as he leaves behind a wife, Petra, and infant daughter, Bobbi.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 9, 2002
After racing more than 32,000 nautical miles in 8 1/2 months, the eight-boat fleet in the Volvo Ocean Race left Goteborg, Sweden, yesterday, on the final, 250-mile Leg 9 to Kiel, Germany, in a slow, agonizing search for a winner of the round-the-world race. Sailing in light fluky winds of six knots to nearly no wind at all, the fleet was separated by less than five nautical miles from front to back. Ten hours after a spectator fleet of more than 4,000 boats sent the racers on their overnight sprint to Kiel, Sweden's ASSA ABLOY and Team SEB were locked in a battle with Norway's djuice dragons for the lead, with less than a mile separating them.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2006
After nearly three weeks of being bottled up in the Chesapeake Bay, the seven yachts of the Volvo Ocean Race headed back to the open sea yesterday on the strength of building breezes and a send-off party of several thousand spectator boats. Under a milky blue sky, the boats raced from the starting line at Thomas Point Light off Anne Arundel County northward toward the Bay Bridge - where the old eastbound span had been given over to pedestrians and thousands more people took advantage of its distant view of the racers.
NEWS
By JERRY JACKSON and JERRY JACKSON,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
With most sports, the best photos are taken at the edge of the field, near the action. But I discovered that when the field is a mile wide, the best seat is way up in the nosebleed section - in a helicopter. When I was asked to cover the restart of the Volvo Ocean Race from the air a couple of weeks ago, I quickly said yes. But inside, my stomach was churning. My last aerial assignment, photographing waterfowl from a seaplane, left me dizzy for a week. My apprehension was replaced with a big grin when our tiny, two-seat Robinson helicopter popped across the Severn River and hovered alongside thousands of people hiking across the Bay Bridge.
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