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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
A new service officer has arrived in Baltimore to promote increased voluntarism addressing the city's most pressing social problems. Vu Dang, 39, who was born in Vietnam and raised in Kentucky, will hold the grant-funded position, a project of the Cities of Service, an organization founded last year in New York City. "Volunteering for me has been a transforming experience," he said Wednesday. "I would like to nurture a service movement for all Baltimoreans, young and old, of all ethnicities and walks of life.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 16, 2011
Dr. Frederick Joseph Hatem, a retired Havre de Grace obstetrician who delivered thousands of babies in Harford and Cecil counties during his four-decade career, including baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. , died June 6 of heart failure at Harford Memorial Hospital. He was 84. Dr. Hatem, whose parents owned and operated a general store, was born in Havre de Grace, where he spent his entire life. He was a 1942 graduate of Havre de Grace High School and served in the Army as an administrative assistant stateside to a colonel, until being discharged in 1946.
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NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
Maryland is one of the wealthiest states in the nation but ranks below average in the number of residents who volunteer. The Governor's Office on Service and Volunteerism is working to change that. Yesterday and Wednesday, it helped sponsor a statewide conference at the Baltimore Convention Center, "Volunteers Make a World of Difference," to celebrate voluntarism and encourage more of it. More than 1,000 people signed up to attend. "To continue to be a strong state, we have to be a giving state," said Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, co-chairwoman of the conference.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 13, 2011
Harriet M. Allen, a retired Harford County public school educator, died April 4 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at the Charlestown retirement community. She was 89. Harriet Morris was born in Baltimore County and raised in Hampstead, where she graduated from Hampstead High School in 1939. After graduating from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1943, she taught high school for two years in Salisbury. In 1963, she earned a master's degree in education from the University of Maryland.
NEWS
April 19, 1991
When President Bush used a "thousand points of light" to describe the benefits of voluntarism, it caught the public's imagination. An off-shoot of that presidential remark has been the private, non-profit Points of Light Foundation, which is enlisting corporate and political heavy-hitters to promote voluntarism during a nationwide campaign this month. On Monday, that foundation honors the efforts of Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development, a church- and temple-based organization that is in the midst of a $24-million undertaking to construct 300 units for low- and moderate-income homebuyers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
In true Boy Scout fashion, Joseph Kochenderfer came prepared to the 21st annual Harford's Most Beautiful People event, which honors voluntarism. When the big moment arrived and Kochenderfer was named the county's top volunteer from among 50 nominees, he had his thank-yous written. After accepting the etched crystal plaque, he reached into his coat pocket and pulled out his notes. "I always told my Scouts, `Be prepared,'" he said to the crowd of about 500 attending the ceremony Thursday at Bel Air Church of the Nazarene.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 28, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- Resting his hands and head on the top of his broomstick, Jason Henderson gazed down a gritty cobblestone street that is typically strewn with broken bottles and litter and said he had never seen it as clean as it was yesterday."
NEWS
By Paula Lavigne and Paula Lavigne,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1998
Community activist Verna L. Jones opened her campaign headquarters yesterday in the same West Baltimore neighborhood where she used to buy snowballs when she was 10.The vacant building she used was a reminder of the poverty and homelessness that moved into her community, she said, and of her pledge to bring economic investment to West Baltimore -- if sent to the House of Delegates in the fall.Jones, 42, announced her candidacy for delegate in the 44th Legislative District yesterday, on a platform of HOPE -- an acronym for health care and housing, opportunity and optimism, public safety, and economic empowerment.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Maryland must mobilize more volunteers to help make the state's children "healthier, safer and better educated," Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend said yesterday, a week before a national summit to promote community service to help youth."
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | February 5, 1994
A couple weeks ago in Annapolis, all on the same day, you could have heard:* The Maryland Farm Bureau boast that its members are making unprecedented progress in voluntarily reducing water pollution.* A leading environmentalist, state Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad, warn that without a law to stiffen their resolve, farmers will never meet bay restoration goals.* Gov. William Donald Schaefer decline to back Mr. Winegrad's proposed law, even as he upbraided farmers for not moving fast or far enough on pollution control.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
A new service officer has arrived in Baltimore to promote increased voluntarism addressing the city's most pressing social problems. Vu Dang, 39, who was born in Vietnam and raised in Kentucky, will hold the grant-funded position, a project of the Cities of Service, an organization founded last year in New York City. "Volunteering for me has been a transforming experience," he said Wednesday. "I would like to nurture a service movement for all Baltimoreans, young and old, of all ethnicities and walks of life.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2010
Brian Meshkin, the father of three young children expected to matriculate through Howard County schools and a volunteer with the district, has announced his candidacy for the school board. If elected, Meshkin, a 33-year-old graduate of Glenelg High School and the University of Maryland, College Park, wants to use cost-efficient initiatives to better prepare students in the county for the global economy. He says that with his background as an entrepreneur and advocate for children, he will work to combat tough economic times while improving the school system's already highly regarded standards.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
In true Boy Scout fashion, Joseph Kochenderfer came prepared to the 21st annual Harford's Most Beautiful People event, which honors voluntarism. When the big moment arrived and Kochenderfer was named the county's top volunteer from among 50 nominees, he had his thank-yous written. After accepting the etched crystal plaque, he reached into his coat pocket and pulled out his notes. "I always told my Scouts, `Be prepared,'" he said to the crowd of about 500 attending the ceremony Thursday at Bel Air Church of the Nazarene.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | July 9, 2007
The percentage of Baltimore-area residents who volunteered their time dropped slightly last year, mirroring a national trend as educated baby boomers grow impatient with unskilled volunteer tasks, according to a federal report being released today. Across the Baltimore metropolitan area, 27.1 percent of the population volunteered at least once in 2006, according to the report by the Corporation for National and Community Service, an independent federal agency. That's a 2.2 percentage point drop from 2005.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
Arthur Ebersberger has a larger-than-life presence in Anne Arundel County. For a living, he's an insurance broker, but it's his crusade for the growth and development of Anne Arundel County that has earned him many accolades, including his most recent - an induction into the Comcast Business Hall of Fame of the Annapolis and Anne Arundel Chamber of Commerce. The four people chosen for the Hall of Fame, which was started last year, are selected on more than their business contributions, said Rick Morgan, a former chairman of the Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
It wasn't until Robert Melville was nominated for Harford County's Most Beautiful People award that many of his friends and even his closest relatives knew the full scope of his volunteer activities. From advocating the importance of health and fitness to cleaning up debris along the Appalachian Trail and the Ma and Pa Heritage Corridor in Bel Air, the list is extensive and speaks to Melville's decades of volunteer work in his community. Now, the retired physical education teacher, coach and administrator for the Harford County Public Schools will represent the county at Maryland's Most Beautiful People reception next month.
NEWS
By Casey Willis and Casey Willis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1999
SIX YEARS ago, Dayton resident Mary Weisman traveled to a large Baltimore hospital, where she was scheduled for an operation.Trying to find the way to the surgery admitting office, Weisman and her husband, Earl, became hopelessly lost in the endless hallways and corridors.The Weismans were rescued by a hospital attendant, but the memory of that day remained.When Mary Weisman read in the newspaper that Howard County General Hospital needed help with a new hospitality program, she volunteered immediately.
NEWS
By Michael S. McPherson & Morton Owen Schapiro | June 4, 1993
HOW much would you pay for the privilege of serving your country?If President Clinton's proposed national service plan gets off the ground, a lot of young people will ask themselves that question.Evidently the designers of the plan must hope the appetite for sacrifice is strong.Here's the deal. To get $5,000 in school loans forgiven, graduates will have to work for a year in national service, with a guaranteed minimum-wage stipend of a little under $9,000, typically in schools, parks, the auxilary police and similar jobs.
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