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By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar -- another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment below, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: GNOMIC It means "wise" and "pithy," often with an overtone of obscurity, usually applied to aphorisms or the writer of aphorisms. The word, pronounced NO-mik, has only an etymological relationship with gnomes, garden or otherwise.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  FLORILEGIUM Florilegium  (pronounced flor-uh-LEE-jee-um) is one of those gather-ye-rosebuds words. From the Latin flos , floris , "flower," plus legere , "gather. " It indicates a gathering or collection of brief extracts or writing.  It is thus a fancy word for "anthology," though the emphasis is on short items rather than a bulky compendium.  Example: Garry Wills, who thought Daniel Patrick Moynihan a poseur, says this in an article collected in Lead Time (2004)
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
Each week The Sun’s John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week’s word: GRACILE Wallis Warfield Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor, supposedly said some version of “A woman can’t be too rich or too thin,” a motto for anorexics and bony women everywhere. So the goal is to be wealthy and gracile. Gracile (pronounced GRASS-il)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  DILATORY This is your first word of the week since the end of December, which should explain the choice.  The word (pronounced DIL-uh-toh-ree) means "slow to act. " It is a direct steal from the Latin dilatorius , "delaying," which comes from dilator , "delayer," which in turn derives from the verb differre , "to defer.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar -- another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment below, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: LACHRYMOSE If you are tearful or given to weeping, people may call you lachrymose. One of the most lachrymose figures in literature is Mary Magdalene, who was conventionally represented in the Middle Ages and Renaissance as tearfully mourning the death of Jesus.
FEATURES
March 10, 1991
A few other Persian Gulf war terms that have entered the American vocabulary:Attrite (a-trit): The verb form of attrition, meaning to lose troops under enemy fire.Bovine scatology: Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf's elongated version of the usual translation for B.S.Carpet bombing: A term for massive bombing in a limited space, usually by B-52s. Vietnam-era people date themselves by calling it "rolling thunder."Fog of war: The chaos and confusion of battle both in actuality and in the minds of soldiers trying to translate plans and maps into reality once the shooting starts.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | January 15, 1992
Dennis Posey, 6, thinks he is learning sign language so he can communicate with deaf people. The Lansdowne Elementary School student is only partly right.Although the first grader will be able to communicate with hearing-impaired people, the primary reason he is learning sign language is to improve his reading skills.In a world where interest in the printed word is dwindling among young people and their elders alike, educators are searching out new methods to make reading an enjoyable experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dana Hall and Dana Hall,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 17, 2000
"E" has become the nation's ubiquitous prefix: e-mail, eBay, e-commerce. You can purchase e-stamps, sign up for an eFax or ETrade account and e-file your taxes. But these days, using the letter "e" as part of a name almost pegs a company as anything but edgy. "You wouldn't want to call something 'e' so-and-so if you wanted the company to last more than five years," said Sam Birger, a linguist and president of Nomenon, a brand and identity firm based in Cambridge, Mass. "It is getting tired and hackneyed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 17, 2000
Theater: As this revue makes clear, the choreographer's works takes many turns. The tipped bowler hat, the jutting hip, the turned-in feet, the gloved hands with outstretched fingers. These were part of the vocabulary of Bob Fosse's distinctive choreography. That vocabulary was just one of the contributions to the American musical theater made by the late director/choreographer. His work is celebrated in the Tony Award-winning revue, "Fosse," which opens at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | September 29, 1999
Print is part of our everyday world, but often we become oblivious to it. Young children, however, are alert and curious about the world around them. Very early children are able to identify print in the environment, and they will continue to add these words to their vocabulary if we help them.Reading experts suggest building a child's personal sight vocabulary by labeling objects in your home, even before they learn the alphabet. Start by writing words on cards and placing them on objects around the house.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: SPAVINED Human beings' long association with horses before the advent of the automobile has left numerous traces in the language, such as the dead metaphor free rein  (commonly rendered as free reign  by people ignorant of harness) for "autonomy. " Last week, railing against the irritating frequency of iconic  in journalism, I made use of another, suggesting that legendary  "has gone spavined.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: - See more at: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/language-blog/bal-in-a-word-subfusc-20130219,0,1370566.story#sthash.2Canyfd4.dpuf Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
Each week The Sun’s John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week’s word: GRACILE Wallis Warfield Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor, supposedly said some version of “A woman can’t be too rich or too thin,” a motto for anorexics and bony women everywhere. So the goal is to be wealthy and gracile. Gracile (pronounced GRASS-il)
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar -- another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment below, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: GNOMIC It means "wise" and "pithy," often with an overtone of obscurity, usually applied to aphorisms or the writer of aphorisms. The word, pronounced NO-mik, has only an etymological relationship with gnomes, garden or otherwise.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
I enjoyed yesterday's paper with a "new" word in an article's headline ("Opposing votes limn difference in race," Sept. 7), even though at first I wondered if it was a typo. I'd like to think I have a good vocabulary, but that word prompted me to look it up in the dictionary. I then shared the definition with my husband (who really thinks he has a good vocabulary!) and with my two elementary school-aged kids. I think it's great that The Sun challenged us with vocabulary and provided a good way for me demonstrate a skill to my kids that I talk much about — looking up definitions.
NEWS
By Albert Sehlstedt Jr., David Simon and Lynda Robinson Jonathan Bor and Robert A. Erlandson of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | November 5, 1990
Harry Weinberg, Baltimore's lone billionaire, whose eccentricities were dwarfed only by his fortune, died yesterday at Queen's Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii, after an eight-year battle with bone cancer. He was 82.Mr. Weinberg, who accumulated a fortune in real estate, municipal transit companies and other ventures during the last half-century, was a local example of the familiar American success story -- the son of immigrant parents, he quit school at 12, worked in his father's auto shop, sold newspapers on the side and eventually parlayed a series of remarkably successful business deals into enormous wealth.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
I enjoyed yesterday's paper with a "new" word in an article's headline ("Opposing votes limn difference in race," Sept. 7), even though at first I wondered if it was a typo. I'd like to think I have a good vocabulary, but that word prompted me to look it up in the dictionary. I then shared the definition with my husband (who really thinks he has a good vocabulary!) and with my two elementary school-aged kids. I think it's great that The Sun challenged us with vocabulary and provided a good way for me demonstrate a skill to my kids that I talk much about — looking up definitions.
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