Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVoice Of America
IN THE NEWS

Voice Of America

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2008
Leonard Reed, a broadcast journalist with the Voice of America in the 1950s and 1960s and later a freelance writer whose work appeared in Harper's magazine, Washington Monthly and the Washington Post, died of colon cancer Friday at his home in Chevy Chase. The Montgomery County resident was 90. Born in Montgomery, Ala., in 1918, Mr. Reed graduated from New York University in 1939. He served on a Navy minesweeper in the North Atlantic during World War II, and later as a commanding officer of a submarine chaser in the Pacific.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2008
Leonard Reed, a broadcast journalist with the Voice of America in the 1950s and 1960s and later a freelance writer whose work appeared in Harper's magazine, Washington Monthly and the Washington Post, died of colon cancer Friday at his home in Chevy Chase. The Montgomery County resident was 90. Born in Montgomery, Ala., in 1918, Mr. Reed graduated from New York University in 1939. He served on a Navy minesweeper in the North Atlantic during World War II, and later as a commanding officer of a submarine chaser in the Pacific.
Advertisement
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 9, 2000
CHICAGO -- Wojciech Minicz, Zdenek "Zenny" Sadlon and Michael Joyce are local radio reporters with huge and loyal followings, but their voices are unfamiliar to the vast majority of Chicagoans. The three are based here with the Voice of America and have long helped broadcast stories of Chicago's diverse immigrant communities and of American political and cultural life to millions of people in Eastern Europe and Asia where the traditions of state-controlled media run deep. In 1989, Minicz told Poles about the U.S. travels of Lech Walesa, leader of the Polish Solidarity movement, who pleaded for aid for Poland.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Voice of America, the government-sponsored news organization that has been on the air since 1942, broadcasts in 44 languages - 45 if you count Special English. Special English was developed nearly 50 years ago as a radio experiment to spread American news and cultural information to people outside the United States who have no knowledge of English or whose knowledge is limited. Using a 1,500-word vocabulary and short, simple phrases without the idioms and cliches of colloquial English, broadcasters speak at about two-thirds the speed of conversational English.
NEWS
May 24, 1996
AMONG AMERICA's Cold War propaganda investments, one of the best was Willis Conover, who spun jazz and swing records on the Voice of America for 41 years. He was strictly music and never uttered a word of politics. But to millions around the world, Mr. Conover, who died recently at 75, came to represent everything that was admirable about the American way of life.Mr. Conover's baritone voice was as instantly distinguishable as a saxophone solo by Paul Desmond or Stan Getz. That voice and his nightly broadcasts made him a celebrity, particularly in Iron Curtain countries.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
The Taliban, Afghanistan's ruling clique of Muslim clerics, have become famous for trying to stamp out every trace of Western culture, banning music, the Internet and foreign publications. The average Afghan has no access to television, and universities have been shut down. Still, determined Afghans are able to find news. They get it from a source that represents everything the Taliban hate most: the Voice of America. An astonishing 60 percent of Afghan men say they listen to the U.S. news agency every day. The VOA, along with the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Voice of America, the government-sponsored news organization that has been on the air since 1942, broadcasts in 44 languages - 45 if you count Special English. Special English was developed nearly 50 years ago as a radio experiment to spread American news and cultural information to people outside the United States who have no knowledge of English or whose knowledge is limited. Using a 1,500-word vocabulary and short, simple phrases without the idioms and cliches of colloquial English, broadcasters speak at about two-thirds the speed of conversational English.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | August 5, 1993
When I was a child I used to walk in the evening through the cobblestone streets of my old Transylvanian town and see the shadows of people huddled around radios behind carefully shuttered windows.They were listening to the sounds of the only truth available to them in those dark years of Stalinism: the voices of Radio Free Europe and the Voice of America. As I grew up, it became obvious to me that everyone was listening, even the communists who had banned those stations.It was said that drastic penalties accrued to anyone caught listening, but in the whispered exchanges between friends and neighbors or in the endless lines for bread and milk, one heard only the news from those faraway posts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004
SPRINGFIELD, Va. M-y On a blue-and-orange paneled set in a gleaming new television studio, the U.S. government is hard at work here trying to win the hearts and minds of people throughout the Arab world. From this studio in an office park off Interstate 95, Lebaneseborn Mouafac Harb directs coverage of world events by government- owned and operated Alhurra satellite television, as well as its sister service, Radio Sawa, which has its headquarters several miles north in Washington. On any given day, Harb might oversee stories on elections in India, treatment of Muslims in Europe, or the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
NEWS
April 19, 2005
THE RECENT news that Voice of America is transferring much of its overnight news operation from Washington to China says much about the perceived value of the American-funded international broadcasting service to the very government whose interest in spreading democracy it is supposed to serve. How unfortunate that after 63 years of bringing news to remote corners around the world and to countries where the flow of information is tightly controlled or filtered by totalitarian governments and one-party regimes, VOA's operation will be located in a communist country with a history of jamming VOA's broadcasts and of expelling those of its journalists who reported critically on government actions.
NEWS
By ED WARNER | March 23, 2006
The enemy media fire hard and fast, said Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld in a recent speech, and we must return the fire just as fast. As an example, he cites the extensive coverage of the prisoners at Abu Ghraib. Why not respond, he asks, by reporting on the mass graves of Saddam Hussein's victims - torture answering torture, as it were. And non-journalists may have to paid to do the job. It is a kind of shock and awe of the media, a crucial part of the war on terror. The Voice of America, to be sure, does not do this, and therein lies the problem.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2005
Have Jewish Americans influenced American literature more than other groups in the past 50 years? When one considers the literature of post-World War II America, the answer appears unequivocal: Arthur Miller, Allen Ginsberg, Saul Bellow, Norman Mailer, Joseph Heller, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Lillian Hellman, Cynthia Ozick, Susan Sontag, E.L. Doctorow. The works of these writers had phenomenal impact; their keen and often brazen deconstruction of postwar America shattered complacency well beyond the literary canon.
NEWS
April 19, 2005
THE RECENT news that Voice of America is transferring much of its overnight news operation from Washington to China says much about the perceived value of the American-funded international broadcasting service to the very government whose interest in spreading democracy it is supposed to serve. How unfortunate that after 63 years of bringing news to remote corners around the world and to countries where the flow of information is tightly controlled or filtered by totalitarian governments and one-party regimes, VOA's operation will be located in a communist country with a history of jamming VOA's broadcasts and of expelling those of its journalists who reported critically on government actions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004
SPRINGFIELD, Va. M-y On a blue-and-orange paneled set in a gleaming new television studio, the U.S. government is hard at work here trying to win the hearts and minds of people throughout the Arab world. From this studio in an office park off Interstate 95, Lebaneseborn Mouafac Harb directs coverage of world events by government- owned and operated Alhurra satellite television, as well as its sister service, Radio Sawa, which has its headquarters several miles north in Washington. On any given day, Harb might oversee stories on elections in India, treatment of Muslims in Europe, or the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
The Taliban, Afghanistan's ruling clique of Muslim clerics, have become famous for trying to stamp out every trace of Western culture, banning music, the Internet and foreign publications. The average Afghan has no access to television, and universities have been shut down. Still, determined Afghans are able to find news. They get it from a source that represents everything the Taliban hate most: the Voice of America. An astonishing 60 percent of Afghan men say they listen to the U.S. news agency every day. The VOA, along with the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
WASHINGTON - Sanford J. Ungar reached a college presidency by a route that strayed far from the conventional road, the one that begins with a doctorate and leads through department chair, dean and provost. He has been a dean - of the School of Communication at American University - but he has no doctorate. His entire career has been connected with journalism, not academia. Still, when he becomes president of Goucher College in a month, Ungar says he will be returning to familiar ground, going home to a community like the one that nurtured him. He sees in Goucher something of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., of the 1950s and 1960s, the family and clan and community that raised him and sent him off to Harvard, to London and Paris, to South Africa and Kenya, to the Washington Post and National Public Radio.
NEWS
By ED WARNER | March 23, 2006
The enemy media fire hard and fast, said Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld in a recent speech, and we must return the fire just as fast. As an example, he cites the extensive coverage of the prisoners at Abu Ghraib. Why not respond, he asks, by reporting on the mass graves of Saddam Hussein's victims - torture answering torture, as it were. And non-journalists may have to paid to do the job. It is a kind of shock and awe of the media, a crucial part of the war on terror. The Voice of America, to be sure, does not do this, and therein lies the problem.
NEWS
March 16, 1991
VOA's CharterEditor: Your Moscow correspondent, Scott Shane, recently reported that Moscow party chief Yuri Prokofiev ''held up the Voice of America as a model for government control, saying that the U.S.-government broadcaster is subject to censorship and cannot take stands critical of the U.S. government.''For the record, the Voice of America is not subject to censorship. It is subject to a congressionally mandated charter which, by law, requires broadcasts to be ''accurate, objective and comprehensive.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 9, 2000
CHICAGO -- Wojciech Minicz, Zdenek "Zenny" Sadlon and Michael Joyce are local radio reporters with huge and loyal followings, but their voices are unfamiliar to the vast majority of Chicagoans. The three are based here with the Voice of America and have long helped broadcast stories of Chicago's diverse immigrant communities and of American political and cultural life to millions of people in Eastern Europe and Asia where the traditions of state-controlled media run deep. In 1989, Minicz told Poles about the U.S. travels of Lech Walesa, leader of the Polish Solidarity movement, who pleaded for aid for Poland.
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1996
LITTLE AMERICA, Wyo. -- On Super Tuesday, the little radio station reminded folks it's National Split Pea Soup Day and by the way, remember to vote.Well, the people of Little America -- a truck-stopping, steak-and-cheese-eating, fire-cracklin' community in Big Wyoming -- well, the people spoke, just a little but enough. And their unified message to Washington was clear: We're undecided. We didn't like Dole because he scares us, and we didn't like Clinton because he offends us, and we couldn't vote for Perot because, well, just because.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.