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NEWS
June 20, 2001
VLADIVOSTOK, the largest city in the Russian Pacific, has a natural setting that rivals San Francisco's. But seven decades of Soviet rule did nothing to exploit that beauty. And since the collapse of communism, the city has limped from one scandal to another. Little improvement is in sight for Vladivostok-area residents, who have been freezing for several consecutive winters simply because their government failed to pay electricity bills or provide heat. An ally of a discredited governor ousted for mismanagement was elected to head the region Sunday.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 10, 2004
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - It was only his second week on the job, but Mayor Vladimir Nikolaev seemed to have all the polish and poise of Russia's new breed of elected official. The 30-year-old food and timber tycoon smoothly sketched ambitious plans last week for redeveloping this scruffy capital of Russia's Far East, pledged to fight corruption and marveled at how far Russia has advanced in the past decade-and-a-half. "Thank God that we have passed to the democratic path of politics," he said.
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FEATURES
By Julian S. Jones | July 14, 1991
When a University of Maryland delegation reached Vladivostok airport recently, it was met by a band of Gypsies.The delegation's Aeroflot flight had arrived early and the Soviet hosts had not yet turned up. In their place were perhaps 75 Gypsies who had been waiting on the airport's second-floor mezzanine, apparently for several days. They had strung makeshift tents from old sheets and blankets, and some sat on the floor in front of these temporary homes drinking tea and smoking. The Soviet hosts hustled their American colleagues out of the airport in a hurry, explaining later in the taxis that they feared something might be stolen.
NEWS
June 20, 2001
VLADIVOSTOK, the largest city in the Russian Pacific, has a natural setting that rivals San Francisco's. But seven decades of Soviet rule did nothing to exploit that beauty. And since the collapse of communism, the city has limped from one scandal to another. Little improvement is in sight for Vladivostok-area residents, who have been freezing for several consecutive winters simply because their government failed to pay electricity bills or provide heat. An ally of a discredited governor ousted for mismanagement was elected to head the region Sunday.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2001
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - The bakery is called Slavyansky Khleb, and it may be one of the most physically secure businesses in the world. Its entrance doors are steel 5 inches thick and wide enough to admit a van. The walls are reinforced concrete. Inside are water reservoirs, a filter system to purify the air and space enough to accommodate director Sergei Prishchepin, his eight employees and 1,991 others. "This has everything. It has sewage treatment facilities, it has an electrical generator, it has air conditioning," Prishchepin says.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 10, 2004
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - It was only his second week on the job, but Mayor Vladimir Nikolaev seemed to have all the polish and poise of Russia's new breed of elected official. The 30-year-old food and timber tycoon smoothly sketched ambitious plans last week for redeveloping this scruffy capital of Russia's Far East, pledged to fight corruption and marveled at how far Russia has advanced in the past decade-and-a-half. "Thank God that we have passed to the democratic path of politics," he said.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- "Oh, they're going around the world, too, are they?" says Peter Crichton when he hears about the Germans. "I saw their Citroen out in the car park."Round-the-world adventurers were practically tripping over each other the other day in this remote finger of Russia.Peter and Eileen Crichton, a middle-aged British couple, had driven across Eurasia from Saudi Arabia in a Land Rover Discovery.The two Germans had crossed Russia in a 1963 Citroen 2 CV, a car so ugly and undersized that it makes the old Volkswagen Bug look stylish and roomy.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- At the end of a bay filled with the sunken hulks of the once mighty Soviet navy, a former military vessel called the Pallada is moored at a private dockyard, waiting to be cut down to scrap.It might be a long wait.Business at the Svatko Ltd. scrap yard should be booming. The bays around Vladivostok, once a closed naval-base city of 700,000 on the Sea of Japan, are filled with rusting battleships, submarines and troop transports -- at least 101 large- and small-tonnage vessels, many sunken.
NEWS
By Clara Germani | August 24, 1996
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - When the arsenal buried in this military port's hilly, San Francisco-like downtown exploded into a giant fireball four years ago, people for 50 blocks around ran for their lives.But Andrei Ostrovsky, a skinny, hyperactive newspaper reporter, scrambled straight to the inferno to report a story of lax military discipline in which a soldier's cigarette ignited stored torpedoes, mines and rockets, killing two.And when two more military arsenals blew up in subsequent years, Ostrovsky was first on the scene and first with the stories of what had happened: Soldiers playing with a rocket and maintenance personnel burning grass over a berm full of explosives were to blame.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 1994
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- Showing that 20 years of exile had only deepened his thunder, Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn used his first news conference back on Russian soil yesterday to fire bolts former Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Westernizing reformers, Russian right-wing leader Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky and, above all, unrepentant Communist "oppressors and executioners."Like a prophet of old emerging from long seclusion to castigate a fallen world, the 75-year-old writer held forth with passion and eloquence for almost two hours on Russia's need for repentance and reconciliation, on the errors of its post-Communist course, on the sufferings of the Russian nation.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2001
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - The bakery is called Slavyansky Khleb, and it may be one of the most physically secure businesses in the world. Its entrance doors are steel 5 inches thick and wide enough to admit a van. The walls are reinforced concrete. Inside are water reservoirs, a filter system to purify the air and space enough to accommodate director Sergei Prishchepin, his eight employees and 1,991 others. "This has everything. It has sewage treatment facilities, it has an electrical generator, it has air conditioning," Prishchepin says.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- "Oh, they're going around the world, too, are they?" says Peter Crichton when he hears about the Germans. "I saw their Citroen out in the car park."Round-the-world adventurers were practically tripping over each other the other day in this remote finger of Russia.Peter and Eileen Crichton, a middle-aged British couple, had driven across Eurasia from Saudi Arabia in a Land Rover Discovery.The two Germans had crossed Russia in a 1963 Citroen 2 CV, a car so ugly and undersized that it makes the old Volkswagen Bug look stylish and roomy.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- At the end of a bay filled with the sunken hulks of the once mighty Soviet navy, a former military vessel called the Pallada is moored at a private dockyard, waiting to be cut down to scrap.It might be a long wait.Business at the Svatko Ltd. scrap yard should be booming. The bays around Vladivostok, once a closed naval-base city of 700,000 on the Sea of Japan, are filled with rusting battleships, submarines and troop transports -- at least 101 large- and small-tonnage vessels, many sunken.
NEWS
By Clara Germani | August 24, 1996
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - When the arsenal buried in this military port's hilly, San Francisco-like downtown exploded into a giant fireball four years ago, people for 50 blocks around ran for their lives.But Andrei Ostrovsky, a skinny, hyperactive newspaper reporter, scrambled straight to the inferno to report a story of lax military discipline in which a soldier's cigarette ignited stored torpedoes, mines and rockets, killing two.And when two more military arsenals blew up in subsequent years, Ostrovsky was first on the scene and first with the stories of what had happened: Soldiers playing with a rocket and maintenance personnel burning grass over a berm full of explosives were to blame.
BUSINESS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 24, 1994
IRKUTSK, Russia -- On a quiet hillside in this distant Siberian city, the University of Maryland is training capitalist agents to penetrate deep into the heart of the old Communist system.The young new agents are being equipped with the latest Western tricks: American business degrees."It's no secret that this is one of the most prestigious university departments in Siberia," said Alexander Diogenov, dean of the program at Irkutsk State University."It has been attracting the best students from Siberia and the Far East."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 1994
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- Showing that 20 years of exile had only deepened his thunder, Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn used his first news conference back on Russian soil yesterday to fire bolts former Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Westernizing reformers, Russian right-wing leader Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky and, above all, unrepentant Communist "oppressors and executioners."Like a prophet of old emerging from long seclusion to castigate a fallen world, the 75-year-old writer held forth with passion and eloquence for almost two hours on Russia's need for repentance and reconciliation, on the errors of its post-Communist course, on the sufferings of the Russian nation.
BUSINESS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 24, 1994
IRKUTSK, Russia -- On a quiet hillside in this distant Siberian city, the University of Maryland is training capitalist agents to penetrate deep into the heart of the old Communist system.The young new agents are being equipped with the latest Western tricks: American business degrees."It's no secret that this is one of the most prestigious university departments in Siberia," said Alexander Diogenov, dean of the program at Irkutsk State University."It has been attracting the best students from Siberia and the Far East."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 21, 1999
MOSCOW -- A crusading journalist who was sentenced by a military court yesterday to three years in prison but then released said the verdict was a warning against environmental activism and a sign of the continuing power wielded by a KGB successor.Grigory M. Pasko, 37, a navy captain and military journalist, was charged with treason after he exposed the navy's dumping of nuclear waste in the Sea of Japan.He was convicted on a lesser charge -- abuse of his position for personal gain -- when the treason accusation was unproved.
FEATURES
By Julian S. Jones | July 14, 1991
When a University of Maryland delegation reached Vladivostok airport recently, it was met by a band of Gypsies.The delegation's Aeroflot flight had arrived early and the Soviet hosts had not yet turned up. In their place were perhaps 75 Gypsies who had been waiting on the airport's second-floor mezzanine, apparently for several days. They had strung makeshift tents from old sheets and blankets, and some sat on the floor in front of these temporary homes drinking tea and smoking. The Soviet hosts hustled their American colleagues out of the airport in a hurry, explaining later in the taxis that they feared something might be stolen.
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