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Vladimir Putin

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NEWS
August 10, 1999
RUSSIAN President Boris N. Yeltsin is so erratic in his behavior that questions may be raised whether Vladimir Putin is truly his final choice for the next Kremlin leader. Even so, Mr. Putin, 47, has outstanding qualifications to rule unruly, corrupt and disorganized Russia, if it comes to that.His espionage activities in Germany and leadership of the Federal Security Service -- the main successor of the KGB -- have given Mr. Putin a good understanding of the modern world outside Russia.His work as the first deputy to St. Petersburg Mayor Anatoly Sobchak put him in close contact with all of Russia's reformist politicians.
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NEWS
April 8, 2014
We all should give a big, hearty thanks to Chief Justice John Roberts and his crew of conservatives for putting a big "C" back in government corruption. By turning complete control of our government over to our own lovable and eminently trustable oligarchs, Mr. Roberts has virtually annexed the Constitution for the wealthy. He's sort of like Vladimir Putin, sans the charm and good looks. William Smith, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
February 9, 2000
AS credible challengers drop out one by one, Vladimir Putin seems destined for a coronation in Russia's March 26 presidential election. This is tragic. It robs Russia of a badly needed chance to strengthen democracy through vigorous debate and an open exchange of ideas. Instead, Russians will go to the polls to ratify a predestined winner -- just as in Soviet times. In his six weeks as acting president, Mr. Putin has shown himself to be a superior manipulator. He has usettled his political rivals by raiding their staffs.
NEWS
March 30, 2014
Some of you tend to suffer MEGO ("my eyes glaze over") syndrome when the topic turns to foreign affairs. But you should do all you can to resist the temptation. The world remains too dangerous a place for America to divert its attention. Today, two significant foreign policy challenges confront us: one, Radical Islam and its many iterations; and two, a resurgent Russia led by our favorite former KGB agent, Vladimir Putin. I was reminded of the former during a recent trip to Europe.
TOPIC
By Bruce B. G. Clarke | March 26, 2000
THE RECENT announcement of a new Russian strategic doctrine has changed the world's military landscape. But the announcement and the factors that led to it have gone largely ignored in the West. Is this the beginning of a Cold War in reverse? Does Russia intend to contain the United States? What should our strategy be? Apparently, Russia's acting president, Vladimir Putin, reversed his country's vow never to strike first with nuclear weapons because of weaknesses in his nation's strategic early warning systems.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 22, 1999
Russia is the kind of place where Vladimir Putin can be counted a moderate.Cheer up. Art Modell will unload the Ravens in all probability by 2004.The campaign entered its mature phase when the candidates began arguing about the mode of their argument.Somebody forgot to tell that old warrior Philip Berrigan that the war is over.Merry Christmas.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
We all should give a big, hearty thanks to Chief Justice John Roberts and his crew of conservatives for putting a big "C" back in government corruption. By turning complete control of our government over to our own lovable and eminently trustable oligarchs, Mr. Roberts has virtually annexed the Constitution for the wealthy. He's sort of like Vladimir Putin, sans the charm and good looks. William Smith, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
You can't reason with Russian dictator Vladimir Putin. He does not know what reason is. He is like a mad dog. You can kill a mad dog and you can kill Vladimir Putin, but you can't reason with either of them. Vladimir Putin has reacted to a popular uprising in Ukraine with the sheer brute force of an invasion ( "Russia orders surrender," March 3). True to his communist roots as a KGB officer, Mr. Putin has condemned those who overthrew Viktor F. Yanukovych as Nazis or fascists.
NEWS
By David Horsey | January 28, 2014
Vladimir Putin wanted to bring the Olympics to Russia and he wanted them to take place in his favorite Black Searesort town, Sochi, even though it is not a locale that sees much, if any, snow and is situated dangerously close to a region roiling with rebels and terrorists who hate Putin. Snow will not be a problem. Enough white stuff can be manufactured to cover a ski slope, if need be. But keeping terrorists from blowing up the Olympics is a bit more difficult. A new video released by radical Islamist separatists in Russia's Dagestan region promises that attacks are coming.
NEWS
September 3, 2000
THIS SUMMER of calamities can't end soon enough for Russia. First the nuclear submarine catastrophe, then the deadly fire at Moscow's television tower, and now the intervention of President Vladimir Putin to save the Bolshoi theater, symbol of Russian cultural greatness. The Bolshoi has been in critical condition for years. Many of its brightest stars have fled to jobs abroad. At home, its St. Petersburg arch-rival, the Marinsky, has often provided better ballet and opera. Even the landmark's 144-year-old oak pillars are rotting.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 22, 2014
What is it about Western leaders from Neville Chamberlain to George W. Bush who want to find good in men of bad character? Acting as if he were endowed by special insight bestowed upon no one else, President George W. Bush declared in 2001 that he had looked Vladimir Putin in the eye and "was able to get a sense of his soul. " According to the Daily Caller.com, in a 2010 interview with talk radio host Hugh Hewitt, Mr. Bush, who was promoting his book "Decision Points," was asked about his ability to see into the souls of men. The former president explained, "The reason why I said that is because I remembered him talking movingly about his mother and the cross that she gave him that she said she had blessed in Jerusalem.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 21, 2014
The right side of history is bunk.   In domestic politics, people (mostly liberals) tend to say, "You're on the wrong side of history" about social issues that are breaking their way. It's a handy phrase, loosely translated as, "You're going to lose eventually, so why don't you give up now?"   Philosophically, the expression is abhorrent because of its "Marxist twang" (to borrow historian Robert Conquest's phrase). The idea that history moves in a predetermined, inexorable path amounts to a kind of Hallmark-card Hegelianism.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
You can't reason with Russian dictator Vladimir Putin. He does not know what reason is. He is like a mad dog. You can kill a mad dog and you can kill Vladimir Putin, but you can't reason with either of them. Vladimir Putin has reacted to a popular uprising in Ukraine with the sheer brute force of an invasion ( "Russia orders surrender," March 3). True to his communist roots as a KGB officer, Mr. Putin has condemned those who overthrew Viktor F. Yanukovych as Nazis or fascists.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
The seizure of the Crimea region of southern Ukraine by Russian troops over the weekend has created the most serious crisis in Europe since Moscow's 2008 incursion into Georgia, which led to the effective dismemberment and annexation of parts of that former Soviet republic. President Barack Obama was right to warn Russian president Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a price for attempting a similar territorial grab in Ukraine, but in order to make that threat credible he must use all the diplomatic tools at his disposal to convince America's European allies to speak with one voice in condemning Russia's dangerous military adventurism and flagrant violation of international norms while avoiding an escalation of the crisis that could lead to armed conflict.
NEWS
By David Horsey | January 28, 2014
Vladimir Putin wanted to bring the Olympics to Russia and he wanted them to take place in his favorite Black Searesort town, Sochi, even though it is not a locale that sees much, if any, snow and is situated dangerously close to a region roiling with rebels and terrorists who hate Putin. Snow will not be a problem. Enough white stuff can be manufactured to cover a ski slope, if need be. But keeping terrorists from blowing up the Olympics is a bit more difficult. A new video released by radical Islamist separatists in Russia's Dagestan region promises that attacks are coming.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
United Nations inspectors aren't saying who launched the chemical weapons attack that killed 1,400 people in Syria in August, but it would be difficult for anyone - including President Bashar Assad's apologists in Moscow - to maintain the argument that it was anyone but the Assad regime. The report found that Sarin gas was used on a large scale and was delivered by surface-to-surface missiles, some of which were marked with what appear to be Cyrillic characters. That suggests a level of armament and technical ability far beyond what any rebel group in Syria is capable of. Meanwhile, another U.N. panel monitoring human rights violations in Syria said it is investigating 14 incidents of possible chemical weapons use in the country.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | July 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - Can you imagine what the right-wing Wall Street Journal editorial page would have written had Bill Clinton, in his first meeting with President Vladimir Putin of Russia, declared afterward, as President Bush did, that he had looked Mr. Putin in the eye, got a sense of his "soul" and found the former KGB boss a "remarkable leader," an "honest, straightforward man ... who loves his family"? Let's see, the lead editorial in the Journal would have been titled "Soul Brother." There would have been one of those little drawings of Mr. Clinton over the caption "The Manchurian Candidate," and the first line of the editorial would have read: "For a guy who says he never inhaled, we can't help but wonder what exactly President Clinton was smoking when he met Vladimir Putin the other day. ..."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin formally declared yesterday that he intends to become prime minister next year, ensuring his dominance of the Russian government even after his term ends. Putin said at a meeting of his party, United Russia, that he had accepted an offer from his close aide, Dmitri A. Medvedev, to move to the prime minister's office if Medvedev wins the presidency in March, which is likely. "If our people will trust Mr. Medvedev and elect him the new president of the Russian federation, I will be prepared to continue our joint work, in this case in the position of premier of the government," Putin said.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 16, 2013
While the slaughter goes on in the Syrian civil war, a remarkable war of words has broken out over the threatened use of American force there, led by of all people Russian President Vladimir Putin. Moscow's strongman of the post-Cold War era, or at least some assigned wordsmith, wrote an op-ed piece in the New York Times making a clever pitch for taking the dispute to the United Nations, where an anticipated Russian veto had deterred the United States from doing so in the first place.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 14, 2013
I'd love to be an invisible presence in the room the next time Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin sit down for a chat. The high stakes drama of the Cold War is gone, but the Russian president is the American president's nemesis on everything from sarin gas attacks in Syria to gay rights in Russia. To see them spar would be enlightening entertainment. After intelligence specialist Edward Snowden leaked information about U.S. cyberspying earlier this year, he went on the lam and found refuge in Moscow.
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