Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVolvo
IN THE NEWS

Volvo

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | August 8, 1991
Volvo plans to drop Baltimore as a port of entry for its cars, but despite that loss, car traffic through the port remains healthy.William A. Kroh, head of two sister companies that handle the majority of the cars shipped through the port, confirmed yesterday the decision of Volvo to drop Baltimore. Volvo, which had been using 10 ports in North America, has decided to cut back to four.On the East Coast, Volvo is dropping Portsmouth, Va., and Baltimore.The company will continue to use Halifax, Nova Scotia, Newark, N.J., and Jacksonville, Fla.Volvo had been bringing in about 15,000 cars a year through Dundalk Marine Terminal, a Volvo spokesman said yesterday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
The Volvo Group is expanding its 1,340-worker Hagerstown plant and plans to add more than 100 jobs there, the company announced Friday. Volvo, which makes heavy-duty engines and transmissions at the facility, anticipates a $30 million expansion. The company is upgrading the plant, centralizing some warehousing efforts and bringing back work - machining and assembly operations for Mack heavy-duty drive axles - that was handled in Hagerstown years ago but had been moved to a third-party supplier in Pennsylvania.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 7, 1993
PARIS -- After two years of partnership and several months of complex negotiations that were concluded only on Friday, Renault of France and Volvo of Sweden announced yesterday that they would merge on Jan. 1, forming the world's sixth-largest automotive group.The merger, which had long been rumored and became widely anticipated over the weekend, is aimed at allowing the two companies to weather the severe recession buffeting the European automobile industry. It will also strengthen them as they prepare for the tougher competition that will come when all restrictions on Japanese auto sales in the European Community are lifted in January 1999.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 13, 2013
I don't know how to answer Michael Hanchard's questions, but I understand why he asks them: "If we were a middle-aged white couple, rather than a black couple, and if the group of people who surrounded us were black or Latino, rather than white, would the attackers have been treated with impunity? "Would police officers have told a middle-aged white couple there was no way to determine whether they had been … assaulted?" Before you go thinking that Michael Hanchard is a black man who plays the race card first and asks questions later, consider that the 53-year-old professor of political science at the Johns Hopkins University waited a year to speak about this.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 2, 2007
Typical teen-ager, that Eli Kahn. He wants a car. But he?s gone about trying to get one in the most unusual way. First, surviving the leukemia that struck him at age 3. Then collecting and recycling thousands of used printer cartridges to raise nearly $30,000 for children?s cancer research at Hopkins,where he was treated. And lately, cajoling people far and wide to vote for him on www.VolvoForLifeAwards.com. Kahn?s Cartridges For A Cure project, launched to mark his bar mitzvah in 2004, has made him a candidate for the national "Volvo For Life" award.
SPORTS
By Chris Larson and Chris Larson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2002
ABOARD ASSA ABLOY - Wet, wild and fast! That's exactly how my last report started. The past three days have been incredible sailing. It may not be comfortable, but we are sailing, for sure, the fastest 24-hour monohull runs recorded. We have logged more than 440 miles each day - an average speed of 18-19 knots. In addition, our top speed is 33.2 knots (38.2 mph). Blasting down waves and surfing in the mid-20s is old hat now. No one hardly notices. If we are not blasting over waves, we are plowing through them.
SPORTS
By Ellen Gamerman BTC and Ellen Gamerman BTC,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1998
One day, a young sailor will look out at the sea, imagine a distant adventure and proclaim: "I want to do the Volvo."The Volvo?It may sound a little strange, but the future organizers of the Whitbread Round the World Race expect that one day a new generation of sailors will know the 31,600-nautical-mile adventure its new name, the Volvo Ocean Race Round the World.Volvo, the Swedish car company, revealed details yesterday about its new ownership of the race after a 25-year sponsorship by the English brewery Whitbread.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | September 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- Fear not, Volvo fans, your solid car will not be replaced with a rattly Renault any time soon.That, at least, was the message brought to America by Pehr G. Gyllenhammar, Volvo's longtime chief executive and head of the committee that oversees the new Renault-Volvo car company.Mr. Gyllenhammar, on the last leg of a two-continent trip to convince analysts and consumers that the two companies' merger was a good idea, said Renault-Volvo RVA would keep a divided product line.Up to $5 billion would be saved by the end of the decade on joint purchasing and development of basic technology, he said, but the company would produce two distinctly different lines of cars.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | July 30, 2003
For two veterans of the Volvo Ocean Race, home and work will be one and the same during the 2005-06 campaign. Neal and Lisa McDonald of England, each of whom skippered a yacht during the 2001-2002 global race, will be the first husband-and-wife team in the history of the event. They have yet to find commercial sponsors. He was captain of Assa Abloy, the second-place finisher. She led the all-woman crew aboard Amer Sports Too, which finished last in the eight-boat race. The couple, based in Hamble, England, announced their plans yesterday.
NEWS
By DENVER POST | April 24, 2005
Just about everything in Aspen, Colo., is a cut above average, so it follows that Aspen's finest should patrol the town's star-studded streets in a ride classier than the usual Ford Crown Victoria police cruisers. Since the 1970s, the 27-officer Aspen Police Department has driven a fleet of Saab sedans. But soon the department plans to trade up to Volvo SUVs, a move echoing nearby Vail, where the Swedish-made Volvo has become the official town vehicle. Aspen Mayor Helen Klanderud said the higher-end police vehicles aren't really about maintaining an upscale image, but rather are an effort to be at the head of the pack environmentally.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race organizers wanted to come to Baltimore in May 2015 as part of their 'round-the-world competition but had one request: Could it share the spotlight with the Preakness Stakes or bump the Triple Crown horse race to another date? The city said thanks, but no way. So Tuesday, the only U.S. stopover of the Volvo went instead to Newport, R.I. "We were shocked," said Robert Housman, executive director of Ocean Racing USA, the Baltimore bidder. "It would be discouraging to work hard on something and lose, but clearly they moved the finish line.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race officials were whisked to the top of the World Trade Center, honored as guests at a reception and squired to the grassy expanse of Fort McHenry during a 24-hour courtship meant to seal the deal to make Baltimore the event's only U.S. port of call in 2015. "I think they wanted validation on some things, and I think we delivered," Terry Hasseltine, executive director of the Maryland Office of Sports Marketing, said Tuesday of the previous day's visit. "We had an open dialogue, and I think it was conveyed to them loud and clear that we have a dynamic team in place.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race officials will visit Baltimore on Monday to evaluate a bid to host the only U.S. stop of the 2014-2015 edition of the round-the-world contest known as the Super Bowl of sailing. Volvo officials are expected to begin announcing the ports along the route next week. Announcements will continue into February. "I really believe we're going to win this thing," said Rob Housman, an executive director of Ocean Racing USA, the private-sector bidder. "The success of Sailabration last summer shows Baltimore knows how to do fantastic water events.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Gregory H. Barnhill, a career investment banker who embraced and promoted hundreds of civic projects and charities, ended his life Friday evening in Baltimore County. He was 59 and lived in Stevenson. "Greg was a very good citizen who always believed in giving back," said former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, a friend. "He was always one of the businessmen to be counted upon in any activity beneficial to Baltimore or to the state. " Mr. Barnhill spent much of his early career with the old Alex.
NEWS
By Les Cohen | September 4, 2011
We're having a baby. By "we," I mean my daughter and her husband. A new baby means, of course, a new child-safety seat for the car. I've been using an old Cabbage Patch doll to make sure I know how this new car seat works. (Remember Cabbage Patch dolls? This one was my daughter's, which my wife insisted we save, in the warehouse we call a basement, for our grandchildren.) The car seat comes with a 68-page manual. The one we got our own kids years ago had, I think, a sticker that said, "Insert baby here," with an arrow: "This end up. " The seat we just bought is a top-of-the-line Britax (pronounced with a long "i")
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
Volvo AB of Sweden said yesterday that it is cutting production and workers at its Mack Powertrain Division plant in Hagerstown to reduce costs because sales of its trucks and buses have dropped. The Hagerstown plant will reduce production of its transmissions by a third and of its engines by 25 percent, said Ilse Ghysens, a plant spokesman. The changes are effective Jan. 25. The cuts were first reported by the Herald-Mail in Hagerstown. "There is a lower demand due to the economic downturn, and we have to adjust," Ghysens said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 10, 1997
LONDON -- New sponsor. Same race.That was the message put out by organizers of one of the world's premier sailing events yesterday with the announcement that Volvo will take over The Whitbread Round The World Race.The 1997-98 event will start on Sept. 21 in Southampton, England, and conclude in May 1998.Maryland remains part of the Whitbread lineup. An 870-mile leg from Fort Lauderdale is due to finish in Baltimore, April 22, 1998.The racers will leave Annapolis May 3, 1998 for a 3,390-mile journey to France.
SPORTS
By Chris Larson | May 4, 2002
Annapolis sailor Chris Larson, tactician aboard ASSA ABLOY, will provide updates during Leg 7 of the Volvo Ocean Race. ABOARD ASSA ABLOY - Wet, wild, and fast! This is the only way to describe Leg 7. The start on Sunday was great as the eight Volvo 60s tacked through the Bay Bridge and down the Chesapeake. Since then, the throttle has been mashed to the floor. Winds have been 20 to 30 knots. We logged 471 miles during one 24-hour period. I think 28.2 knots (32.5 mph) is our fastest speed so far. "Fire hosing" best describes life on board.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | August 15, 2008
Volvo AB of Sweden said yesterday that it would embark on a $50 million expansion and add 50 workers to its Mack Powertrain Division plant in Hagerstown as part of a sweeping restructuring across the company. But the truck maker also announced it would lay off up to three-quarters of its 120 workers at a parts facility in Baltimore as the company moves to streamline some operations. The changes in Maryland are a small piece of a plan outlined by Volvo, which acquired Mack in 2001, that executives said would make the truck company more cost-efficient.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.