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BUSINESS
January 27, 2010
WASHINGTON - A million and a half more Americans volunteered during the span of a year ending in September 2009, a period marked by job losses and a faltering economy. About 63.4 million people ages 16 and older volunteered at least once between September 2008 and September 2009, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That's about a 1.6 million increase compared with the 61.8 million people who helped their communities in 2008, but not as many as the 65.4 million who lent a hand in 2005.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 27, 2013
Now for some good news, and it has nothing to do with the birth of the royal baby. According to a USA Today/Bipartisan Policy Center poll, "Americans by more than 2-1 say the best way to make positive changes in society is through volunteer organizations and charities, not by being active in government. " Even better news: People under 30 are especially put off by politics and are "significantly less likely than their parents to say participating in politics is an important value in their lives.
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EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
Catonsville resident W. Fumiko Campbell, who will step down from her current two-year term as president of the St. Agnes Hospital Auxiliary in March, won two awards for volunteerism in 2012. She received a Geri award from the Maryland Senior Citizens Hall of Fame and an Unsung Hero award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Maryland Chapter. The first emeritus member of the St. Agnes Foundation, Campbell will continue raising money for the hospital, where she has volunteered more than 25,000 hours.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Teamwork is the special sauce of success in any organization. Without it, there would have been no Super Bowl parade for the Ravens on Pratt Street and no renewed buzz about the Orioles' building on last season's remarkable progress. At a broader level, teamwork improves lives and community conditions for all. At United Way of Central Maryland, our mantra is "Give. Advocate. Volunteer. " This week, we celebrate National Volunteer Week, and I ask everyone to join me in thanking the thousands of volunteers across our region who gave of their time last year to improve the lives of others.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | October 21, 1992
Kimiko Arita, a 57-year-old woman from Kanagawa, Japan, and Euclin Mapp, a senior volunteer from Annapolis, found they had a little more in common than they originally thought.Mrs. Arita, who stayed with Mrs. Mapp while touring Maryland to learn about senior volunteerism, is married to a graduate of the Japanese Naval Academy. Mrs. Mapp's son-in-law graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy.The tiny coincidence made her visit even more enjoyable, she said."I enjoyed the stay very much," said Ms. Arita, "We became friends and I would very much like to do it again."
NEWS
April 29, 1997
WHAT A LONG ROAD it has been from Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty" to the "Presidents' Summit on Service" at Philadelphia's Independence Hall this week. The former relied on big money supplied by big government in what is generally regarded today as a failed program; the latter relies on big volunteerism supplied by what President Clinton calls "big citizenship."On the surface this may seem like so much sloganeering, and it really will be just that if there isn't targeted follow-through to rescue an estimated 15 million at-risk young Americans.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | June 15, 1992
Next time you ponder how much technology has improved our lives, consider this: In prehistoric times, it took people 20 hours of work a week to meet their survival needs. So much for the rosy sitcoms of the '50s showing how much leisure we'd all have due to technological advances.The fact is, Americans are working longer and harder than ever before, just to make ends meet. With the advent of the working couple, single-parent families and overachiever schedules, each of us has fewer leisure hours.
NEWS
November 20, 2000
Kreig on state commission that oversees volunteerism Richard M. Kreig, president and CEO of Horizon Foundation, has been named to the state Commission on Service and Volunteerism. The 25-member commission, which reports to Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, oversees a $22.8 million annual budget for programs such as AmeriCorps Maryland, the state's Promise Program which creates "Communities of Promise" for at-risk children and young people, regional volunteer centers and other activities.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | June 20, 1994
For those readers who have not yet seen a copy of "America's Teenagers as Volunteers," stop what you're doing and give a call to Independent Sector in Washington at (202) 223-8100. This little pamphlet is worthwhile reading and should help you in your volunteerism efforts.With funding from Metropolitan Life Foundation, Independent Sector summarized findings from major studies done recently on teen-age volunteers. The results are instructive for those organizations using the skills, talents and energies of teen-agers.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 30, 1992
The Supreme Court has ruled that abortion is the principal electoral issue in every state this year.There is no denying the human spirit. People will go right on living in California as though nothing was going to happen.President Mitterrand was just lucky those Serbian artillerists are brutal but not accurate.If Yugoslavs don't stop killing Yugoslavs, Europe will start doing it.The state is weighing whether to make volunteerism mandatory in the schools, like it used to be in Russia.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
Catonsville resident W. Fumiko Campbell, who will step down from her current two-year term as president of the St. Agnes Hospital Auxiliary in March, won two awards for volunteerism in 2012. She received a Geri award from the Maryland Senior Citizens Hall of Fame and an Unsung Hero award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Maryland Chapter. The first emeritus member of the St. Agnes Foundation, Campbell will continue raising money for the hospital, where she has volunteered more than 25,000 hours.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | December 24, 2012
"Saving the Chesapeake Bay is a test; if we pass we get to keep the planet," wrote Chesapeake Bay Foundation President Will Baker, in the foreword to a book I wrote about 20 years ago for the foundation. The bay, on the doorstep of the nation's capital, polluted by all modern humans do, was as good a place as any to learn if humans could exist sustainably with the rest of nature. What have we learned since that book, "Turning The Tide," was published in 1991? In a revised, 2003 edition, I set out six "Lessons Learned" that looked back over the previous decade.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Philathia Yvonne Reese-Calhoun, former director of community outreach at Maryland New Directions, died Monday of cancer at Northwest Hospital. She was 63. The daughter of a church sextant and a homemaker, Philathia Yvonne Reese was raised in Richmond, Va., the youngest of 11 children. She graduated from Maggie L. Walker High School in 1966. After earning a degree in sociology from Virginia State University in Petersburg in 1970, she went to work for the Commonwealth Girl Scout Council of Richmond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 21, 2010
The homeless who line up for meals from the Our Daily Bread service center in the shadow of the Jones Falls Expressway might receive something in addition to the physical nourishment one Sunday in May. If current plans pan out, they'll hear classical music performed live underneath the overpass by the Be Orchestra, a volunteer group of Peabody Conservatory students. This new ensemble - the title comes from its declared mission to "be involved, be a part" - is the latest manifestation of an activist spirit that seems to have taken deep hold at the school during the past six years or so. Among recent student-initiated projects launched are Creative Access Music Outreach, which takes volunteer musicians into the community; and Junior Bach, with Peabody composition majors helping middle-school boys write music.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010
WASHINGTON - A million and a half more Americans volunteered during the span of a year ending in September 2009, a period marked by job losses and a faltering economy. About 63.4 million people ages 16 and older volunteered at least once between September 2008 and September 2009, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That's about a 1.6 million increase compared with the 61.8 million people who helped their communities in 2008, but not as many as the 65.4 million who lent a hand in 2005.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | January 20, 2007
Anna Marie Landenberger, who worked for much of her 106 years and lived by the words, "Keep your mouth shut and your hands busy," died of a heart ailment Sunday at her Cheswolde home. Anna Marie Lehr was born in Baltimore and raised in the Remington section of North Baltimore. Her father owned and operated a small bakery on 28th Street where her mother and her seven siblings worked. Because the family needed money, she became a textile worker at the old Mount Vernon Mills in the Jones Falls Valley when she was 11 years old. She worked in the cotton mills, where canvas was made, until city authorities intervened and told her mother she must attend school.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | February 15, 1993
With nonprofits stretching every penny to make ends meet, noncash resources have taken on a new allure.In-kind donations of equipment, depreciated furniture and rent reductions each play a part in an organization's survival nowadays. Still, the biggest help to charitable agencies comes in the form of bodies -- good, old-fashioned volunteer help.There's lots of talk in nonprofit professional groups these days concerning volunteers. The volunteer base has been shrinking over the past two decades, as women have returned to the work force full time.
BUSINESS
By LESTER S. PICKER | February 24, 1992
When's the last time you attended a government-sponsored event and found it useful? Or enjoyable? I recently attended a four-hour seminar put on by the Governor's Office on Volunteerism and -- surprise, surprise -- found it enjoyable and informative.With government funding for non-profits at an all-time low, policy-makers are desperately seeking ways to transfer the financial burden to other sectors. One way to fill the public's escalating need for services is by encouraging volunteerism.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 15, 2005
Volunteers are supposed to help. They're not supposed to help themselves to our land and our critters. But that's what has been happening at a few of Maryland's parks. The wheels of change are starting to turn, but why did it take so long? Consider: Wildlife researchers find one of their radio-collared deer dead and hanging behind the house of a Fair Hill Natural Resources Management Area volunteer. The field tag indicates the deer was killed at a time when the telemetry indicates the animal was still alive and mobile.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 2001
WASHINGTON - Marcos Castillo, who handles emergency services for the Red Cross in Maryland, figured that with all the talk of self-sacrifice after the Sept. 11 attacks, he could easily find 30 instructors for a new disaster relief training program serving the Baltimore-Washington area. But after nearly 1,000 phone calls, Castillo managed to lure just 14 volunteers. When orientation began recently, the room was half-empty. "I thought I was going to be getting a lot of responses, but I didn't see that," said Castillo, who had just a month to find people who would immediately serve for a year.
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