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By New York Times News Service | November 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A high-ranking Russian official says that thousands of U.S. prisoners of war captured by the Germans had been transferred to the Soviet Union after World War II and that some were still living in Russia.The official, Dmitri Volkogonov, a military adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia, told a U.S. Senate committee yesterday that more than 22,000 U.S. soldiers had been taken to the Soviet Union from German prisoner-of-war camps.The Russian official said most of the U.S. servicemen were returned to the United States shortly after the war, but that 119 U.S. citizens with Russian, Ukranian or Jewish names were kept behind.
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NEWS
By Lars-Erik Nelson and Lars-Erik Nelson,Special to the Sun | February 25, 1996
"Trotsky: The Eternal Revolutionary," by Dmitri Volkogonov. Translated by Harold Shukman. The Free Press. 560 pages. $32.50 Leon Trotsky is one of the most fascinating and forgotten figures of the 20th century, a fanatic revolutionary who inspired the Russian masses to overthrow their Tsar and kill their priests, who led the Red Army to victory in the Civil War that followed the Bolshevik revolution; who preached global communist revolution, then ran afoul of Joseph Stalin, was hounded from Russia and died a painful death at the hands of an NKVD assassin in Mexico City.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Soviet Union under dictator Josef V. Stalin "summarily executed" some U.S. prisoners after World War II and forced others, some of whom are still alive, to renounce their U.S. citizenship, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said in a letter given to a Senate committee yesterday.But Dimitri Volkogonov, the senior Russian emissary who read Mr. Yeltsin's letter to the Senate Select Committee on POW-MIA Affairs, said no evidence uncovered by Russian investigators indicates that U.S. POWs from Vietnam or the Korean War were transferred to the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 1992
MOSCOW -- The Russian official who was reported to have cleared Alger Hiss of spying for the Soviet Union says that he was "not properly understood," and that he meant to say only that he had found no evidence of the charges in the KGB documents to which he had access.The official, Gen. Dmitry A. Volkogonov, a historian, said that at Mr. Hiss' request he had searched through KGB files for the 1930s and 1940s and found only one mention of Mr. Hiss, in a list of diplomats at the United Nations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 1992
The Russian official who was reported to have cleared Alge Hiss of spying for the Soviet Union has backed off the statement, saying that he was "not properly understood."The official, Gen. Dmitry A. Volkogonov, a military historian who has been closely involved in studying various Soviet-era archives, said that at Mr. Hiss' request he had searched through KGB files for the 1930s and 1940s, and in them he found only one mention of Mr. Hiss, in a list of diplomats at the United Nations."I was not properly understood," he said in a recent interview.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 1992
MOSCOW -- The Russian official who was reported to have cleared Alger Hiss of spying for the Soviet Union says that he was "not properly understood," and that he meant to say only that he had found no evidence of the charges in the KGB documents to which he had access.The official, Gen. Dmitry A. Volkogonov, a historian, said that at Mr. Hiss' request he had searched through KGB files for the 1930s and 1940s and found only one mention of Mr. Hiss, in a list of diplomats at the United Nations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- In the latest chapter of a case that catapulted Richard M. Nixon to national prominence and has divided Americans for more than 40 years, a high-ranking Russian official says a review of newly opened archives clears Alger Hiss of accusations that he ever spied for the Soviet Union."
NEWS
By Lars-Erik Nelson and Lars-Erik Nelson,Special to the Sun | February 25, 1996
"Trotsky: The Eternal Revolutionary," by Dmitri Volkogonov. Translated by Harold Shukman. The Free Press. 560 pages. $32.50 Leon Trotsky is one of the most fascinating and forgotten figures of the 20th century, a fanatic revolutionary who inspired the Russian masses to overthrow their Tsar and kill their priests, who led the Red Army to victory in the Civil War that followed the Bolshevik revolution; who preached global communist revolution, then ran afoul of Joseph Stalin, was hounded from Russia and died a painful death at the hands of an NKVD assassin in Mexico City.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- As this country marks the 50th anniversary of Hitler's invasion, an old, preperestroika one-liner is regaining some of its punch: That the Soviet Union is the only country in the world with an unpredictable history.A team of historians working on a new, 10-volume history of World War II recently produced a sizzling first volume, indicting Josef Stalin in particular and Communist totalitarianism in general for the colossal defeats of the first weeks of the war.Horrified, the Soviet military brass fell back in disarray at first.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- Alger Hiss, the State Department lawyer accused of espionage during the McCarthy era, never spied for the Soviets, says a high-ranking Russian general with access to archives of the former Soviet Union.In a statement given to an American historian and filmmaker who has studied the case, Gen. Dmitri A. Volkogonov, chairman of Russia's military intelligence archives, calls the espionage allegations against Mr. Hiss "completely groundless.""Not a single document, and a great amount of materials have been studied, substantiates the allegation that Mr. A. Hiss collaborated with the intelligence services of the Soviet Union," declares the general.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 1992
The Russian official who was reported to have cleared Alge Hiss of spying for the Soviet Union has backed off the statement, saying that he was "not properly understood."The official, Gen. Dmitry A. Volkogonov, a military historian who has been closely involved in studying various Soviet-era archives, said that at Mr. Hiss' request he had searched through KGB files for the 1930s and 1940s, and in them he found only one mention of Mr. Hiss, in a list of diplomats at the United Nations."I was not properly understood," he said in a recent interview.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | November 22, 1992
No pumpkins were planted at Pipe Creek Farm this year.It would have been fitting had there been a few of the large orange gourds lying in the small plot near the white farmhouse, because 44 years ago evidence hidden in a hollowed-out pumpkin played a pivotal role in a national controversy that continues today.The recent announcement that a search of Russian intelligence archives revealed no evidence that Alger Hiss was a Soviet spy resurrects the debate about evidence that Whittaker Chambers hid on his farm off Bachman Valley Road.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | November 13, 1992
The other day the newspapers gave new prominence to the old story of the trial and conviction of Alger Hiss. This time the headlines told us that Hiss had been ''vindicated'' or ''exonerated'' by new evidence from Moscow.Don't believe it for a minute. The most recent eruption in the Hiss case came from a Russian historian, Dmitri Volkogonov, who searched Soviet archives looking for evidence that in the '30s Hiss supplied classified documents to the Soviets. He found none: ''Not a single document, and a great amount of material has been studied, substantiates the allegations that Mr. A. Hiss collaborated with the intelligence services of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A high-ranking Russian official says that thousands of U.S. prisoners of war captured by the Germans had been transferred to the Soviet Union after World War II and that some were still living in Russia.The official, Dmitri Volkogonov, a military adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia, told a U.S. Senate committee yesterday that more than 22,000 U.S. soldiers had been taken to the Soviet Union from German prisoner-of-war camps.The Russian official said most of the U.S. servicemen were returned to the United States shortly after the war, but that 119 U.S. citizens with Russian, Ukranian or Jewish names were kept behind.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Soviet Union under dictator Josef V. Stalin "summarily executed" some U.S. prisoners after World War II and forced others, some of whom are still alive, to renounce their U.S. citizenship, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said in a letter given to a Senate committee yesterday.But Dimitri Volkogonov, the senior Russian emissary who read Mr. Yeltsin's letter to the Senate Select Committee on POW-MIA Affairs, said no evidence uncovered by Russian investigators indicates that U.S. POWs from Vietnam or the Korean War were transferred to the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 30, 1992
NEW YORK -- Shaking, leaning on a cane but speaking with rock-solid conviction, 87-year-old Alger Hiss presented evidence yesterday that he claims exonerates him from charges he was a Soviet spy.Unable to stand to address the throng of reporters who had come back to see him after years of absence, Mr. Hiss spoke in a wavering voice of the 44 years he spent trying to prove his innocence and overturn his 1950 conviction for perjury: "I believed that eventually...
NEWS
By Celestine Bohlen and Celestine Bohlen,New York Times News Service | September 25, 1992
MOSCOW -- Stalin advised Communist leaders in China and Korea to hold back 20 percent of U.S. pilots captured during the Korean War and use them as bargaining chips with the United States, according to documents drawn from Soviet archives officially delivered to the U.S. government yesterday.Accounts of these conversations were included in a thick file handed over to former U.S. Ambassador Malcolm Toon, here in Moscow on his third trip as co-chairman of a joint commission investigating the fate of POW's and other Americans held in the Soviet Union after World War II.The file also contains documents from the interrogation, conducted in the presence of Soviet security forces, of 54 U.S. pilots held in Korea and China, said Gen. Dmitri Volkogonov, a military historian who is Mr. Toon's counterpart on the commission.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 30, 1992
NEW YORK -- Shaking, leaning on a cane but speaking with rock-solid conviction, 87-year-old Alger Hiss presented evidence yesterday that he claims exonerates him from charges he was a Soviet spy.Unable to stand to address the throng of reporters who had come back to see him after years of absence, Mr. Hiss spoke in a wavering voice of the 44 years he spent trying to prove his innocence and overturn his 1950 conviction for perjury: "I believed that eventually...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- Alger Hiss, the State Department lawyer accused of espionage during the McCarthy era, never spied for the Soviets, says a high-ranking Russian general with access to archives of the former Soviet Union.In a statement given to an American historian and filmmaker who has studied the case, Gen. Dmitri A. Volkogonov, chairman of Russia's military intelligence archives, calls the espionage allegations against Mr. Hiss "completely groundless.""Not a single document, and a great amount of materials have been studied, substantiates the allegation that Mr. A. Hiss collaborated with the intelligence services of the Soviet Union," declares the general.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- In the latest chapter of a case that catapulted Richard M. Nixon to national prominence and has divided Americans for more than 40 years, a high-ranking Russian official says a review of newly opened archives clears Alger Hiss of accusations that he ever spied for the Soviet Union."
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