Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVogue
IN THE NEWS

Vogue

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,Special to The Sun | September 10, 1995
"In and Out of Vogue: A Memoir," by Grace Mirabella with Judith Warner. New York: Doubleday. 257 pages. $25As I read "In and Out of Vogue," the autobiography of editor Grace Mirabella, I was reminded, forcibly, of a soldier of fashion. Ms. Mirabella had the courage and, perhaps, the lack of imagination of an enlistee.Born in Newark, N. J., of a middle-class, Italian-American, "Depression" parentage, Ms. Mirabella was self-made. While many other women of her generation hoped for the support of a husband, Ms. Mirabella relied on herself.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
Perhaps you've had enough of the merits of same-sex marriage , pejorative ethnic terms , and the Christian tendency toward bigotry . Well, today we're back in business with quibbles over usage, in this case to look at why banning certain words can be useful. Twenty years ago, John S. Carroll, then editor of The Baltimore Sun , had pronounced views about the propriety of language in his newspaper. He disliked references to body parts and bodily functions (It took some persuasion for him to allow the features department to run an article on the Butthole Surfers)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 10, 1993
I turn the pages, my hands atremble. It seems to me that the course of civilization is being written here, of all places, in Vogue magazine.Once, when life was simpler, first ladies were role models. Now, Hillary, oh Hillary, is a model model. Annie Liebovitz, who is famous for taking pictures of famous people in various stages of undress, has turned her lens on Hillary, who's suddenly no longer just a policy wonk. She's Cindy Crawford with a law degree.When I tell a friend there's a Hillary photo spread in Vogue -- the one with Sharon Stone on the cover -- the first question he asks, as an American male, is, of course, "Is she naked?"
NEWS
March 4, 2013
The Census Bureau announced last week that it is dropping the use of the term "Negro" to describe black Americans in its population surveys. I suspect few will mourn the word's passing. Today Americans of African descent, especially younger ones, almost universally prefer to be called African-American, people of color or simply black. The bureau reports that the number of blacks who self-identify as Negroes has dwindled to fewer than 50,000, most of them older people living in the South.
NEWS
By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | September 29, 1996
You're at a party. An incredibly striking woman walks into the room, maybe 5 feet 11, less than 120 pounds. You don't know her given name. But, in your mind, you immediately give her one. What is it? If you're like the average woman, maybe 5 feet 4, around 135 pounds, chances are the name you give her rhymes with witch. Yeah, you know the one.As usual, thin is in. But it is also in the line of fire among a conflicted culture of people. We salivate at the thought of a magic diet pill, and at the same time we curse the beauty industry that continually pushes forth waifs as the beauty ideal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and By John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
This newspaper has more icons than a Russian Orthodox church. A recent issue of Publish and Be Damned, The Sun's in-house editing newsletter, listed 21 uses of the irritating vogue word icon within a span of three weeks. Among the icons were Betty Ford, John Waters, Pearl Harbor, William Donald Schaefer, Huey Newton, Muddy Waters and the Domino Sugars sign. Icon once bore a precise sense: an image that suggests a larger meaning, a window into a larger world. Huey Newton is a person, not an icon.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
In "The September Issue," Anna Wintour, the high priestess of high fashion and longtime editor of Vogue magazine, never lets her colleagues see her perspire - and never reveals a spontaneous thought or emotion, or a fascinating one, either. Wintour granted director R.J. Cutler unprecedented access to her editorial processes for this documentary chronicle of her drive to break advertising records with her September 2007 issue. Unfortunately, the teapot tempests Cutler comes away with are neither gripping nor revelatory.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | April 1, 1992
You love the luxe look of Donna Karan's clothes but not the $500 to $2,500 price tags.Does that mean you have to forgo high style clothes? Not at all.If you know your way around a sewing machine you can have that Ralph Lauren jacket or Donna Karan suit -- albeit without the designer's fancy label -- for a fraction of the cost.Consider Lauren's fall '91 line. His red and blue Douglas plaid jacket, with wide notched collar and fit-and-flare princess seaming, would set you back $750 if you bought it in a store.
NEWS
November 16, 1999
Martha Pierce Rafferty, 79, the sister of former first lady Barbara Bush and a former fashion model, died Saturday at her home in Bloomfield, Conn., of natural causes, said her daughter, Sharon Patterson. She modeled for Vogue and other fashion magazines before her marriage to Walter G. Rafferty, a stockbroker who died in 1986.Alberto Bolet, 94, the Havana-born conductor who led orchestras on three continents and help spread Cuban rhythms throughout the world, died Wednesday in Teaneck, N.J.Robert Kramer, 60, an American movie director who devoted his career to capturing dissident movements from Vietnam War protesters to Latin American guerrillas, died Wednesday in Paris from meningitis.
FEATURES
By Encyclopedia of Literature | October 18, 1998
Didion wrote her first novel "Run River" while working fo Vogue magazine as a copywriter and later an editor. As a native Californian, she wrote "Run River" depicting a California family breaking apart.Didion wrote heavily on the political and social changes of the '60s in several works, namely "Slouching Towards Bethlehem," a collection of magazine columns, "The White Album," another collection, and the volume "After Henry," also published as "Sentimental Journeys."Pub Date: 10/18/98
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Over a span of forty-one years, from Fer-de-Lance in 1934 to A Family Affair in 1975, Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe displayed himself as a purist about language as well as a detective of prodigious girth and and gifts. You may recall that in the opening pages of Gambit (1962), he busies himself burning the pages of Webster's Third International because it indicates that people use infer and imply interchangeably. He is a peever. This morning I direct your attention to a short passage from Please Pass the Guilt (1973)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | September 6, 2011
The Tea Party - however you define it - is a favorite punching bag of the left.  But recently the verbal attacks haven't just been about policy, or even personalities. They've been downright craaazy. Democrats have begun calling those in the grass roots conservative effort barbarians, terrorists, racists and, most recently, profanely insulting their moms and threatening to personally send them to hell. I get that there's a bit of hyperbole in these political statements. When Sarah Palin tells followers “don't retreat, reload,” she doesn't actually mean for conservatives to pick up guns and shoot liberals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
A year ago, Hope Tarr found herself marveling at a new beer garden inBrooklyn. Tarr, who co-created an iPhone app that tracks beer gardens in New York City, had grown up in Baltimore listening about these outdoor promised lands where German suds flowed freely and the oompa music never stopped. Her dad used to talk about Blob's Park Bavarian Beer Garden in Jessup reverentially. "The promise was always, when you're old enough, I'll take you to Blob's," she said. Now, in Brooklyn, she'd realized what the fuss was about.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
When Lynn Patterson resolved to lose weight early this year, she took a hormone normally associated with pregnancy, not dieting. The 53-year-old Catonsville nurse went on the hCG diet, named for human chorionic gonadotropin, a hormone that is produced naturally in pregnant women and often used in fertility treatments to trigger ovulation. Promoters of the diet say hCG suppresses the appetite, making it easy to stick to a diet of just 500 calories a day. They also say it helps the body burn fat while retaining muscle.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
In "The September Issue," Anna Wintour, the high priestess of high fashion and longtime editor of Vogue magazine, never lets her colleagues see her perspire - and never reveals a spontaneous thought or emotion, or a fascinating one, either. Wintour granted director R.J. Cutler unprecedented access to her editorial processes for this documentary chronicle of her drive to break advertising records with her September 2007 issue. Unfortunately, the teapot tempests Cutler comes away with are neither gripping nor revelatory.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 30, 2008
I was all set to talk about Jeremy Guthrie and how he might be the biggest steal since the Louisiana Purchase when John McCain's choice for vice president leaked out. ... Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, a gun-toting, former beauty queen officially becomes the first vice presidential candidate I've had a crush on since Walter Mondale. I mean, Dick Cheney is an attractive man, but has he ever been on the cover of Vogue? This is a big coup for the GOP, which has been looking for a VP who can hunt without hurting anyone.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | September 19, 2006
The vogue comparison has been to stack this year's dominating Ravens defense against the team's historic one in 2000. The same connection could be made among this year's offense and the scoring-challenged ones in 2000, 2001, 2002 ... Ravens@Browns Sunday, 4:05 p.m., Ch. 13, 97.9 FM, 1090 AM Line: Ravens by 6
ENTERTAINMENT
By HARTFORD COURANT | October 17, 2004
Couch potatoes may be getting the best upper-body workouts these days, courtesy of some heavy reading of, quite literally, weighty subjects. Take, for instance, last month's Vogue, a letter carrier's nightmare weighing 5 pounds, 4 ounces. Vogue proudly announced that its fall fashion spectacular, weighing in at 832 pages, was its "biggest issue ever." October's 35th anniversary of Interview magazine, its largest issue at 384 pages, weighed less than half of Vogue, but its oversize format made it no less unwieldy than the fashion bible.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | April 27, 2008
Once upon a time, there was a pop goddess named Madonna who ruled the radio airwaves and Billboard charts with her beyond-the-curve music. She often thrilled and sometimes shocked millions with a sound and image that drastically morphed with each album release. But the inevitable happened: Madonna grew older. She became a mother, got married, acquired a British accent and wrote children's books. Meanwhile, younger, edgier pop tarts (Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera and Beyonce) rose triumphant in Madonna's wake.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH | March 24, 2008
And so it turns out that the big $45 million-plus box office for Dr. Seuss' Horton Hears a Who! was not an audience of children after all; it is teenagers and young adults without kids who are driving the ticket sales. Diablo finds love If you saw the Oscars or even the photo aftermath, you know that Academy Award-winning screenwriter Diablo Cody was the one who wowed everybody with her big tattoo, her snazzy leopard dress and her history as a former stripper. Now comes romance. She is said to be the apple of the eye of British director Edgar Wright, whose magnum opus was titled Shaun of the Dead.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.