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By Jules Witcover | July 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Is the Voice of America's mission being compromised by the Bush administration's determination to sell its war in Iraq to VOA's audience in the Middle East? That's a gnawing question behind a current revolt among about 450 news employees of the government's prime megaphone to trouble spots abroad. They have petitioned Congress to investigate recent shifts in the VOA operation. So far, the petition appears to have fallen on deaf ears on Capitol Hill, with little evident interest among legislators in a presidential election year to engage in a defense of the protesting VOA staffers.
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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2008
Leonard Reed, a broadcast journalist with the Voice of America in the 1950s and 1960s and later a freelance writer whose work appeared in Harper's magazine, Washington Monthly and the Washington Post, died of colon cancer Friday at his home in Chevy Chase. The Montgomery County resident was 90. Born in Montgomery, Ala., in 1918, Mr. Reed graduated from New York University in 1939. He served on a Navy minesweeper in the North Atlantic during World War II, and later as a commanding officer of a submarine chaser in the Pacific.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Civil liberties groups are concerned about the Justice Department's request to Congress for greatly expanded powers to fight terrorism. While they're at it, they would do well to consider as part of the same fight the State Department's recent attempted muzzling of the Voice of America. At issue was an exclusive VOA interview with Mullah Mohammad Omar, head of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. In it, Omar repeated that the Taliban would not turn over suspected terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and asserted that "America has created the evil that is attacking it."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Voice of America, the government-sponsored news organization that has been on the air since 1942, broadcasts in 44 languages - 45 if you count Special English. Special English was developed nearly 50 years ago as a radio experiment to spread American news and cultural information to people outside the United States who have no knowledge of English or whose knowledge is limited. Using a 1,500-word vocabulary and short, simple phrases without the idioms and cliches of colloquial English, broadcasters speak at about two-thirds the speed of conversational English.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1996
You can dump your old car -- or truck or boat -- with Volunteers of America-Chesapeake (VOA) and help fuel a 100-year-old Baltimore crusade.It funnels the cash from sales of donated junkers -- $141,800 from 1,376 vehicles and 45 boats donated last year -- into work with mentally ill residents, substance abusers, prisoners, the homeless and VOA's highly structured Woodlawn center for pre-school children.Besides selling unwanted heaps to help serve its diverse clientele, there are other oddities about VOA, such as the 19th-century origin of its perhaps unfamiliar name.
NEWS
April 19, 2005
THE RECENT news that Voice of America is transferring much of its overnight news operation from Washington to China says much about the perceived value of the American-funded international broadcasting service to the very government whose interest in spreading democracy it is supposed to serve. How unfortunate that after 63 years of bringing news to remote corners around the world and to countries where the flow of information is tightly controlled or filtered by totalitarian governments and one-party regimes, VOA's operation will be located in a communist country with a history of jamming VOA's broadcasts and of expelling those of its journalists who reported critically on government actions.
NEWS
September 30, 1996
MARYLAND'S ONLY privately run prison is a 95-bed medium security facility located at 1105 East Fayette Street in Baltimore City and operated by Volunteers of America. This is just one of the service areas of the Chesapeake branch of VOA, which celebrates its 100th anniversary Saturday and provides children's, mental health and developmentally disabled services, homeless assistance, substance abuse treatment and affordable housing for more than 7,000 people a year in Maryland and Virginia.
NEWS
By ED WARNER | March 23, 2006
The enemy media fire hard and fast, said Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld in a recent speech, and we must return the fire just as fast. As an example, he cites the extensive coverage of the prisoners at Abu Ghraib. Why not respond, he asks, by reporting on the mass graves of Saddam Hussein's victims - torture answering torture, as it were. And non-journalists may have to paid to do the job. It is a kind of shock and awe of the media, a crucial part of the war on terror. The Voice of America, to be sure, does not do this, and therein lies the problem.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 9, 2000
CHICAGO -- Wojciech Minicz, Zdenek "Zenny" Sadlon and Michael Joyce are local radio reporters with huge and loyal followings, but their voices are unfamiliar to the vast majority of Chicagoans. The three are based here with the Voice of America and have long helped broadcast stories of Chicago's diverse immigrant communities and of American political and cultural life to millions of people in Eastern Europe and Asia where the traditions of state-controlled media run deep. In 1989, Minicz told Poles about the U.S. travels of Lech Walesa, leader of the Polish Solidarity movement, who pleaded for aid for Poland.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
The Taliban, Afghanistan's ruling clique of Muslim clerics, have become famous for trying to stamp out every trace of Western culture, banning music, the Internet and foreign publications. The average Afghan has no access to television, and universities have been shut down. Still, determined Afghans are able to find news. They get it from a source that represents everything the Taliban hate most: the Voice of America. An astonishing 60 percent of Afghan men say they listen to the U.S. news agency every day. The VOA, along with the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
March 29, 2006
No one is meddling with news on VOA Ed Warner's column "Don't let America lose its Voice around the world" (Opinion * Commentary, March 23) is one of a series of pieces written in recent weeks by Voice of America veterans who seem to long for the days when clattering typewriters and shortwave radios were VOA's means of communicating with its declining audience. In those years, VOA's entire audience in the Middle East was estimated at a minuscule 1.6 million. It is little wonder that succeeding administrations and Congress allowed the budget of U.S. international broadcasting to decline a real 40 percent in the 1990s.
NEWS
By ED WARNER | March 23, 2006
The enemy media fire hard and fast, said Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld in a recent speech, and we must return the fire just as fast. As an example, he cites the extensive coverage of the prisoners at Abu Ghraib. Why not respond, he asks, by reporting on the mass graves of Saddam Hussein's victims - torture answering torture, as it were. And non-journalists may have to paid to do the job. It is a kind of shock and awe of the media, a crucial part of the war on terror. The Voice of America, to be sure, does not do this, and therein lies the problem.
NEWS
April 19, 2005
THE RECENT news that Voice of America is transferring much of its overnight news operation from Washington to China says much about the perceived value of the American-funded international broadcasting service to the very government whose interest in spreading democracy it is supposed to serve. How unfortunate that after 63 years of bringing news to remote corners around the world and to countries where the flow of information is tightly controlled or filtered by totalitarian governments and one-party regimes, VOA's operation will be located in a communist country with a history of jamming VOA's broadcasts and of expelling those of its journalists who reported critically on government actions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004
SPRINGFIELD, Va. M-y On a blue-and-orange paneled set in a gleaming new television studio, the U.S. government is hard at work here trying to win the hearts and minds of people throughout the Arab world. From this studio in an office park off Interstate 95, Lebaneseborn Mouafac Harb directs coverage of world events by government- owned and operated Alhurra satellite television, as well as its sister service, Radio Sawa, which has its headquarters several miles north in Washington. On any given day, Harb might oversee stories on elections in India, treatment of Muslims in Europe, or the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Is the Voice of America's mission being compromised by the Bush administration's determination to sell its war in Iraq to VOA's audience in the Middle East? That's a gnawing question behind a current revolt among about 450 news employees of the government's prime megaphone to trouble spots abroad. They have petitioned Congress to investigate recent shifts in the VOA operation. So far, the petition appears to have fallen on deaf ears on Capitol Hill, with little evident interest among legislators in a presidential election year to engage in a defense of the protesting VOA staffers.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
Small amounts of anthrax were found in the Supreme Court's basement mailroom and four other federal buildings in Washington yesterday, and the Environmental Protection Agency proposed fumigating a Senate office building to kill spores of the lethal bacteria. In the 15th confirmed case of illness caused by poisoned mail, New Jersey health authorities reported that a woman who handles mail for a private company there has cutaneous anthrax. Officials suggested that her skin infection may have resulted from cross-contamination, with spores from three anthrax-laced letters handled at a mail-sorting facility near her workplace clinging to mail the woman later touched.
NEWS
By ABRAHAM M. HIRSCH | August 11, 1993
The future of the Voice of America (VOA) and of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) is still undecided. The public interest is to have a single effective, representative and affordable institution that speaks to foreign audiences on behalf of the American people.It appears that high-level horse-trading now has resulted in a plan to divvy up language services broadcasting to target audiences in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, some remaining alive with RFE/RL, others with the VOA.Congress has yet to decide on the proposal, but cutting up the baby is not a viable option.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1999
He's got the judge's qualified permission, but probation authorities apparently are not yet ready to let Bruce C. Bereano return to the practice of lobbying in Annapolis.A secretary in Bereano's office said yesterday she did not expect him to be released for work on Monday.One of Annapolis' most successful lobbyists, Bereano is serving a five-month sentence for mail fraud at the Volunteers of America facility on East Monument Street. Though he had expected to be allowed to lobby, probation officials have tried to block that activity.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - After complaining for weeks that Al-Jazeera had an anti-American bias, the Bush administration has now seized on the satellite news channel as a major platform for getting its anti-terror message out to the Arab and Muslim world. Condoleezza Rice, President Bush's national security adviser, gave an interview yesterday to the widely watched Qatar-based Arabic-language station, pressing anew the administration's case that America's air assaults on Afghanistan are neither anti-Arab nor anti-Muslim.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
The Taliban, Afghanistan's ruling clique of Muslim clerics, have become famous for trying to stamp out every trace of Western culture, banning music, the Internet and foreign publications. The average Afghan has no access to television, and universities have been shut down. Still, determined Afghans are able to find news. They get it from a source that represents everything the Taliban hate most: the Voice of America. An astonishing 60 percent of Afghan men say they listen to the U.S. news agency every day. The VOA, along with the British Broadcasting Corp.
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