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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
A downtown Baltimore vocational school has closed, apparently for good, leaving some 160 students waiting for refunds or a chance to finish their education elsewhere.PTC Career Institute, located at the corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets, closed March 1, according to school attorney Joseph S. Kaufman.The closing has angered students who are worried they will have nothing to show for their months of instruction."It was frustrating," said Linora Barnes of Cherry Hill, who started PTC's nursing assistant's program in November.
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SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | October 30, 2005
The Carver football team's reversal of fortune is having a residual effect through all corners of the school, with just about everyone wanting a piece of the team. Talk about a shift in the supply-demand curve: One of the school's economics teachers is showing game films during class. Life is good all over. The Bears, who went 0-10 last season, improved to 8-0 with Friday night's 26-0 win over Southwestern and have a decent shot to claim the school's first state playoff berth. Fourteen starters returned from last year, so the change at Carver has been about internal advancement, not physical improvement.
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1995
A vocational school to help wayward teen-agers is likely to be an early casualty of a County Council looking to trim County Executive John G. Gary's "bare-bones" spending plan.The $700,000 Mr. Gary wants to use to renovate a county-owned building in Crownsville for a school designed to serve 40 trouble-making students may be better used to buy computer laboratories for eight county high schools, Councilman William C. Mulford II, an Annapolis Republican, said yesterday."It's a question of priorities," he said.
NEWS
By Sherry Stravino and Sherry Stravino,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
Daniel J. Muffoletto, a World War II veteran who served in the Army's 10th Mountain Division, recently received his high school diploma under the provisions of a new state law. Muffoletto, 78, and his wife, Dorothy, live in Forest Hill. He attended Baltimore schools through high school at Boys' Vocational School, at Howard and Centre streets. Under a law passed in April, Muffoletto became eligible to receive his high school diploma if he had completed two years of academics and had a year of experience in the auto garage at the Boys' Vocational School.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | January 6, 1994
A downtown Baltimore vocational school that has failed to pay its employees for the past month canceled classes yesterday and sent workers and students home.The closure of the PTC Career Institute, at the corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets, was called temporary. However, the school's parent company, Philadelphia Training Center Corp., appears to be in severe financial trouble and is under investigation by federal officials.The Baltimore school has about 30 employees. Its 160 students pay between $3,600 and $4,800 for five to seven months' training as nursing assistants, security guards and office computer operators.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1996
The former director of a Baltimore vocational school was sentenced to 12 months in federal prison yesterday for his role in a scheme that bilked the U.S. Department of Education out of more than $1 million.Arthur Nelson, 54, who ran Temple School, a private vocational-technical institution, pleaded guilty to wire fraud. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson sentenced him to the one-year prison term, to be followed by four months of home detention.Temple School closed its doors on O'Donnell Street in 1994, a year after financial problems surfaced and Nelson and other ranking administrators were fired.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | January 6, 1994
A downtown Baltimore vocational school that has failed to pay its employees for the past month yesterday canceled classes and sent workers and students home.The closure of the PTC Career Institute, located at the corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets, was called temporary. However, the school's parent company, Philadelphia Training Center Corp., appears to be in severe financial trouble and is under investigation by federal officials.The Baltimore school has about 30 employees. Its 160 students pay between $3,600 and $4,800 for five to seven months training as nursing assistants, security guards and office computer operators.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2003
Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. added to its international holdings yesterday with the announcement that it has bought a university and a vocational school in Chile. Sylvan paid $68.2 million for control of Universidad Nacional Andres Bello and Academia de Idiomas y Estudios Profesionales, a technical and vocational institute, in Chile. "We're very excited to talk about this acquisition today, really not only because it's a superb opportunity for Sylvan, but because it really advances the strategy that we've been talking about for the past several months," Douglas L. Becker, Sylvan's chairman and chief executive officer, said during a conference call.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
The Howard County School of Technology is opening up a used car dealership in the fall to give students some hands-on experience.Fast-talking used car salesmen need not apply."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Staff | July 1, 1999
Harrison Anderson Fuller, an educator and counselor who taught in Baltimore public schools for 28 years, died Friday after surgery at St. Agnes HealthCare. He was 91.The 40-year Northwest Baltimore resident began teaching science in 1949 at the old General Vocational School No. 452, then an all-black vocational school at Biddle and McCulloh streets.The school later merged with the Granville T. Woods Junior and Senior High School."He was an excellent teacher and had a wonderful rapport with the children," said William E. Griggs, who taught mathematics at the school and had been a friend for nearly 50 years.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2003
Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. added to its international holdings yesterday with the announcement that it has bought a university and a vocational school in Chile. Sylvan paid $68.2 million for control of Universidad Nacional Andres Bello and Academia de Idiomas y Estudios Profesionales, a technical and vocational institute, in Chile. "We're very excited to talk about this acquisition today, really not only because it's a superb opportunity for Sylvan, but because it really advances the strategy that we've been talking about for the past several months," Douglas L. Becker, Sylvan's chairman and chief executive officer, said during a conference call.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Staff | July 1, 1999
Harrison Anderson Fuller, an educator and counselor who taught in Baltimore public schools for 28 years, died Friday after surgery at St. Agnes HealthCare. He was 91.The 40-year Northwest Baltimore resident began teaching science in 1949 at the old General Vocational School No. 452, then an all-black vocational school at Biddle and McCulloh streets.The school later merged with the Granville T. Woods Junior and Senior High School."He was an excellent teacher and had a wonderful rapport with the children," said William E. Griggs, who taught mathematics at the school and had been a friend for nearly 50 years.
NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 1998
MAYER, Ariz. -- Never mind the heat, dust and thirst. And it's not so much the saddle sores or aching back from the horse's jackhammer gait. Not the loneliness or isolation.No, the cowboy's greatest bane is the ferocious flora of the desert Southwest. The unassuming manzanita bush with its needlelike thorns that lie in wait for tender flanks. Or the cat claw, a tree that attacks a rider's torso with apparent relish. Ocotillo, which wields its stems like whips. Brittle bush, desert hackberry.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1996
The former director of a Baltimore vocational school was sentenced to 12 months in federal prison yesterday for his role in a scheme that bilked the U.S. Department of Education out of more than $1 million.Arthur Nelson, 54, who ran Temple School, a private vocational-technical institution, pleaded guilty to wire fraud. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson sentenced him to the one-year prison term, to be followed by four months of home detention.Temple School closed its doors on O'Donnell Street in 1994, a year after financial problems surfaced and Nelson and other ranking administrators were fired.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
David Alexander Echols Sr., who helped establish what now is Carver Vocational-Technical High School in West Baltimore, died of cancer Saturday at the Stella Maris Hospice Unit at Mercy Medical Center. He was 95 and lived in Baltimore.Born in Atlanta, he moved to Hampton (Va.) Institute when his mother accepted a job in the residence of the school's president. In 1923, he received a certificate in automotive mechanics from the institute -- now Hampton University -- and went to work in a filling station in New Jersey.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1995
A vocational school to help wayward teen-agers is likely to be an early casualty of a County Council looking to trim County Executive John G. Gary's "bare-bones" spending plan.The $700,000 Mr. Gary wants to use to renovate a county-owned building in Crownsville for a school designed to serve 40 trouble-making students may be better used to buy computer laboratories for eight county high schools, Councilman William C. Mulford II, an Annapolis Republican, said yesterday."It's a question of priorities," he said.
NEWS
By Sherry Stravino and Sherry Stravino,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
Daniel J. Muffoletto, a World War II veteran who served in the Army's 10th Mountain Division, recently received his high school diploma under the provisions of a new state law. Muffoletto, 78, and his wife, Dorothy, live in Forest Hill. He attended Baltimore schools through high school at Boys' Vocational School, at Howard and Centre streets. Under a law passed in April, Muffoletto became eligible to receive his high school diploma if he had completed two years of academics and had a year of experience in the auto garage at the Boys' Vocational School.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
David Alexander Echols Sr., who helped establish what now is Carver Vocational-Technical High School in West Baltimore, died of cancer Saturday at the Stella Maris Hospice Unit at Mercy Medical Center. He was 95 and lived in Baltimore.Born in Atlanta, he moved to Hampton (Va.) Institute when his mother accepted a job in the residence of the school's president. In 1923, he received a certificate in automotive mechanics from the institute -- now Hampton University -- and went to work in a filling station in New Jersey.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Before Michael Landeros, 18, takes his carpentry classes at the Howard County School of Technology, he leaves a bundle in the nearby nursery: his 8-month-old daughter, Rhea Simone."
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
A downtown Baltimore vocational school has closed, apparently for good, leaving some 160 students waiting for refunds or a chance to finish their education elsewhere.PTC Career Institute, located at the corner of Baltimore and Calvert streets, closed March 1, according to school attorney Joseph S. Kaufman.The closing has angered students who are worried they will have nothing to show for their months of instruction."It was frustrating," said Linora Barnes of Cherry Hill, who started PTC's nursing assistant's program in November.
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