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NEWS
May 13, 2008
On Friday, May 9, 2008, VOLTAIRE A. HARRIS; survived by a host of family and friends. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at the family owned and operated Howell Funeral Home, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue, from 3 to 7 P.M. The Wake will be held on Wednesday, May 14, 2008, 10:30 A.M. at Community Baptist Church, 5912 Belle Grove Road, Brooklyn Park, MD with funeral service to follow at 11 A.M. Interment King Memorial Park.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 22, 2012
If Justin Bieber or the Rolling Stones suddenly decided to stage an impromptu concert in a public place somewhere in America without a permit, would the authorities ignore it and shrug it off? Doubtful. Even buskers performing in the New York Citysubway system can't play without formal authorization from the city. What about taking such a musical performance into a church? If Jennifer Lopez or Madonna just showed up in a place of worship, stripped down to their skivvies and started dancing around the altar, would that fly in any Western democracy?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 1, 1991
'Candide' When: Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m.; matinees Sundays at 3 p.m. Through March 10.Where: Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St.Tickets: $10-$16.Call: 752-8558.*** Touchstone Theatre's "Candide" is a corny, campy, comical cross between child's play, Monty Python and, of course, Voltaire.You might call it a satire of a satire of a satire. That's because the production -- currently at the Theatre Project -- not only satirizes Voltaire's satire of German philosopher Leibniz, it can also be seen as a takeoff on the 1956 Leonard Bernstein musical, which had a glitzy Broadway revival in 1974.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
On Friday, May 9, 2008, VOLTAIRE A. HARRIS; survived by a host of family and friends. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at the family owned and operated Howell Funeral Home, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue, from 3 to 7 P.M. The Wake will be held on Wednesday, May 14, 2008, 10:30 A.M. at Community Baptist Church, 5912 Belle Grove Road, Brooklyn Park, MD with funeral service to follow at 11 A.M. Interment King Memorial Park.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | March 14, 1995
Although it was hardly the best of all possible "Candide" productions, last weekend's Peabody Opera Theatre mounting of Leonard Bernstein's 1956 opera registered in the two areas that count most: His wonderful score came across briskly, and the libretto based on Voltaire's 18th century novella retained its satirical sting.Just as the titular hero of this opera undergoes many shifts in fortune and locale as he makes his way through life, the opera itself has led many lives since its short-lived debut production.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 28, 2007
La Dame d'Esprit: A Biography of the Marquise du Chatelet Judith P. Zinsser Viking / 400 pages / $24.95 For the past six years, the Bush administration has been almost obsessively anti-science, causing many intellectuals as well as scientists to yearn for the focus on rationality and empiricism that was the keystone of the Enlightenment. There are few more thrilling periods than the Enlightenment and there were few more exciting places to be than France in the Age of Reason. Not since the Greeks had philosophy aspired to such a glorious apex.
NEWS
By J.P. Slavin | February 14, 1994
UNDER THE BONE. By Anne-christine d'Adesky. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 373 pages, $23. Ms. d'Adesky concentrates on an aspect of Haitian life often ignored by other journalists and authors: the plight of the economically bereft Haitian woman. Against nearly JTC insurmountable odds, poor Haitian families are usually housed, fed, dressed and disciplined by the working mother.Ms. d'Adesky's prose is careful and her book intelligently structured, demonstrating an elegant transition from journalist to novelist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 4, 1991
All children play make-believe, but too many of us outgrow it. Touchstone Theatre's whimsical "We All Fall Down" allows grown-ups to take a return journey to the world of let's-pretend in the relatively safe and sophisticated confines of the Theatre Project.The cast consists of two adult actors, Susan Chase and Eric Beatty, who portray children at stages of development ranging from infancy to adolescence.In addition to playing make-believe together, they also go off into their own fantasy worlds.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | March 8, 1991
CANDIDE," Voltaire's satirical masterpiece, is being given hilarious treatment by Touchstone Theatre, on stage at the Theatre Project through Sunday.The four gifted ensemble players -- Bill George, Susan Chase, Eric Beatty, Sara Zielinska -- create dozens of characters in the wink of an eye, taking the hapless Candide, a not quite confirmed optimist, on a broadly comic journey through space and time.Voltaire's novel, published in 1764, expresses the French dramatist, historian and poet's merciless commentary on stupidly blind optimism that can serve as a catalyst for a chain of destructive, catastrophic events.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | March 9, 1995
Candide, the optimistic hero of Voltaire's satiric novella of that name and of the Leonard Bernstein musical theater piece that Voltaire inspired, is a world traveler.Bernstein's "Candide," which will be performed by Peabody Opera Theatre starting tonight, takes its hero from his Westphalian home and plunges him into ever-greater disasters in Paris, Lisbon (where he barely survives the great earthquake), Madrid (where he is beaten and flayed by the Spanish Inquisition), to the New World, to the imaginary world of El Dorado, and finally -- after surviving a shipwreck -- back to Westphalia.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 28, 2007
La Dame d'Esprit: A Biography of the Marquise du Chatelet Judith P. Zinsser Viking / 400 pages / $24.95 For the past six years, the Bush administration has been almost obsessively anti-science, causing many intellectuals as well as scientists to yearn for the focus on rationality and empiricism that was the keystone of the Enlightenment. There are few more thrilling periods than the Enlightenment and there were few more exciting places to be than France in the Age of Reason. Not since the Greeks had philosophy aspired to such a glorious apex.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 24, 2000
"Everything is for the best in this best of all possible worlds," preaches Dr. Pangloss, the fictitious philosopher in Voltaire's 1758 satirical novel, "Candide." Leonard Bernstein's 1956 musical adaptation, however, has not always been considered the best of all possible musicals. The show has had a bumpy Broadway history. The original production closed after only 73 performances. A 1973 environmental staging met with considerably more success, but the 1997 revival also shuttered prematurely.
NEWS
By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,Special to The Sun | September 17, 1995
"The Tortilla Curtain," by T. Coraghessan Boyle. New York: Viking, 355 pages. $23.95It says a lot about T. Coraghessan Boyle's new novel that so many generations of great satirists come to mind when reading it -- from Swift to Twain to Waugh to Woody Allen. Boyle specifically evokes Voltaire: "The Tortilla Curtain" presents a pair of protagonists, one rich, one poor; the poor one, a Mexican illegal immigrant is, tellingly, named "Cndido." And by the end, the picaresque adventures of the new Candide - woeful, well-intentioned, unbelievably unlucky - stack up very well indeed alongside the revered 18th-century predecessor.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | March 14, 1995
Although it was hardly the best of all possible "Candide" productions, last weekend's Peabody Opera Theatre mounting of Leonard Bernstein's 1956 opera registered in the two areas that count most: His wonderful score came across briskly, and the libretto based on Voltaire's 18th century novella retained its satirical sting.Just as the titular hero of this opera undergoes many shifts in fortune and locale as he makes his way through life, the opera itself has led many lives since its short-lived debut production.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | March 9, 1995
Candide, the optimistic hero of Voltaire's satiric novella of that name and of the Leonard Bernstein musical theater piece that Voltaire inspired, is a world traveler.Bernstein's "Candide," which will be performed by Peabody Opera Theatre starting tonight, takes its hero from his Westphalian home and plunges him into ever-greater disasters in Paris, Lisbon (where he barely survives the great earthquake), Madrid (where he is beaten and flayed by the Spanish Inquisition), to the New World, to the imaginary world of El Dorado, and finally -- after surviving a shipwreck -- back to Westphalia.
NEWS
By J.P. Slavin | February 14, 1994
UNDER THE BONE. By Anne-christine d'Adesky. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 373 pages, $23. Ms. d'Adesky concentrates on an aspect of Haitian life often ignored by other journalists and authors: the plight of the economically bereft Haitian woman. Against nearly JTC insurmountable odds, poor Haitian families are usually housed, fed, dressed and disciplined by the working mother.Ms. d'Adesky's prose is careful and her book intelligently structured, demonstrating an elegant transition from journalist to novelist.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 22, 2012
If Justin Bieber or the Rolling Stones suddenly decided to stage an impromptu concert in a public place somewhere in America without a permit, would the authorities ignore it and shrug it off? Doubtful. Even buskers performing in the New York Citysubway system can't play without formal authorization from the city. What about taking such a musical performance into a church? If Jennifer Lopez or Madonna just showed up in a place of worship, stripped down to their skivvies and started dancing around the altar, would that fly in any Western democracy?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 24, 2000
"Everything is for the best in this best of all possible worlds," preaches Dr. Pangloss, the fictitious philosopher in Voltaire's 1758 satirical novel, "Candide." Leonard Bernstein's 1956 musical adaptation, however, has not always been considered the best of all possible musicals. The show has had a bumpy Broadway history. The original production closed after only 73 performances. A 1973 environmental staging met with considerably more success, but the 1997 revival also shuttered prematurely.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
FROM the Do-We-Laugh-or-Cry Department:English teacher Richard Lederer has already published one book about history as it might have been composed by his students at St. Paul's School in New Hampshire. That book, "Anguished English," was based on the factually fractured writings that his students have handed in over the years.It's funny stuff, until you realize that these kids are our future politicians, doctors, lawyers, journalists, etc.Mr. Lederer is coming out with a second book of "Anguished English" (a fact we report with mixed feelings)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 4, 1991
All children play make-believe, but too many of us outgrow it. Touchstone Theatre's whimsical "We All Fall Down" allows grown-ups to take a return journey to the world of let's-pretend in the relatively safe and sophisticated confines of the Theatre Project.The cast consists of two adult actors, Susan Chase and Eric Beatty, who portray children at stages of development ranging from infancy to adolescence.In addition to playing make-believe together, they also go off into their own fantasy worlds.
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