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NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | September 3, 1995
Joy should greet the arrival in shops in the next few weeks of rTC "The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov," edited by Dmitri Nabokov (Knopf. 655 pages. $35). Edited by the great master's son, this will stand as the definitive collection of Nabokov's short fiction. Its 65 stories were written from the early 1920s through the 1950s. Of those, 13 have never appeared in book form before. To browse through them is to be transported to a heaven of grace and elegance of language and human insight, led by the hand by one of the richest and most morally provocative imaginations in the 20th century.
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NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 6, 2008
Poet and essayist Lia Purpura is about to publish her latest book of poetry, King Baby, which she describes as "a conversation with some knowing kind of force." Due out later this month, the collection has won the Beatrice Hawley Award from Alice James Books. Purpura, a writer-in-residence at Loyola College, says many authors have influenced her writing and her life, but three stand out. "These are three books that shocked me awake, made me want to write better, to live more intensely in a daily way," she says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1999
Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977)A Russian-born novel writer, his best-known work, "Lolita," was published in 1955 in France. It deals with a man, Humbert Humbert, having a relationship with a 12-year-old girl, Lolita, (real name Dolores Haze). The book did not reach the U.S. until three years later, but caused a sensation when it did.Nabokov wrote autobiographically with "Mashenka," "Speak, Memory" and "PNIN." The first two books describe both Nabokov's first serious love and his family estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1999
Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977)A Russian-born novel writer, his best-known work, "Lolita," was published in 1955 in France. It deals with a man, Humbert Humbert, having a relationship with a 12-year-old girl, Lolita, (real name Dolores Haze). The book did not reach the U.S. until three years later, but caused a sensation when it did.Nabokov wrote autobiographically with "Mashenka," "Speak, Memory" and "PNIN." The first two books describe both Nabokov's first serious love and his family estate.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | October 20, 1991
VLADIMIR NABOKOV:THE AMERICAN YEARS.Brian Boyd.Princeton University.783 pages. $35.What an awesome surprise: I realized that I was happy and hopeful when I finished this book, the second volume of Brian Boyd's two-part biography of the Russian-American novelist (the first part was "Vladimir Nabokov: the Russian Years"). I continued to hold the fat, pretty volume in my hands, almost fondling it. What could that mean? Usually -- when one has finished even the most scandalously informative of recent biographies -- one has about as much desire to continue holding it as if it were a pet that has just died.
NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 6, 2008
Poet and essayist Lia Purpura is about to publish her latest book of poetry, King Baby, which she describes as "a conversation with some knowing kind of force." Due out later this month, the collection has won the Beatrice Hawley Award from Alice James Books. Purpura, a writer-in-residence at Loyola College, says many authors have influenced her writing and her life, but three stand out. "These are three books that shocked me awake, made me want to write better, to live more intensely in a daily way," she says.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | March 24, 1991
VLADIMIR NABOKOV:THE EARLY YEARS.Brian Boyd.Princeton University.607 pages. $25. Since Vladimir Nabokov died in 1977, it has become clear that he is one of the great word-shamans of the 20th century. Moreover, despite his ivory-tower reputation, the magic of Nabokov's novels seems both necessary and healing for the last wounded years of this century. With a kind of giddy, even tricky integrity, he shows us how to bring together the aching fragments of our experiments: science and poetry, the isolated self and the possibility of love, and even the cultures of Russia and America.
NEWS
April 11, 1991
Alfred Frechette, 81, Massachusetts health commissioner from 1959 to 1972 and from 1979 to 1983, died Sunday in Framingham, Mass. In 1979, he made Massachusetts the first state to ban urea formaldehyde foam insulation. The Environmental Protection Agency imposed a nationwide banyears later.Vera Nabokov-Slonim, 89, the widow of Russian author Vladimir Nabokov, who rescued the manuscript of his controversial novel "Lolita" from an incinerator, died Sunday in Montreux, Switzerland. Nabokov, who died in 1977 at 78, had apparently been unhappy with "Lolita" and had thrown it into an incinerator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 16, 2002
Esquire's Big Book of Fiction, edited by Adrienne Miller (Context Books, 796 pages, $21.95) A glorious compendium! Here are 54 short stories that the magazine published over the 70 years that have passed since its launch in 1933. Names of near-classic greatness: Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Flannery O'Connor, Vladimir Nabokov. More modernly, Phillip Roth. Don DeLillo, Russell Banks, Antonya Nelson and Thomas McGuane. The last story is "The Wish," by Joanna Scott, published by Esquire in February 2000.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2010
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar -- another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment on his blog, You Don't Say, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: REBARBATIVE Not one of the nice words, rebarbative means unattractive, objectionable, annoying, repellant. It comes to us directly from the French rebarbatif, meaning literally to "face each other, beard to beard.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | September 3, 1995
Joy should greet the arrival in shops in the next few weeks of rTC "The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov," edited by Dmitri Nabokov (Knopf. 655 pages. $35). Edited by the great master's son, this will stand as the definitive collection of Nabokov's short fiction. Its 65 stories were written from the early 1920s through the 1950s. Of those, 13 have never appeared in book form before. To browse through them is to be transported to a heaven of grace and elegance of language and human insight, led by the hand by one of the richest and most morally provocative imaginations in the 20th century.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | October 20, 1991
VLADIMIR NABOKOV:THE AMERICAN YEARS.Brian Boyd.Princeton University.783 pages. $35.What an awesome surprise: I realized that I was happy and hopeful when I finished this book, the second volume of Brian Boyd's two-part biography of the Russian-American novelist (the first part was "Vladimir Nabokov: the Russian Years"). I continued to hold the fat, pretty volume in my hands, almost fondling it. What could that mean? Usually -- when one has finished even the most scandalously informative of recent biographies -- one has about as much desire to continue holding it as if it were a pet that has just died.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | March 24, 1991
VLADIMIR NABOKOV:THE EARLY YEARS.Brian Boyd.Princeton University.607 pages. $25. Since Vladimir Nabokov died in 1977, it has become clear that he is one of the great word-shamans of the 20th century. Moreover, despite his ivory-tower reputation, the magic of Nabokov's novels seems both necessary and healing for the last wounded years of this century. With a kind of giddy, even tricky integrity, he shows us how to bring together the aching fragments of our experiments: science and poetry, the isolated self and the possibility of love, and even the cultures of Russia and America.
NEWS
May 30, 2002
An interview with Jane Parrish, 26-year member of Hopewell Book Club, named after a neighborhood in Columbia where the club is based. What book are members reading this month? Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. One of the members brought a list of the 100 most fascinating literary characters to a meeting, and both Lolita and the older man that was fascinated by her were on the list. Does your group read a certain kind of books? We jump all over. We do fiction, nonfiction, self-help, historical fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2011
The Baltimore Book Festival is coming up this weekend, so we asked our staff about their worn and dog-eared favorites. •••• The King James Bible. Four hundred years later, it's still the most beautiful thing ever written in English. Runner-up: “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare.”  Luke Broadwater, managing editor,  b •••• “One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich,” Alexander Solzhenitsyn. The oppression of reading only one book for the rest of my life would pale in comparison to the physical and psychic travails of being a prisoner in a Soviet gulag.
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