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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 28, 2007
There was a time in vodka's history that its creators added flavor to cover up its rough spots. Nowadays, flavors are added to smooth vodkas to capture market share, create buzz and add a few dollars to the purchase price. An up-to-date menu of vodkas reads like one found at a juice bar. There are pear, pomegranate, pineapple, green apple, grapefruit, raspberry and lemon offerings. There are vodkas that taste or at least smell like dessert. Finally, there are the marriages made in caffeine: espresso and double-espresso vodkas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Where exactly is the "south side" of the classic Southside cocktail? Bartenders themselves have troubling pinning down its origins. According to beverage lore, the drink could be named after the South Side of Chicago or the Southside Sportsmen's Club on Long Island, N.Y. - no one seems to be sure. Speculation only increases with its ingredients, since it can be made to order with vodka, gin or rum. But Ted Bauer, owner of the Valley Inn in Brooklandville, just north of the Beltway, confidently noted that Baltimore was an early adopter of the recipe, a summer favorite on the country club circuit.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 9, 1994
MOSCOW -- The big, red-brick Kristall Distillery, built above artesian wells in 1901 to produce the best vodka in czarist Russia, survived the Communist Revolution, the Second World War, even Mikhail S. Gorbachev's anti-alcohol campaign of 1986 -- but it may not make it through Russia's rough-and-ready leap back into capitalism.Here, in the land of the world's heaviest drinkers -- who depend on vodka to mark every celebration and disappointment -- the nation's most cherished distillery is producing well below capacity and sliding toward bankruptcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and By Meekah Hopkins | June 17, 2014
"I've been up since 3 in the morning studying true equations," he says. "Now I wish I'd paid more attention in high school. " If Baltimore had a Walter White, it might be Tim Riley, beverage director for Bagby Restaurant Group. Except his sorcery is legal and his mission pure of heart: to provide the citizens of Charm City with a summer go-to cocktail uniquely our own. Add in a few buzzwords like carbonic acid and house-made orange-infused vodka, and really watch us swoon. Actually, Riley only needed to utter four words before I was hooked: Bottled.
NEWS
By Joseph Albright and Joseph Albright,Cox News Service | December 30, 1991
MOSCOW -- As the ruble collapses, Muscovites have hit upon a new form of hard currency: pints of vodka."People keep vodka in stock to use as liquid currency," said Dmitri Shmidrik, 40, a clerk in a scientific laboratory. "I have more than 20 bottles at home, and I don't drink at all."The reason: A repairman will yawn if you offer 20 rubles to get the car fixed or a ceiling plugged. But if you offer a bottle of vodka, the job gets done.Hoarding by little people like Mr. Shmidrik, as well as big-time liquor speculators, has caused what many Russians call a scandalous shortage of their national drink.
FEATURES
By Jeremy Wallace and Jeremy Wallace,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 15, 1994
Maurice Kanbar has a million-dollar idea that he thinks could clear your head and solve the sales problems of an industry: hangover-free vodka.He says people who drink his Skyy Vodka aren't likely to get hangovers because he has removed most of the impurities that he thinks causes them. He used to get bad headaches when he drank, but not since he created Skyy, he says.But now Mr. Kanbar is getting headaches from the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. It has launched an investigation of his hangover claims that could force him to scrap his advertising altogether.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 7, 2007
My version of seafood cooked in a tomato-vodka sauce is quick, easy and festive. Any type of seafood can be used, but crab is particularly good in the sauce. Jumbo lump crab - large pieces of unbroken meat - is best, but backfin crab meat, which includes broken pieces, can be used. Both are usually sold in cans in the refrigerated section of the seafood department. Along with this colorful pasta dish, serve a crisp radicchio-and-romaine salad and your favorite bottled dressing. A crisp chianti would go well with the high-acid tomato sauce.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA and RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 8, 2006
Vodka pasta sauce is hardly a novelty item in 2006, judging from the menus of many Italian restaurants and the fact that we had no trouble finding so many jars of it in supermarkets. But it is hardly a classic sauce, according to the Web site, foodtimeline.org. According to the attributions collected on this amusing and informative food site, vodka sauce showed up at the height of nouvelle cuisine - or, more accurately, nuova cucina in 1980s Italy. Vodka is not as dominant an ingredient as cream and cheese in this rich sauce, and our six tasters had trouble detecting its presence in most of the brands.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | March 18, 1992
Montebello Brands Inc. had bottled plenty of strange and wonderful liquors at its Baltimore plants before, but none seemed stranger or more financially wonderful than "shoju," a kind of watered-down vodka that Koreans were guzzling the way Americans gulp beer.But early this month, the Korean government closed the tap on the Baltimore-bottled shoju when Korean police arrested Montebello's importers for, among other things, selling "sham shoju."Now Montebello finds itself in the middle of an international imbroglio.
NEWS
January 17, 1997
VODKA IS the Russian curse. President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was so appalled by the social costs of drunkenness he launched a hugely unpopular anti-alcohol drive. Some people may have sobered up a bit. But the ultimate loser was the Soviet state. Accustomed to receiving one-third of its overall income from vodka, the government saw its revenues plummet.Under President Boris N. Yeltsin, the state lost control over such revenues altogether after the vodka manufacturers were privatized and rival companies began distilling and importing liquor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and For b | January 21, 2014
I'm done with Winter. Cold snaps, arctic this and freezing that. I need something to remind me of warmer times and only a Margarita will do. Tart, sweet, tequila ... bring me to that place so I don't have to pay attention to the fact that I'm wearing three layers of underwear to keep me from freezing. Blue Agave, it's your time to shine. And shine it does with the decidedly unseasonable Raspberry Margarita. Made with a base of house-made sour mix, which is heavier on the sour than the sweet, this cocktail brings just the right combination of everything required to make a Marg great - with the added bonus of pineapple- and vanilla-bean-infused Espolon Blanco tequila and big chunks of muddled raspberry.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | December 4, 2013
Close your eyes and imagine the Federal Hill bar scene late on a Saturday night. If hazy images of loud, crowded bars filled with pushy, drunken patrons fill your head, then you have likely experienced the madness first-hand. At around 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Joey B's Bar and Grille was quiet, especially in comparison to its rowdier neighbors such as Mad River and Nobles. Besides our trio, there were a handful of other patrons who seemed to stop by only for a quick beer or shot before heading on their way. It would have been easy for the two bartenders behind Joey B's double-sided bar to stare at their phones or find other nonproductive ways to pass the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | June 11, 2013
Ask a native son to write a love letter to Maryland and among her many virtues, Old Bay will surely be extolled. We local folk are fiercely prideful about the quirky bits of living in our state that encompass the saying, "It's just a Maryland thing. " We relish the exclusivity of a select few oddities that make our state great. At the same time, we love introducing outsiders to our traditions and lifestyles. On the short list of items that makes a person feel home here in the Old Line State, Old Bay gives most us the greatest warm and fuzzies.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Baltimore County police are searching for two woman who allegedly stole two bottles of vodka from a Glyndon liquor store last month. Police released images on Wednesday of two woman at The Wine Post on Railroad Avenue where one of them took two bottles of vodka off the shelf and placed them in a bag, according to a police statement. The women took off in a tan or silver Toyota Sienna van and headed toward Owings Mills Boulevard. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 410-307-2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | July 10, 2012
It has come to this, an almost dreaded time of year for we imbibers: having to base our beverage choices around the temperature outside. Is it really "weather appropriate" to drink an Old Fashioned when it's 103 degrees? Shall I enjoy a frothy Guinness next to the pool in a swimsuit? Call me crazy, but I say no. Still, if you don't want to take my word for it, I've got professional backup: Brendan Finnerty and Randal Etheridge, co-owners of Idle Hour in Federal Hill. Their drink - Josh's Last Call - is the answer to your overheated woes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | May 16, 2012
Lady Maryland: a cocktail with a cause, a buzz with a benefit. How could you possibly say no to drinking for charity? That alone sold me. But for those of the more skeptical palate, the refreshing Lady Maryland at Waterfront Kitchen stands alone as an easy warmer-weather sip. Waterfront Kitchen, on the water's edge of Thames Street in Fells Point, is a big believer in sustainability - from using fresh, local ingredients to helping out...
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 2003
This time of year, the abundance of fresh, ripe fruit calls for a little creativity. If you don't need more jam or jelly, you can try your hand at making your own fruit-flavored vodka. Within a few weeks, you can impress your friends with your own homemade cocktail or use it as a beguiling syrup for ice cream or other summer desserts. Fruit with intense flavor works especially well, and a good one to start with is raspberries. You can find plenty of recipes for raspberry vodka. Most of them are relatively simple, and some even call for frozen raspberries, which means you don't even have to wait for summer to make it. But there's something especially appealing about making use of fresh, ripe fruit -- or even slightly overripe fruit.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The marketer of Black Death vodka said yesterday that it has agreed to sell the liquor in the United States under the name Black Hat, satisfying federal regulators who had concluded that the old label was illegal and misleading.The announcement marked a capitulation by Black Death USA, which has imported the beet-based Belgian brew for a couple of years and has pitched it in advertising that featured Slash of the hard-rock group Guns N' Roses. The liquor's packaging was decorated with a smiling skull and coffin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Van Gogh Vodka is introducing what it's calling one of their most innovative and unexpected flavors to date: PB&J. The press release from Van Gogh was spread thick with all kinds of tasty trivia about the beloved sandwich. It says that peanut butter was invented by a doctor in St. Louis for his toothless patients. Van Gogh's PB&J has a primarily peanut fragrance complemented by the aroma of fresh raspberries. But, the profiles reverse on the tongue. Raspberry dominates the flavor, not peanut butter.
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