Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVoltage
IN THE NEWS

Voltage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
The city of Baltimore is set to approve a $200,000 settlement with the family of a 14-year-old Randallstown girl who was electrocuted in 2006 while stretching during a church softball game in Druid Hill Park, ending a years-long legal battle. But for Anthony "Bubba" Green, a former Baltimore Colts lineman who is the girl's father, the end of the lawsuit is far from the end of the cause. "We don't want this to happen to anybody else," Green said Tuesday as he choked back tears.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The city liquor board has agreed to let the owner of Club Voltage keep his liquor license, reversing an earlier ruling, on the condition that he not open a bar at the same Southeast Baltimore location. The Board of Liquor License Commissioners said Thursday that owner Louis J. Principio III could keep the potentially lucrative license as long as he does not use it at the site of the huge dance club at the Baltimore Travel Plaza on O'Donnell Street. The board revoked the license in March after complaints about the club inside the old Greyhound bus terminal, including a Dec. 2 shooting on the dance floor.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 8, 1996
More than 2,000 homes and businesses in the Taneytown area had no electrical power for several hours yesterday after a squirrel got into a nearby substation owned by Allegheny Power, said Debbie Beck, a spokeswoman for the utility.The power failure occurred at 8: 45 a.m, and power was restored to all customers by 1: 30 p.m. Beck said 2,780 customers in Taneytown, Keysville and the Route 194 corridor were affected.The substation on Mill Street converts high-voltage electrical power to a lower voltage that can be used by residential and commercial customers, Beck said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Baltimore's liquor board on Thursday revoked the license of a massive Southeast Baltimore dance club, citing incidents in which a patron was shot on the dance floor and the club's owner released pepper spray into a large crowd while riding on a golf cart. The Voltage club, which billed itself as the city's largest, operated out of an old Greyhound bus terminal in the Baltimore Travel Plaza on O'Donnell Street. Voltage, which has been open for about 16 months, ran afoul of police and the liquor board on consecutive weekends in November and into December.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
State utility regulators weighed concerns about balancing safety and cost Thursday, as they considered rules to minimize the risk of accidental electrocution when objects such as streetlights become electrified. The "Deanna Camille Green Regulations" were proposed by parents of the 14-year-old Randallstown girl who was fatally electrocuted when she touched two fences at a Druid Hill Park softball field in 2006. The fences were in contact with an underground wire, and Anthony and Nancy Green want to prevent similar tragedies.
FEATURES
By James Dulley and James Dulley,Contributing Writer | July 17, 1993
Q: I can't afford new energy-efficient appliances now, but with ever higher electric rates, I need to save. Do those inexpensive little "black box" electronic devices improve appliance efficiency?A: You are referring to motor controllers for appliances. Plugging your appliances into inexpensive controllers can make them operate more efficiently than when they were new. A controller can reduce electricity use up to 15 percent, reduce repair calls and increase appliance life.A controller instantaneously monitors the needs of the motor and gives it only enough power to match the load.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 10, 2004
NOT LONG AGO a reader called with a reasonable question. "I'm going on vacation," he said, "and I'm wondering if I should unplug my computer and other equipment while I'm gone." The answer: It can't hurt. In fact, unplugging your gear while you're away can save a lot of grief in a season when thunderstorms pose a danger to virtually everything electronic. But the call reminded me that it's a good time to talk about making sure your computers, printers and other gadgets are protected against electrical surges and spikes - even when they're plugged in. Surges and spikes are brief but spectacular increases in voltage that can fry delicate equipment.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 29, 1991
Unusually powerful sunspot activity over the weekend created a disturbance in Earth's magnetic field yesterday, disrupting electrical systems around North America and putting some utilities on alert.Equipment failed in scattered places, but so far no power losses have resulted. Physicists said the disturbance probably would continue through the week and could intensify as the sun, acting on cues that are mostly invisible to scientists, continued to release bursts of energy.At the Pennsylvania-Jersey-Maryland Interconnection, a utility consortium in Valley Forge, Pa., that serves most of those states plus Delaware and the District of Columbia, a spokesman said that monitoring equipment had detected the disturbance but that no special steps had been taken.
NEWS
By Staff Report | October 27, 1993
The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health office is investigating an accident in Finksburg Monday in which a man was burned when he touched a high-voltage power line.Michael Gower, 25, an employee of Henkels & McCoy Inc., was in critical condition yesterday at the Francis Scott Key Medical Center burn unit in Baltimore. His condition had worsened from Monday, when he was listed in serious condition.Mr. Gower received third-degree burns over 50 percent to 70 percent of his body.Mr. Gower and other Henkels & McCoy employees were working as subcontractors for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and were upgrading a 33,000-volt line to 115,000 volts, a utility spokeswoman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2002
YUP, IT'S HOT. As in really hot. As in heat warnings, and humidity warnings, and air quality warnings. In other words, summer in Baltimore. Along with that heat and humidity and the discomfort they pose comes another irritant - those little lightning flash icons that show up in the daily weather forecast. They mean thunderstorms - and danger to your computer and other delicate electronic gadgets. If you haven't thought about it lately, it's time to make sure you're protected. The first step is to learn a bit about your electronic equipment and why it needs your protection in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | April 24, 2013
The tip came from a Towson student almost finished her sophomore year. A former sorority member who decided Greek Life wasn't for her, the student said Towson could be boring because parties seemed like they were filled with "all of the same people. " But recently, her friends were raving about Voltage Nightclub, the 12,000-square-foot club peculiarly located next to the Baltimore Travel Plaza right outside of Canton. It didn't matter to these students that Voltage, which opened in October, was once a Greyhound terminal or that it's located away from the city's hopping nightlife scenes.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
The city of Baltimore is set to approve a $200,000 settlement with the family of a 14-year-old Randallstown girl who was electrocuted in 2006 while stretching during a church softball game in Druid Hill Park, ending a years-long legal battle. But for Anthony "Bubba" Green, a former Baltimore Colts lineman who is the girl's father, the end of the lawsuit is far from the end of the cause. "We don't want this to happen to anybody else," Green said Tuesday as he choked back tears.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
State utility regulators weighed concerns about balancing safety and cost Thursday, as they considered rules to minimize the risk of accidental electrocution when objects such as streetlights become electrified. The "Deanna Camille Green Regulations" were proposed by parents of the 14-year-old Randallstown girl who was fatally electrocuted when she touched two fences at a Druid Hill Park softball field in 2006. The fences were in contact with an underground wire, and Anthony and Nancy Green want to prevent similar tragedies.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Amtrak service between Washington and New York and Philadelphia and Harrisburg, Pa., was back to normal for the evening rush hour Tuesday after an early-morning service disruption. About 30 Amtrak trains in the Northeast were delayed from 11 minutes to almost two hours Tuesday because of a low-voltage problem. The disruption began shortly before 8 a.m., and power was restored about an hour later. The cause of the outage was under investigation. The outage also disrupted MARC service on the Penn Line, which is operated by Amtrak.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Reporter | July 21, 2008
A 19-year-old contractor for Baltimore Gas and Electric died Saturday night after he fell into a hole he had dug in Severna Park and came into contact with a live power line, Anne Arundel County police said. Thomas Kikas Jr. of Middle River, an electrician trainee with Riggs Distler and Co., was restoring electricity to four homes in the 200 block of Berrywood Drive when he slipped and fell into a hole, about 3 feet deep, where a cable was leaking voltage, according to the president of Riggs Distler, a BGE subcontractor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTERS | August 9, 2007
Temperatures soared to 105 degrees in downtown Baltimore yesterday, turning up the burner on what was already the worst heat wave of the summer and forcing a brownout on the region's power grid. The high of 102 at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport scorched the previous record of 99 degrees for an Aug. 8, set in 1980. It was the hottest day at the airport in more than eight years. Downtown, heat index readings rose to about 120 degrees. There were no immediate reports of deaths in Maryland linked to this latest siege of hot weather.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | July 7, 2005
IN LAST WEEK'S paper, my column was replaced by a box notifying readers that I was on vacation. That was not exactly the truth. What I've been doing with my time off is moving, which is to vacation what a state prison is to a five-star hotel. Still, rooting through two decades' worth of electronic detritus, trying figure out what to keep and what to throw out, can be instructive. Here's one lesson I learned quickly: The devices that are supposed to protect your computer and other sensitive equipment against electronic damage might not be doing their job. In fact, of the two dozen power strips with surge suppressors that I unearthed around our old house as we packed up for the move to a new one, only three still sported lights showing that their protective circuitry was active.
FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 26, 1992
Owners of electronic equipment have a wide choice of protective devices to guard against damaging voltage surges in power lines.The surges, or spikes, are sudden increases in voltage that can originate in electrical lines inside or outside a home from a variety of causes. Electrical storms are the most dramatic source of surges, but an appliance motor shutting off also can cause one.If uncontrolled, surges can damage or ruin electronic devices such as television sets, stereos, videocassette recorders, computers, telephone answering machines, facsimile machines and microwave ovens.
NEWS
By SHERIDAN LYONS and SHERIDAN LYONS,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
When a familiar tree disappears overnight, "it's like a man whose mustache has been shaved off," says Sher Horosko, a community activist and member of Carroll County's Environmental Advisory Council. "You know something is different." Horosko's comments were directed at Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s tree-cutting program along a 9-mile stretch of Route 140 from Finksburg to Westminster. She and other activists, officials and property owners have been criticizing the company's plans for extensive trimming and removal of trees in the area.
BUSINESS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
Lights pulsate as cameras sweep the CNBC set, lightning crackling on a flat-panel screen while booms of thunder punctuate a loud electronic guitar riff. Then a middle-aged man in rolled-up shirt-sleeves flings his chair across the room, gesticulating wildly as he shouts: "Are you reaaddyyy SKIDADDYYY?!?" This is not your father's finance show. It's Mad Money With Jim Cramer, the former hedge fund manager's high-octane hourlong take on the world of stocks. For CNBC, it's a far cry from sedate business fare like Louis Rukeyser's Wall $treet Week, which used to define the genre.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.