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NEWS
April 14, 2014
Nancy Reigle in her letter, "Is vocational education still a possibility for Maryland?" (April 10), is right on time with her remarks about students being forced to feel they must go to college, presumably to "better themselves. " Not every student is college material. Heaven knows we already have far too many lawyers, doctors, computer "experts," etc. to find work. Furthermore, there is absolutely nothing shabby about being a worker who is "gainfully employed" and making an honest living.
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NEWS
April 14, 2014
Nancy Reigle in her letter, "Is vocational education still a possibility for Maryland?" (April 10), is right on time with her remarks about students being forced to feel they must go to college, presumably to "better themselves. " Not every student is college material. Heaven knows we already have far too many lawyers, doctors, computer "experts," etc. to find work. Furthermore, there is absolutely nothing shabby about being a worker who is "gainfully employed" and making an honest living.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014
Over the years Baltimore County has done away with vocational education in all but a few schools ( "The day after graduation," April 7). Students are forced to prepare for college even though most will not go, or they do go on to college and can't make the grade. Many students would benefit from learning to work with their hands and also to enjoy such work. Back in the 1970s and '80s schools had auto shops. You could actually see the joy in students' faces as they worked on cars.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
Over the years Baltimore County has done away with vocational education in all but a few schools ( "The day after graduation," April 7). Students are forced to prepare for college even though most will not go, or they do go on to college and can't make the grade. Many students would benefit from learning to work with their hands and also to enjoy such work. Back in the 1970s and '80s schools had auto shops. You could actually see the joy in students' faces as they worked on cars.
NEWS
By Joan Cadden | August 7, 1991
An open letter to Don E. Riddle Jr., author of the Administration Transition Report:At the request of the Local Advisory Council for Vocational Education, I am writing in response to your AdministrationTransition Report.The LAC would like to know how the information for your report was obtained. What sources did you use and who did you contact?It is our understanding that no one from the Division of Vocational Education system of Anne Arundel County or any member of LAC was approached for any input.
NEWS
By LINDA CHION-KENNEY | April 12, 1992
Half of America's high school graduates don't go to college, and of those who do, most don't graduate. That means we're patronizing a business -- primary and secondary education -- that's ignoring the needs of its main consumer -- the student not bound for college.Put another way: Public school systems are set up largely to prepare kids for higher education, while our shops and factories and communities fill up with kids who can't think on their feet. Think about that the next time you're waiting for your change to be counted out at a fast-food joint.
NEWS
By Fritz McCormick and Fritz McCormick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 1996
The brick, two-story home under construction at 6300 Eastern Star Way, in Columbia's River Hill Village, is starting to come together.Having kept close to schedule throughout the winter, the work crew -- all of them students from the Howard County School of Technology -- hopes to put the finishing touches on the three-bedroom home and its two-car garage by the beginning of June.Their labor on the $325,000 house, including almost all of the design and construction, is the swan song of a vocational education program that over the past 17 years has erected nine homes in Howard County.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
The sea change in what was once called vocational education is visible in Howard County's new Applications and Research Laboratory.Formerly the Howard County School for Technology, the facility in Ellicott City was closed for a year while undergoing the first part of a $4.5 million renovation. Now, it is bursting with shiny, state-of-the-art computers and sophisticated biotechnology equipment."A lot of people see the new place and have the response, 'Wow, I wish all this was here when I was in school,' " said Donald Lewis, the county's instructional facilitator for the technology magnet program.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley made a rare appearance at the state school board meeting Tuesday to welcome the new state school superintendent, Lillian M. Lowery, and encourage the members to work harder on preparing principals and providing vocational training to students. The state board voted unanimously to hire Lowery, who is Delaware's secretary of education. She will begin July 1. Lowery attended the board meeting, sitting next to the interim state school superintendent, Bernard Sadusky, but did not participate in the discussion, which centered on several key issues, including the adjustment to new set of high school exams in the coming years.
NEWS
October 4, 1993
CHRISTINA ZUNA, 16, daughter of James and Debra Zuna of Bear Branch Road in Winfield.School: Senior at South Carroll High School.Honored for: Leadership in local, state and national Vocational and Industrial Clubs of America (VICA).Christina, who studies cosmetology, is vice president for VICA's western region in Maryland and is one of five members in Maryland to win the club's National Statesman Award.Goals: To attend college, major in business, and open her own full-service salon.Comments: "I don't think there's enough of a focus on vocational education in the country.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Benjamin C. Whitten, a prominent Baltimore educator and community activist who served as president of the Baltimore Urban League, died Sept. 21 of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Morgan Park resident was 89. "Ben was a true giant in the Baltimore public school system and could easily have been superintendent. He knew the system inside and out," said Dr. Walter G. Amprey, who was superintendent from 1991 to 1997. "He wore many hats and was a giant in both education and civil rights.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley made a rare appearance at the state school board meeting Tuesday to welcome the new state school superintendent, Lillian M. Lowery, and encourage the members to work harder on preparing principals and providing vocational training to students. The state board voted unanimously to hire Lowery, who is Delaware's secretary of education. She will begin July 1. Lowery attended the board meeting, sitting next to the interim state school superintendent, Bernard Sadusky, but did not participate in the discussion, which centered on several key issues, including the adjustment to new set of high school exams in the coming years.
NEWS
January 11, 2012
I'd love to see Baltimore grow, and if immigrants are the answer that's fine with me, as long as they're here legally ("Immigrants key to reaching mayor's population goal," Jan. 9). Yet no matter how hard the mayor tries to increase population, it will be meaningless unless there are good jobs. It's fine Elsa Garcia's husband found some construction work, but it doesn't sound like full-time employment to me. Why is no one suggesting a greater emphasis on vocational training in our schools?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
When Cindy Vaillancourt owned a paint-your-own-pottery shop in Fulton, she marveled at how some patrons used the quaint surroundings as a community gathering place, and how amid churning out artwork, they shared frustrations with Howard County's school system. The Clarksville resident ultimately sold the pottery shop, but the stories remained with her, and left her determined to gain a spot on the county Board of Education. "It was interesting talking to teenagers and hearing what was going on in the high schools.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | September 3, 2006
With five seats up for grabs and a historic expansion to seven members set to take place by the year's end, it is anyone's guess what the Howard County Board of Education will look like after the general election. Voters will get a better sense of that after the Sept. 12 primary election, when the field of 14 candidates is whittled to 10 who will appear on the November ballot. And if incumbents Joshua Kaufman and Patricia S. Gordon are selected during the primary, they still must survive the November vote.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Erika Hayasaki and Edwin Chen and Erika Hayasaki,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
EL DORADO, Ark. - President Bush proposed new requirements yesterday for vocational training curricula and for science and math education that he said would help Americans acquire needed skills for jobs in the fast-changing economy. "We want every citizen in this country to be able to get the skills necessary to fill the jobs of the 21st century. There are new jobs being created," the president said at the South Arkansas Community College. Bush's appearance was part of a recent drive to highlight his efforts on job-creation - an issue that looms large in his reelection bid. During an hour-long event that the White House billed as a "conversation" on job training and the economy, Bush pronounced the economy to be in solid recovery, citing in part Friday's Labor Department report that 308,000 jobs were created last month.
NEWS
By Information for this column was compiled by Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's Library | December 11, 1994
25 Years Ago (week of Nov. 30-Dec. 6, 1969):* An apprentice training program was set in place by the Howard County Board of Education. The program had been proposed by General Electric officials, the state Department of Vocational Education and the county's vocational department. Tool and die makers for General Electric's new manufacturing facility will be trained at the Howard County Vocational Technical Center.50 Years Ago (Week of Dec. 3-9, 1944):* The Warfield estate in Jessup was sold to W. E. Simpson of One Spot Farm in Elkridge.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
Arthur A. Dick, age 96 of Baypoint Village, Hudson, Florida, died December 30, 2003. Born in Chisholm, Minnesota, he spent most of his working life in Maryland. He received his B.S. degree from the University of Minnesota, his M.A. degree from the University of Maryland and did additional graduate work at Pennsylvania State University and the Johns Hopkins University. Arthur A. Dick was Vocational Education Head for the Baltimore County, Maryland school system and had 39 years of service as an educator in Maryland.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
Arthur A. Dick, age 96 of Baypoint Village, Hudson, Florida, died December 30, 2003. Born in Chisholm, Minnesota, he spent most of his working life in Maryland. He received his B.S. degree from the University of Minnesota, his M.A. degree from the University of Maryland and did additional graduate work at Pennsylvania State University and the Johns Hopkins University. Arthur A. Dick was Vocational Education Head for the Baltimore County, Maryland school system and had 39 years of service as an educator in Maryland.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
A year ago, Howard school Superintendent John R. O'Rourke appointed a committee to assess the county's vocational education programs. An important part of its mission, some board members, PTA officials and parents believed, was to look into relocating the county's technology magnet program so seats could be freed up in crowded high schools. But while the completed report sets general goals for vocational education in the county that mirror already-established state standards, it does not address the issue of crowding.
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