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NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | November 24, 1992
A movie cameraman has been rescued from the mouth of a Hawaiian volcano, two days after a helicopter crash stranded him inside the smoldering crater.A brief break in the weather yesterday gave a Maui helicopter pilot just enough time to spot Michael Benson, 42, inside Kilauea Volcano's Pu'u O'o vent, and lower a safety net to him, officials with the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park said."
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NEWS
October 7, 2010
Warm tropical beaches, stunning island views of the Pacific Ocean, near-perfect weather. Maryland doesn't have any of these things, so small wonder that Hawaii has the most millionaires per capita in the U.S., according to a recent survey. Who is No. 2? It appears reports of widespread desertion by Maryland's rich are greatly overstated. The annual accounting by The Phoenix Affluent Marketing Service crowns Maryland runner-up for the prize. For those keeping score at home, that's at least four years in a row that Maryland has held one of the top five spots in the country.
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NEWS
By Kevin Phillips | November 8, 1994
Bethesda -- TODAY, the angry volcano that is the American electorate will rumble. The eruption will be only partial, but the image is apt.The citizenry is smoldering, not knowing whether to quit voting in disgust or blow up in anger. And 1994 is only a beginning, more upheaval is coming.Part of the anger stems from concerns that the choice between Democrats and Republicans is too limited. Fifty-five to 60 percent of Americans would like a third party, according to surveys; that's a higher percentage than will bother to vote.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Visions of the Iceland volcano spewing ash into the air and weary, grounded travelers waiting it out at airports are causing more people to consider travel insurance. Insurers and agents say queries about policies to protect against flight cancellations and delays are sky- high. InsureMyTrip.com, which compares and sells policies, received its second-highest number of calls during the week of April 19th, days after Eyjafjallajokull erupted. (The busiest week for the 10-year-old site was after the swine flu outbreak in August.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | January 26, 2008
Researchers have discovered the first evidence of a volcano under the ice in West Antarctica - a mountain that erupted about 2,300 years ago and still might be generating enough heat to speed up glacial melting. The blast ripped through thousands of feet of ice and sent ash eight miles into the sky. The ash settled in a giant ellipse and, over the centuries, was buried in snowfall, undetected until scientists spotted it in radar images from a series of airplane flights. The extent of the ash, its thickness and its depth beneath the ice's surface allowed the researchers to calculate the size and date of the eruption, according to the report being published tomorrow in the journal Nature Geoscience.
NEWS
January 2, 1993
GREENBELT -- A spidery robot named Dante began inching its way down into an Antarctic volcano yesterday in a daring New Year's display of technology delayed earlier by cold weather and an unexpected eruption.But a computer glitch at the project's base camp brought Dante to a halt after the vehicle had traveled only about 21 feet. The setback dampened the initial excitement over the descent."Everybody watching it here is real excited," said Randee Exler, a spokeswoman at the Goddard Space Flight Center where scientists gathered to watch TV pictures transmitted by the robot.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | January 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Even if the world drastically curtails the use of ozone-destroying chemicals, a large volcano could touch off a catastrophic worldwide ozone loss sometime in the next 20 or 30 years, scientists warned last month.A volcano similar in size to the 1982 El Chichon eruption in Mexico would accelerate chemical reactions between ozone and millions of tons of chlorofluorocarbon chemicals that will continue to float in the atmosphere for years after use of the substances has ended, said Guy F. Brasseur, a physicist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 28, 1990
MASAYA, Nicaragua -- Under billowing white clouds in a chunk of God's country, Nicaraguans sit at the rim of an ancient volcano in moments of solitude and escape from the political bickering and despair of the cities below.Sometimes joined by tourists, they straddle a safety wall, huddle in couples or small clusters and gaze, sometimes for hours, at the volcano's smoky, rock-strewn bowels."It is time to forget our pain, at least for a while," said Jose Rivas, a waiter who said he often brings his wife and children here.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 4, 1994
MOSCOW -- The eruption of the remote Klyuchevsky Sopka volcano in Russia's Far East is starting to subside now, but at its height it was a stupendous display of sheer, raw power.Over the weekend, the 15,584-foot volcano threw lava fountains as high as three miles above the crater rim and ash nearly 13 miles into the atmosphere, geologists said."That's spectacular," said Tom Miller, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Anchorage, Alaska. In a telephone interview, Dr. Miller said that he had been keeping in close touch with Russian geologists near the scene.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | March 28, 2008
Here we are, ignorant peasants in our mud huts at the base of the volcano of finance, begging the gods to spare us as the ground shakes beneath our feet and economists examine the entrails of pigeons and the shamans of the Federal Reserve fling handfuls of sacred powder into the steaming crater. We live with a system rejiggered by Republicans - freedom from regulation, but when the manure hits the ventilator, the Feds step in with a few hundred billion to rescue the players - and nobody can tell us ignorant savages how rough the upheaval might be. Nobody knows.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
Patricia Bolgiano , of Sparks , asks, " With the [Iceland] volcano erupting, would that have an effect on the hurricane season? I heard something about volcanoes emitting so much soot and ash that it caused a very cool summer one year ." Eruption of Indonesia's Tambora volcano in 1815 caused the "Year Without a Summer" in 1816, an agricultural disaster in Europe and North America. As disruptive as it's been, the eruption of Eyjafjallajokull has so far been too small to have a global climate impact, scientists say.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2009
AT&T Mobility sues Md. company over phone calls AT&T Mobility has named a Maryland company among nine nationwide that it accuses of violating federal law by using automated dialers to make millions of unsolicited car warranty calls to its wireless customers. According to the complaint, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, Baltimore-based Volcano Leads was associated with more than 8.4 million calls made from 207-925-1732 between November 2008 through January 2009. AT&T seeks to stop these companies from calling its customers, a violation of the federal Telephone Consumer Protection Act. It's also seeking damages of $1,500 for each knowing violation.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | January 1, 2009
Minnesotans are a humorous people, and we are attempting to elect a comedian to the U.S. Senate, which is delicate work, as you might guess. You shouldn't sweep a comedian into office on a wave of public adulation any more than you should let him win the heroine in the first reel and fly off to Paris and suddenly start ordering meals in fluent French. You need him to move a piano up a long flight of stairs, and that's what Al Franken is doing now. He is leading the race by 50 votes or so out of 2.9 million cast.
TRAVEL
By Glenn Fawcett and Glenn Fawcett,glenn.fawcett@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
As we drove up, down and around Costa Rica's twisty mountain roads, edging bicyclists and pedestrians on the path to the small town of La Fortuna, I realized the sun was going to set much sooner than I had thought. After a full day of travel, we were still miles from our destination. Driving unfamiliar terrain in a foreign country that seems to eschew street signs had put us behind in our goal of reaching our lodging near the base of an active volcano before nightfall.
TRAVEL
By Hugo Martin and Hugo Martin,Los Angeles Times | March 30, 2008
COUGAR, Wash. -- In the dark, foggy shroud of an early fall morning, headlamps cast eerie lights on the faces of a dozen or so hikers lingering at a trail head that leads to the summit of the most active volcano in the continental U.S. The shadowy silhouettes of Douglas and Pacific silver firs border the circular trail head, known as Climbers' Bivouac. Towering overhead, somewhere in the darkness, lurks the angelically named peak that in 1980 unleashed America's worst volcanic disaster.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | March 28, 2008
Here we are, ignorant peasants in our mud huts at the base of the volcano of finance, begging the gods to spare us as the ground shakes beneath our feet and economists examine the entrails of pigeons and the shamans of the Federal Reserve fling handfuls of sacred powder into the steaming crater. We live with a system rejiggered by Republicans - freedom from regulation, but when the manure hits the ventilator, the Feds step in with a few hundred billion to rescue the players - and nobody can tell us ignorant savages how rough the upheaval might be. Nobody knows.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | May 26, 1997
SANTIAGO XALITZINTLA, Mexico -- In this impoverished farming village at the foot of the Popocatepetl volcano, shaman Antonio Analco takes residents on mountainside pilgrimages with offerings of fruit, wine and music.They chant, scream and shout in homage to the majestic 17,887-foot Popocatepetl, which means "smoking mountain" in TC their native Nahuatl, then trek back to indigenous communities where the elderly still speak the language of the Aztec empire. According to local lore, the spirit of Popocatepetl is married to Ixtaccihuatl, which means "Mountain of the white woman," a smaller, dormant volcano north of here.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1996
After shootings, dozens of fights, scores of calls to police and the recent slayings of two college students outside the East Baltimore nightclub, Volcano's is closed. But Mary Ross, a community activist who has long sought to make the neighborhood safer, says she is sorry to see the club go."I'm a mother myself, and I really feel terrible about the murders," says Ross, a resident for more than two decades and community coordinator for the Johnston Square Community Development Corp. "But -- how can I say this?
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | January 26, 2008
Researchers have discovered the first evidence of a volcano under the ice in West Antarctica - a mountain that erupted about 2,300 years ago and still might be generating enough heat to speed up glacial melting. The blast ripped through thousands of feet of ice and sent ash eight miles into the sky. The ash settled in a giant ellipse and, over the centuries, was buried in snowfall, undetected until scientists spotted it in radar images from a series of airplane flights. The extent of the ash, its thickness and its depth beneath the ice's surface allowed the researchers to calculate the size and date of the eruption, according to the report being published tomorrow in the journal Nature Geoscience.
FEATURES
August 27, 2007
Aug. 27 1883 The island volcano Krakatoa blew up; the resulting tidal waves in Indonesia's Sunda Strait claimed some 36,000 lives in Java and Sumatra.
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