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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - During Bernadine Healy's tumultuous final six months as president of the American Red Cross, the nonprofit agency awarded her $1.9 million. As a result, Healy's replacement, former Rear Adm. Marsha Evans, and the agency's board have launched separate reviews of the way the Red Cross compensates its senior employees. Healy wept in public frustration when she was forced out of the top American Red Cross job in the tense and confusing aftermath of the Sept. 11 terror attacks in the fall of 2001.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Date: June 14 Her story: Jannette Merritt, 31, grew up in Owings Mills. She is a technical accounts manager at Livefyre, a social content sharing company, in its New York City office. Her father, Otis Merritt III, a retired warden of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, and stepmother, Clarice Paschall , live in Baltimore. Her mother, Marlene Merritt-Hall, and stepfather, Charles Hall, live in Myrtle Beach, S.C. His story: Michael Phillips, 40, grew up in Queens, N.Y. He is a network engineer for Collective, an online audience targeting company based in New York City.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | February 19, 1992
In developing countries, people who want a telephone may often find the installation too costly or the wait too long. Perhaps a less expensive solution would be "virtual telephone service," a type of automated answering service that aims to provide many of the benefits of phone service without requiring ownership of a telephone.Comverse Technology Inc., a Woodbury, N.Y., manufacturer of voice mail systems, said it had received an order for its computerized answering machine equipment for use in virtual phone service in the northwestern part of Mexico.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
I was amazed by The Sun's story on Sunday about the wrong phone number on the state's health care website ( "Latest glitch on health exchange," Jan. 19). Not that mistakes on websites don't occur - we're all human - but that this one has yet to be fixed, many days after it was reported. I manage the websites of several non-profits and take care of ordinary mistakes like that in 10 minutes. Even in the federal government, where I used to develop web content, typos on web pages were routinely fixed within a day. Is nobody minding the store at the Maryland health exchange?
NEWS
October 29, 2011
I recently attempted to call Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office to encourage her to allow the Occupy Baltimore movement to stay overnight in McKeldin Plaza, as members of the group have been doing for weeks. I made the call after regular office hours because I work during the day, but it shouldn't have been a problem to leave a message, right? Wrong. Apparently, the mayor of this city of more than half a million people doesn't have voice mail. After 20 rings, I hung up. From this experience I must conclude that the mayor is only interested in my opinion between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. That's something to consider on Nov. 7. Gregory Sinder, Baltimore
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
When a rabbi in Northwest Baltimore reported a home break-in, a Baltimore police detective called him back to investigate. But it was Sabbath and by religious custom, he was not allowed to answer the phone. He let it go to voice mail. The next day he called the detective. And called. And called. Then he called his area councilwoman, Rochelle "Rikki" Spector, wondering why the detective didn't have voice mail. Spector soon discovered: No detectives had voice mail in her district.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 13, 1998
BOSTON -- We are at lunch when my friend leans over the table to share his latest encounter with telephone technology.It all began with a voice-mail message, which wasn't in itself so startling. But my friend was at his desk when the phone didn't ring. A colleague, it seems, had learned how to dial directly into voice mail -- avoiding the middleman, or middle ear, entirely.Was my friend, a man who parses moral dilemmas for a living, insulted that this caller didn't want to speak to the real, live and available him?
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times pZB | December 30, 1991
BARBARA Nadler knows what it's like to be tormented by a high-tech telephone answering system.She seethes when she calls a business equipped with a "voice mail" system that prevents her from talking to a real operator and instead bounces her from one set of electronic telephone options ("press one for service, press two for sales . . .") to another.The technology can be frustrating when Nadler is on the job as a radio advertising salesperson, spending much of her workday making cold calls to potential clients.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
With a population that topped 4,000 six months ago, Hampstead has gotten used to crowded schools and congested roads. The big debate lately is over voice mail for Town Hall.For the women who answer most of the calls from citizens who want to harangue the mayor, petition a council member or ask about snow removal, bulk trash pickup times or water bills, an automated phone system would be a blessing.But Town Manager Neil M. Ridgely isn't so sure it's time for Hampstead to take on the high-tech trappings of its bigger neighbors.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | May 13, 1991
Voice mail for the deaf sounds like a contradiction, but Leonard A. Blackshear knows better.The president of an Annapolis voice-processing company makes it his business to see that deaf or hearing-impaired clients get the same chances in the workplace as their hearing counterparts.His company, TeleSonic, outfits businesses with a computer-based technology that digitalizes voice sounds so they can be recorded, sent, stored or retrieved. Its applications range from voice mail and telephone audio libraries to automated telephone answering and dialing and access to databases, such as bank account balances, by phone.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
When a rabbi in Northwest Baltimore reported a home break-in, a Baltimore police detective called him back to investigate. But it was Sabbath and by religious custom he was not allowed to answer the phone. He let it go to voice mail. The next day he called the detective. And called. And called. Then he called his city councilwoman, Rochelle "Rikki" Spector, wondering why the detective didn't have voice mail. Spector soon discovered: No detectives had voice mail in her district.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 24, 2013
I have lots of questions about the Black Guerrilla Family case, starting with this: Was the warden of the Baltimore City Detention Center asked to approve maternity leave for any of the female correctional officers allegedly impregnated by inmate Tavon "Bulldog" White? I thought it was a pretty good question. A taxpayer's question. According to the U.S. attorney's office, White got four of his jailers pregnant. (Do you think these women knew what was going on before the indictment came down?
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 28, 2012
I woke Thanksgiving morning to text messages from my sisters. Happy Thanksgiving, they said. My daughter sent a text saying she was jumping in the shower and would be leaving shortly to help me cook. I texted pictures of my dining room table, set with flowers and linens for Thanksgiving dinner. After dinner, I texted pictures of all the dirty dishes. My sister texted a picture of her Christmas tree, and her kids all texted her to say it looked great. I know, because I was copied in on the texting.
NEWS
October 29, 2011
I recently attempted to call Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office to encourage her to allow the Occupy Baltimore movement to stay overnight in McKeldin Plaza, as members of the group have been doing for weeks. I made the call after regular office hours because I work during the day, but it shouldn't have been a problem to leave a message, right? Wrong. Apparently, the mayor of this city of more than half a million people doesn't have voice mail. After 20 rings, I hung up. From this experience I must conclude that the mayor is only interested in my opinion between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. That's something to consider on Nov. 7. Gregory Sinder, Baltimore
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Gus G. Sentementes | June 19, 2011
The body of a Baltimore City Fire Department recruit who was last seen May 29 was found Sunday afternoon in the Liberty Reservoir, police said. The body, which had no obvious signs of trauma, was identified as Rodney Earl Goggins, Jr., 20, said Major Phil Kasten of the Carroll County Sheriff's Office, which is continuing to investigate the death. "This entire ordeal has been especially troubling to the recruits and the members of the department. We all had held out hope and optimism of his return," said city Fire Department spokesman Kevin Cartwright.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | September 21, 2007
For about 500 homeless people each year, Arundel House of Hope in Glen Burnie has provided temporary housing, case management and, until now, one shared phone number. Without telephone numbers to include on job applications, gaining employment can prove difficult. And without a job, finding a permanent home seems impossible. "If they get a call from an employer, the phone is answered, `Arundel House of Hope,'" said director of development Mary Alexander. "That opens up a whole bag of worms."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2001
Anyone who tries calling the less-than-efficient phone system of Baltimore government offices likely experiences one of two nagging problems. Or both. First, you may have to dial three or four numbers - or find yourself transferred three or four times - before reaching the person or department you sought. Next, when you find the right office, you may get someone's voice mail, only to be told the system is full and you can't leave a message. So, despite the proposed budget cuts Mayor Martin O'Malley unveiled last week, city officials have decided it's time for a new way to handle the 10,000-plus phone calls that pour into city offices each day. And in the coming months, the city will install two systems to resolve its phone woes.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | July 7, 2007
For his prison sentence, Joshua Haggerty blames his "big mouth." The 25-year-old Greenport, N.Y., man was sentenced to six months behind bars yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore for an unusual charge - threatening to assault a family member of a law enforcement officer who was working on a drug case involving one of Haggerty's friends. "My big mouth has gotten me in trouble my whole life," Haggerty told Judge William D. Quarles Jr. after apologizing to his parents - but not the federal agent - for his behavior.
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