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Voluntary Recycling

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NEWS
December 30, 1993
Unattended bins where people can drop off recyclable trash can work, but such voluntary systems are not without problems, as officials in the town of Hampstead are discovering. The recycling bins, unfortunately, are becoming repositories for more than just recyclables and the mess around them is annoying residents.Hampstead is not unique in Carroll County (or elsewhere) in having problems with voluntary trash disposal. Mount Airy's effort to create a community compost pile to handle yard waste in Prospect Park became a smelly eyesore after people began tossing bags of trash, old furniture and other refuse into the pile.
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NEWS
December 30, 1993
When Baltimore County Executive Roger Hayden announced plans early this year to blanket the county with curbside recycling collections by 1995, the volunteers who had manned about a dozen drop-off stations on weekends cheered. The county, like Baltimore city and most of its suburban neighbors, was finally entering the late 20th century in refuse collection. It made little sense that residents had an easier (and cheaper) time throwing away their non-renewable garbage than getting rid of their recyclables.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 23, 1992
Two trash haulers face fines and suspensions of their licenses to operate in Carroll for failing to comply with the county's recycling ordinance, a county official said yesterday.The firms -- Browning Ferris Industries of Baltimore and Benchoff Trash Service of Westminster -- have each been sent a "notice of violation" and have until today to appeal the suspensions, said county Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman.Unless the firms appeal, their licenses to operate in the county will be suspended, effective Jan. 1, he said.
NEWS
December 30, 1993
Unattended bins where people can drop off recyclable trash can work, but such voluntary systems are not without problems, as officials in the town of Hampstead are discovering. The recycling bins, unfortunately, are becoming repositories for more than just recyclables and the mess around them is annoying residents.Hampstead is not unique in Carroll County (or elsewhere) in having problems with voluntary trash disposal. Mount Airy's effort to create a community compost pile to handle yard waste in Prospect Park became a smelly eyesore after people began tossing bags of trash, old furniture and other refuse into the pile.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
The county commissioners boosted their efforts to begin a voluntary recycling program July 1 by awarding a $258,000 contract to a Finksburg firm to operate a collection center for recyclables.Under the five-year contract, Phoenix Recycling Inc. will collect recyclables -- at no cost -- from trash haulers serving the county and from residents at its facility at 2700 Emory Road.The county will pay Phoenix $258,000 to operate the facility and market the recyclables the first year. The final cost could vary, depending on the amount of recyclables collected at the facility, said county Attorney Charles W. Thompson Jr.The contract is based on Phoenix's low bid for the county's initial plan for mandatory recycling.
NEWS
December 30, 1993
When Baltimore County Executive Roger Hayden announced plans early this year to blanket the county with curbside recycling collections by 1995, the volunteers who had manned about a dozen drop-off stations on weekends cheered. The county, like Baltimore city and most of its suburban neighbors, was finally entering the late 20th century in refuse collection. It made little sense that residents had an easier (and cheaper) time throwing away their non-renewable garbage than getting rid of their recyclables.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Everett Ecker Sr., Charles "Tooter" Fritz, Kenneth Grimes, Roy Johnson and Terry Petry (seeking one of three council seats) were asked these four questions:* What do you view as the town's three most immediate needs?* How can New Windsor keep its small town atmosphere as it continues to grow?* Do you believe the county and towns can meet the 1994 mandate for 15 percent recycling? Do you support mandatory or voluntary recycling? Why? How would you meet the costs involved in recycling?* How would you resolve the dispute between the quarry ownersand the residents?
NEWS
August 11, 1991
If the recycling phenomenon hasn't touched your household yet, to steal a phrase from the baseball legend Satchel Paige, "Don't look over your shoulder; it might be gaining on you."That's especially true in Baltimore City and Anne Arundel and Howard counties, where new local budgets that went into effect July 1 include strong pushes for recycling aimed at residential areas.In little more than a month, some form of voluntary recycling on a routine basis will involve all 230,000 single-family homes in Baltimore City.
NEWS
June 4, 1993
Harford County this month completes the first year of its recycling program with a success rate that already meets the 1994 state goal of 20 percent. Buddy Blue Bag, the program's overstuffed mascot, would split a seam.But there is an asterisk attached. The county got the 21 percent grade only with the help of an automatic 5 percent bonus for having the waste-to-energy incinerator in Magnolia.Still, the countywide program is collecting one-third more recyclable material than it did a year ago, over 200 tons a week.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
Bowing to public pressure, the county commissioners say they may scrap mandatory recycling and other aspects of a proposed solid waste program that raised objections from residents and trash haulers."
NEWS
June 4, 1993
Harford County this month completes the first year of its recycling program with a success rate that already meets the 1994 state goal of 20 percent. Buddy Blue Bag, the program's overstuffed mascot, would split a seam.But there is an asterisk attached. The county got the 21 percent grade only with the help of an automatic 5 percent bonus for having the waste-to-energy incinerator in Magnolia.Still, the countywide program is collecting one-third more recyclable material than it did a year ago, over 200 tons a week.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 23, 1992
Two trash haulers face fines and suspensions of their licenses to operate in Carroll for failing to comply with the county's recycling ordinance, a county official said yesterday.The firms -- Browning Ferris Industries of Baltimore and Benchoff Trash Service of Westminster -- have each been sent a "notice of violation" and have until today to appeal the suspensions, said county Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman.Unless the firms appeal, their licenses to operate in the county will be suspended, effective Jan. 1, he said.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Bel Air resident Sharon Penrose started recycling her trash a year ago. Now, she says, "I just can't stop."Her enthusiasm for recycling is one reason Penrose volunteered to be one of the county's "block captains," whose mission is to inform neighbors about the voluntary trash recycling program that starts tomorrow.The captains' duties include distributing blue, plastic bags to hold recyclables and handing out pamphlets to neighbors so they'll understand clearly how Harford's residential curbside recycling program will work.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
The county commissioners boosted their efforts to begin a voluntary recycling program July 1 by awarding a $258,000 contract to a Finksburg firm to operate a collection center for recyclables.Under the five-year contract, Phoenix Recycling Inc. will collect recyclables -- at no cost -- from trash haulers serving the county and from residents at its facility at 2700 Emory Road.The county will pay Phoenix $258,000 to operate the facility and market the recyclables the first year. The final cost could vary, depending on the amount of recyclables collected at the facility, said county Attorney Charles W. Thompson Jr.The contract is based on Phoenix's low bid for the county's initial plan for mandatory recycling.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
Bowing to public pressure, the county commissioners say they may scrap mandatory recycling and other aspects of a proposed solid waste program that raised objections from residents and trash haulers."
NEWS
August 11, 1991
If the recycling phenomenon hasn't touched your household yet, to steal a phrase from the baseball legend Satchel Paige, "Don't look over your shoulder; it might be gaining on you."That's especially true in Baltimore City and Anne Arundel and Howard counties, where new local budgets that went into effect July 1 include strong pushes for recycling aimed at residential areas.In little more than a month, some form of voluntary recycling on a routine basis will involve all 230,000 single-family homes in Baltimore City.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
C. Clinton Becker (unopposed for mayor) and Arthur Moler and Gary Bauer (unopposed for council) were asked these four questions:* What do you view as the town's three most immediate needs?* Considering the anticipated growth in Hampstead, how should thetown assure adequate services for its residents (i.e.: water, roads,fire and emergency services, public facilities)?* Do you believethe county and towns can meet the 1994 mandate for 15 percent recycling? Do you support mandatory or voluntary recycling?
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Dennis Frazier, Samuel V. Greenholtz, Michael Oakes, Rebecca A. Orenstein, Mark S. Snyder, Stephen R. Chapin Sr. and Kenneth A. Yowan (seeking one of three council seats) were asked these four questions:* What do you view as the city's three most immediate needs?* Considering the anticipated growth in Westminster, how should the city assure adequate services for its residents (i.e.: water, roads, fire and emergency services, public facilities)?* Do you believe the county and towns can meet the 1994 mandate for 15 percent recycling?
NEWS
May 5, 1991
C. Clinton Becker (unopposed for mayor) and Arthur Moler and Gary Bauer (unopposed for council) were asked these four questions:* What do you view as the town's three most immediate needs?* Considering the anticipated growth in Hampstead, how should thetown assure adequate services for its residents (i.e.: water, roads,fire and emergency services, public facilities)?* Do you believethe county and towns can meet the 1994 mandate for 15 percent recycling? Do you support mandatory or voluntary recycling?
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Dennis Frazier, Samuel V. Greenholtz, Michael Oakes, Rebecca A. Orenstein, Mark S. Snyder, Stephen R. Chapin Sr. and Kenneth A. Yowan (seeking one of three council seats) were asked these four questions:* What do you view as the city's three most immediate needs?* Considering the anticipated growth in Westminster, how should the city assure adequate services for its residents (i.e.: water, roads, fire and emergency services, public facilities)?* Do you believe the county and towns can meet the 1994 mandate for 15 percent recycling?
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