Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVoigt
IN THE NEWS

Voigt

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 7, 2008
Allison Marie Voigt, daughter of John and Joan Voigt of Ellicott City and Anthony Edward Giampapa, son of Michael and Jane Giampapa of Walkersville, MD were married June 28, 2008 at the Memorial Chapel on the campus of the University of MD, from which both graduated in 2007. Friends Sara Masuilis and David Schanuel were the Maid of Honor and Best Man. Following a honeymoon in Mexico the couple resides in Germantown, MD. The bride is an elementary school teacher for Montgomery County Schools and the groom is a project engineer for John J Kirlin, LLC in Rockville.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
Celebrated soprano Deborah Voigt has withdrawn from Washington National Opera's season-opening production of Wagner's "Tristan und Isolde" a week before the first performance. She will be replaced by Ireene Theorin on Sept. 15, 18, 21, and 24, and by Alwyn Mellor for the final performance Sept. 27. Here's Voigt's statement, released by WNO: "Returning to a role that I love but haven't sung in a number of seasons, and encountering its unique challenges, has caused me to reconsider keeping it in my repertoire,.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 18, 1991
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director David Zinman is a good judge of talent. So when an opportunity came yesterday afternoon at Temple Oheb Shalom to hear Deborah Voigt, whom Zinman described in conversation a few weeks back as the "next great Verdian soprano," it was hard to resist.After listening to Voigt, 30, for less than 40 minutes (the Tchaikovsky Competition-winning soprano shared the program with other young contest winners in a concert sponsored by the Yale Gordon Trust), it was hard to disagree with Zinman's assessment.
NEWS
September 7, 2008
Allison Marie Voigt, daughter of John and Joan Voigt of Ellicott City and Anthony Edward Giampapa, son of Michael and Jane Giampapa of Walkersville, MD were married June 28, 2008 at the Memorial Chapel on the campus of the University of MD, from which both graduated in 2007. Friends Sara Masuilis and David Schanuel were the Maid of Honor and Best Man. Following a honeymoon in Mexico the couple resides in Germantown, MD. The bride is an elementary school teacher for Montgomery County Schools and the groom is a project engineer for John J Kirlin, LLC in Rockville.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1995
Reserve outfielder Jack Voigt could see it coming and so could everybody else, but the Orioles waited until just two hours before baseball's ad hoc roster reduction deadline to announce that Voigt had been designated for assignment.Now the club has 10 days to trade him, release him or try to pass him through waivers for the purpose of outrighting him to the minor-league system. The move left an opening on the 40-man major-league roster, but the team immediately filled it with Rochester Red Wings left-hander John Shea.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1994
The box score from yesterday's Orioles-Detroit Tigers game will show doubles, errors, strikeouts and the like, all of which contributed to the 11-5 Baltimore victory.But a seemingly simple tag-up play, sending a runner from first to second, doesn't make the box score, yet was the game's pivotal moment.Those are the moments that utility man Jack Voigt seems to specialize in, those not-so-flashy, but nonetheless important occasions that can help break open a tight game.Next to pitcher Scott Klingenbeck, the Double-A Bowie Baysox call-up who got the win in his big-league debut, Voigt was the man of the hour yesterday, all just for taking advantage of a sleeping Tiger.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | August 27, 1993
So, here was the deal: leading run on third base, one out, bottom of the eighth, Jack Voigt pinch hitting . . . and thinking about what, you ask? The 100-degree heat? The AL East standings? The pitcher's curveball? What Bill Clinton and Jackie O. really talked about on that boat?Not! Incorrect-a-mundo!Voigt, the Orioles' 27-year-old rookie, handyman and chatterbox (not in that order), was thinking about a conversation he had two years ago in Rochester with the immortal Benny Distefano.(Which Benny Distefano, you ask?
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
It appears Jack Voigt will be the final player trimmed from the Orioles' roster by today's midnight deadline, and the third-year utility man is not happy about it."It's really gotten to the point where I feel it's unfair to classify me as someone who's a borderline-type player," Voigt said. "It seems like every time something comes up everyone looks at me."After yesterday's 3-1 loss to Cleveland, the Orioles placed center fielder Andy Van Slyke on the 15-day disabled list and optioned right fielder Jeffrey Hammonds to Double-A Bowie.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
All things considered, outfielder Jack Voigt acknowledged after the Orioles traded him to Texas for minor-league pitcher John Dettmer yesterday, everything worked out for the best.Voigt wasn't playing for the Orioles, and his new general manager (Doug Melvin) and manager (Johnny Oates) know him and want him. In fact, Voigt, who had one at-bat in the first three weeks of the season for the Orioles, was in the starting lineup for the Rangers last night, going 0-for-3 and striking out twice.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 19, 2002
Nice weather you have in D.C.," Deborah Voigt said, unfolding a fan and trying to stir up a little air in between songs. The extraordinary soprano must have been miserable up there on the stage at the French Embassy, where she made her Washington recital debut Wednesday night presented by the Vocal Arts Society. It wasn't so great for the audience either, as something vaguely suggesting air-conditioning rumbled ineffectually in the background. The freakish heat wave could not dampen the crowd's enthusiasm, but it may have accounted for the singer's occasional slips of intonation, tone control and even memory during the unusual, fascinating program.
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | July 22, 2007
The Chesapeake Area Professional Captains Association, which offers lectures, workshops, license-renewal courses, and safety and fire-prevention classes, will meet at 7 p.m. tomorrow at the Hampton Inn, 124 Womack Drive in Annapolis. Prospective members, guests and family members are welcome. Information: 410-267-7651 or www.capca.net. Entrepreneurs to hold barbecue Young Entrepreneurs and Professionals, a group of business-minded individuals from the West and Northern Anne Arundel County chambers of commerce, will hold a poolside barbecue mixer from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at the Lodge of Seven Oaks, 2027 Odens Station Lane in Odenton.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | April 7, 2007
The girl with auburn hair wears chocolate nail polish now and mascara and eyeliner. For two years, she has been dating a man she plans to marry. Kimberly Voigt, 17, seems all grown up, so different from the 11-year-old who watched her brother fight for his life at the Ronald McDonald House in downtown Baltimore. "My mom says I never cried when he was sick," said Kimberly, whose brother, R.J. Voigt, died of cancer at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in 2003. The Sun told the 12-year-old's story in a series about families seeking heroic measures to extend the lives of seriously ill children.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | January 20, 2007
Seeking an escape from the at-long-last cold front? You need head no farther south than Washington, where the National Symphony Orchestra is offering a sizzling concert version of Richard Strauss' Salome. Thursday night's performance at the Kennedy Center easily added up to one of the season's hottest events, and the repeats today and Monday have "don't miss" written all over them. Salome will be repeated at 1:30 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Monday at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues Northwest, Washington.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
For a short time yesterday, Johns Hopkins Children's Center patient Bradley Shipley got to be just another toddler in a toy store, albeit one set up in a hospital conference room for young patients like him. "I got a puppy," Bradley, 3, said through the green surgical mask that protected his nose and mouth, holding up the white Lil' Snoopy he selected from a room bursting with about 500 toys. The scene was much like Michele Voigt had envisioned. Her son, R.J. Voigt, died of cancer in this hospital in 2003.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2005
City police have charged a registered child sex offender with strangling a 36-year-old woman whose body was discovered last week in a large safe at a South Baltimore company. Oswald V. Voigt, 48, of Halethorpe was charged with murder and assault in the death of Robin Hoey, a Southwest Baltimore resident. He also faces attempted murder charges in Anne Arundel County, after he was accused last week of threatening his sister in her Glen Burnie home. Police were called to Safes & Security Systems Inc. on Aug. 9 after the owner saw blood on the floor and noticed a foul odor.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2005
MULHOUSE, France - Lance Armstrong happily relinquished his yellow jersey yesterday, handing over the honor of being No. 1 at the Tour de France to German Jens Voigt. But with the honor comes the pressure of defending the sunny shirt. Armstrong and his weary Discovery Channel teammates seemed content to give the role of leader to Voigt and his CSC teammates after yesterday's ninth stage, a 106.3-mile roller-coaster trip up and down six big hills through the Vosges mountains of eastern France.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
More often than not, a sacrifice bunt turns out to be just that -- the sacrifice of an out.However, there are rare instances, when the execution is perfect on the offensive end, that the play becomes the key factor not only in an inning, but also in a game. Such was the case for the Orioles in Monday night's 4-1 win over the Toronto Blue Jays.Even though Jack Voigt's seventh-inning bunt single didn't produce the big inning it could have, it did set up what proved to be the winning run. And it should be pointed out that although the "book" dictated a sacrifice attempt in that situation, it wasn't manager Johnny Oates' first strategical choice.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Staff Writer | August 7, 1993
When Jack Voigt learned on the last day of spring training that he would begin the season in Rochester, rather than with the Orioles, he looked manager Johnny Oates straight in the eye -- and thanked him.Voigt wasn't thrilled with the idea of going back to Triple-A, but he didn't figure to stay there long. Though he hadn't stuck with the Orioles, he had done something almost as important.He had gotten noticed."Johnny was open with me," Voigt said. "He told me that he felt I deserved to stay in the big leagues, but they just didn't have room."
NEWS
By DIANA K. SUGG and DIANA K. SUGG,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
No one knew why the boy started shimmying, going for the corners of his hospital bed. R.J. Voigt was suddenly restless, agitated. The 12-year-old kept calling out for his mom. But he didn't seem to know what he wanted. She kept asking the doctors, "Is this a sign?" His mother, Michele Voigt, grew afraid to leave his room or fall asleep for just a minute, for fear she would miss the moment. She knew there were many ways R.J.'s life could end: stroke, cardiac arrest, even the tumors eating away at the arteries in his neck.
NEWS
By DIANA K. SUGG | December 20, 2004
The summer storm had been brewing for hours. From his hospital bed, R.J. Voigt looked out the tall window and watched the lightning streak across the gray sky. "One Mississippi, two Mississippi," the 12-year-old counted, waiting for the thunder he knew would come. The loud, rattling storm would be there soon, but for now, it was four beats away. In that corner room at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, a junior microscope and comic books were kept near the oxygen equipment. In the closet, medical supplies and R.J.'s fudge stripe cookies were stacked side by side.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.