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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
The Columbia Association is thinking about expanding its Volunteer Corps into a countywide service, a move cheered by some as a way to build on an effective program, but feared by others as an extension of the association's reach beyond the town's borders. Since 1990, the Volunteer Corps has matched people who want to lend a hand with volunteer opportunities at agencies or charities that serve people who live in Columbia. Under a pilot program that comes before the Columbia Council tomorrow, the focus would widen beyond Columbia to include all of Howard County.
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NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
John Davis peers over the shoulders of the kindergartners as he walks around a desk in Jan Bubnash's class at Carrolltowne Elementary in Sykesville. As a classroom volunteer, he is making sure each child is writing his or her name in the upper-right-hand corner of the day's math assignment. Davis, 78, of Sykesville - known as "Pop" by everyone at the school - has been helping at Carrolltowne nearly every school day for the past 12 years. In addition to helping in the classroom, he has taken on the job of directing bus traffic every morning.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 27, 2001
The Columbia Association has hired a director for its recently expanded volunteer center. Michael-Anne Rubenstien began her job yesterday as head of the Volunteer Center Serving Howard County. The post pays from $36,600 to $59,000 a year. The center matches volunteers with opportunities at agencies or charities serving Howard County. Rubenstien was director of the William R. Butler Volunteer Services Center at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., from 1995 to 2000. She was a volunteer coordinator at the center from 1993 to 1995.
NEWS
By Joseph Eaton and Joseph Eaton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 2004
Tonga will be Peace Corps volunteer Lauren Drexel's home for the next 27 months, while she works on a project to teach schoolchildren about the environment. A 2000 graduate of Bel Air High School, Drexel, 21, is one of several young Harford County residents postponing traditional careers or graduate school for service in the Peace Corps. Five other volunteers from the county are serving in destinations from Malawi to Bulgaria, according to the Peace Corps. By the fall, five other area volunteers will be serving on Peace Corps missions.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2001
The Columbia Association's board of directors has approved a plan to expand its 11-year-old Volunteer Corps into a countywide service. The board, which also serves as the Columbia Council, made the decision Thursday night after seeking a legal opinion on whether the arrangement could increase the association's risk of getting sued. Sheri V.G. Fanaroff, general counsel for the homeowners association, concluded that the risk would not increase. "The conclusion is there is no more risk under this operation than we've had under the last 11 years," council Chairman Lanny Morrison of Harper's Choice said.
NEWS
February 6, 1994
PAT KOUKOUMTZIS, 21, Kings Contrivance, Columbia.Volunteer work: Ms. Koukoumtzis is a sophomore at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. She volunteers with the Service Coordination Systems, an advocacy group to help people with developmental disabilities live their lives as they define them. The organization also offers case management for its participants, and volunteers act as companions.Ms. Koukoumtzis visits Lester Shindledecker, 71, of Owen Brown in Columbia, who is mildly retarded.
NEWS
November 17, 1990
President Bush's signing of the National Community Service Act is welcome indeed. Mr. Bush walked into the White House calling for "a thousand points of light" in volunteer service, but his administration follows one that cut the funding of government agencies coordinating such efforts.National service for young people has been debated extensively for the past two decades. Although it is considered a good idea in the abstract, questions have arisen. Would it amount to a draft for peacetime service only for disadvantaged students who cannot afford tuition fees?
NEWS
December 29, 1992
Dorothy S. Payne, a violinist who volunteered her time to entertain in nursing homes, died of heart failure Dec. 21.Mrs. Payne, 103, had been a resident of the Broadmead Retirement Center in Cockeysville since 1980.Born Dorothy Stanchfield in Denver, Mrs. Payne graduated from high school in Santa Monica, Calif., in 1907.As a youngster, she excelled in swimming and began a lifelong interest in music, eventually learning to play the violin, viola and piano.In 1913, she married Olney R. Payne Sr. in Denver.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
Wilde Lake village needs volunteers to spruce up the community and assist elderly and low-income residents with minor home repairs and maintenance.The village is working with the Columbia Association's Volunteer Corps on the Neighborhood Renaissance Program, which also is aimed at helping qualified Wilde Lake residents comply with the village's property maintenance covenants."
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | January 4, 1994
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world."Margaret Mead's words are symbolic of the efforts of the educators and officials from community service organizations who are working to develop student service learning programs and opportunities for middle school and high school students in Howard County.Beginning with the 1997 high school graduating class, students are mandated by Maryland law to serve 75 hours of community service as a requisite for graduation.
NEWS
By John Bridgeland | October 30, 2003
AS THE MASSIVE cleanup efforts from last month's Hurricane Isabel continue, hundreds of Americans who were injured, lost their homes or were displaced are receiving a helping hand from AmeriCorps members. Last year, AmeriCorps, through the American Red Cross, assisted at least 246,000 people affected by disasters such as hurricanes, floods and wildfires. They helped victims and their families, distributed food and clothing, and recruited and managed volunteers. It is all the more important that Congress provides the full funding President Bush requested to grow AmeriCorps from 50,000 to 75,000 members.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 27, 2001
The Columbia Association has hired a director for its recently expanded volunteer center. Michael-Anne Rubenstien began her job yesterday as head of the Volunteer Center Serving Howard County. The post pays from $36,600 to $59,000 a year. The center matches volunteers with opportunities at agencies or charities serving Howard County. Rubenstien was director of the William R. Butler Volunteer Services Center at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., from 1995 to 2000. She was a volunteer coordinator at the center from 1993 to 1995.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2001
The Columbia Association's board of directors has approved a plan to expand its 11-year-old Volunteer Corps into a countywide service. The board, which also serves as the Columbia Council, made the decision Thursday night after seeking a legal opinion on whether the arrangement could increase the association's risk of getting sued. Sheri V.G. Fanaroff, general counsel for the homeowners association, concluded that the risk would not increase. "The conclusion is there is no more risk under this operation than we've had under the last 11 years," council Chairman Lanny Morrison of Harper's Choice said.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2001
The Columbia Council has given preliminary approval to a plan to expand the Columbia Association's Volunteer Corps into a countywide program, but decided to get legal advice before formalizing the deal. At the urging of Councilman Steven Pine of Kings Contrivance, the council voted unanimously Thursday to seek a legal opinion on whether expanding the volunteer program could increase the CA's risk of getting sued. But Pine and the rest of the council indicated they would probably support the plan even if CA's lawyers find it poses some level of risk.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
The Columbia Association is thinking about expanding its Volunteer Corps into a countywide service, a move cheered by some as a way to build on an effective program, but feared by others as an extension of the association's reach beyond the town's borders. Since 1990, the Volunteer Corps has matched people who want to lend a hand with volunteer opportunities at agencies or charities that serve people who live in Columbia. Under a pilot program that comes before the Columbia Council tomorrow, the focus would widen beyond Columbia to include all of Howard County.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 1998
CHILDREN AT Running Brook Elementary School are getting one-on-one help with reading and math, thanks to a group of about 20 volunteers organized by the Columbia Association's Columbia Volunteer Corps.Part of the association's WeCare Team, the volunteers began working at the school about three weeks ago.Their efforts are being coordinated by volunteers Linda Lazaroff of Hobbit's Glen and Lillian Shapiro of Wilde Lake."It's great to have this enthusiasm," said Jason McCoy, Running Brook's assistant principal.
NEWS
December 4, 1991
The Howard County Republican Club is collecting donations of coats, hats, gloves, socks, underwear, toiletries and non-perishable foods for Christopher's Place, a men's shelter in Baltimore from 9 to 11 a.m. Dec. 14 at Republican Headquarters at 5550 Sterrett Place in Columbia.Information: 740-1530 or 776-1015.DONATE COATS TO NEEDYThe Clarksville Lions is collecting winter coats 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Clarksville Firehall.Area dry cleaners will clean the coats for free.The Lions will distribute the clothing to needy county residents at 12:30 p.m. Dec. 22 at the Florence Bain Senior Center.
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | August 6, 1995
The Volunteer: Sean Oakley,15, "is just really a fine junior member of the junior volunteer corps," said Anne Heil, the volunteer coordinator for Harbor Hospital Center.Sean, who will be a junior at Chesapeake High School, learned about the volunteer program at Harbor through his mother, who works in medical records there.Working about eight hours, two days a week, Sean splits his time at the hospital between two departments. On the fifth floor, in orthopedics, he assists the nursing staff, filling patients' water pitchers, making beds, answering phones and sometimes "it's just a matter of talking to the patients," Sean saidHe also spends time at the hospital's fitness center doing computer entry work for the director.
NEWS
By Tonya Jameson and Tonya Jameson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 1996
When streams need cleaning, the mentally ill need food and at-risk boys need nurturing, who steps in to help? We Can.The We Can team from the Columbia Volunteer Corps meets twice a month to lend a collective hand to a variety of causes, said Sandy Fairhurst, corps director.She formed the team in February after discovering what many other community service groups are learning: Volunteers don't have time for weekly projects."They don't want to make a commitment to a long-term project, but they want to help the community," she said.
NEWS
By Liz Lean and Liz Lean,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 1995
ORGANIZING a Girl Scout troop is harder than it used to be.And there's not one June Cleaver or Donna Stone among the mothers of the 11 fourth- , fifth- and sixth-graders of Troop 443, based at Running Brook Elementary in Wilde Lake. All work -- many are the primary breadwinner -- and some are part-time college students.Every family contributes, said Troop Leader Coanne O'Hern, whose daughter Emily is a sixth-grader at Wilde Lake Middle School.Betty Husain, mother of Ambereen, and Margaret Adams, mother of Kristina, alternate as assistant leader, and others have shared their skills in sewing, crafts and music.
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