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Vladimir Horowitz

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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 19, 1993
Music Critic There are three kinds of pianists: those who love and admire Vladimir Horowitz, those who envy, hate and even loathe him, and those who regard the pianist with a mix of all these emotions.Part of the reason has to be that audiences adored Horowitz. With the possible exception of Franz Liszt and Ignace Paderewski, Horowitz's was the greatest career in the history of the keyboard.All three men were controversial. But Liszt ended his career as a pianist when he was 36 and died before the advent of records.
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By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | February 29, 2012
My earliest memories of music are of my grandmother singing “Once in Royal David City,” as she drove me the half-hour from our house to her apartment, and of listening to my mother's classical record colllection. The minute I took ballet, my friends and I played her 33-rpm recording of Tchaikovsky's “Swan Lake” and “Nutcracker Suite,” and performed in our dining room, where the table was kept to the side. We marched to clear red plastic 45-rpm recordings of John Philip Sousa and sang endlessly Gilbert and Sullivan's “I'm Called Little Buttercup” from records with pictures printed on them.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 1997
Two evil forces drive the movie "Shine." The first is Peter Helfgott, whose brutal, domineering discipline is responsible for the descent of his sensitive, piano-prodigy son, David, into schizophrenia. The second is the man-eating Rachmaninoff Third Concerto, a piece so dangerously difficult that attempting to learn it before one is mature is to invite a nervous breakdown.These demons are fearfully effective in the movie. But the case in real life appears to be rather different. Most of the members of the Helfgott family deny that Peter was the brute that "Shine" makes him out to be. And the Rach 3 (as the concerto is called in the movie and by almost all musicians)
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 28, 2003
Periodically in music, real giants loom over fields crowded with other great talents. These giants are invariably not without flaws, and not without their detractors, but that doesn't really matter. Somehow, the totality of their being assures them an unshakable stature. Vladimir Horowitz is one of these immortals. Wednesday marks the 100th anniversary of his birth in Russia, an occasion being greeted by a fresh wave of merchandise that will provide yet another reminder of the long shadow cast by this astonishing keyboard artist, who died in 1989 in his New York home.
NEWS
August 23, 1998
Wanda Toscanini Horowitz, 90, conductor Arturo Toscanini's daughter who nurtured and guarded her husband, Vladimir Horowitz, through his legendary but turbulent career as a piano virtuoso, died Friday in her Manhattan home.Juanita Kidd Stout, 79, who became the first black woman elected judge in the nation when she won a seat on the Philadelphia Municipal Court in 1959, died Friday of leukemia. She also became the first black woman to serve on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, and had been a music teacher before pursuing a law career.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 1997
When Emil Gilels played the piano, you didn't listen to the music with just your ears: You absorbed it through every part of your body -- your feet, your arms, even your chest.His sound was gorgeous and filled with delicate nuances. But for listeners who heard him early in his career, what impressed most about the Gilels sound was its power. In the giant pieces of the piano repertory, he made you feel that the walls trembled with the stupendous bursts of sound that no other pianist seemed able to produce so easily.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 28, 2003
Periodically in music, real giants loom over fields crowded with other great talents. These giants are invariably not without flaws, and not without their detractors, but that doesn't really matter. Somehow, the totality of their being assures them an unshakable stature. Vladimir Horowitz is one of these immortals. Wednesday marks the 100th anniversary of his birth in Russia, an occasion being greeted by a fresh wave of merchandise that will provide yet another reminder of the long shadow cast by this astonishing keyboard artist, who died in 1989 in his New York home.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 12, 1997
The movie "Shine" has created a phenomenon that suggests a new low in standards for classical music -- something to which I am no doubt contributing by writing about the film for the second time in two weeks.Lest anyone has forgotten, "Shine" is an art-cinema-house release that tells the real-life story of pianist David Helfgott, the severe mental breakdown he suffered as a consequence of his struggles to free himself of his domineering father and to learn the monumentally difficult Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 (the "Rach 3" in the parlance of the movie and of pianists)
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 10, 1992
Alexander Toradze's account of Rachmaninoff's Third Piano Concerto is both fascinating and perverse, enthralling and infuriating.The performance that the 39-year-old Georgian-born, Russian-trained pianist gave of the piece last night in Meyerhoff Hall with the Baltimore Symphony and guest conductor Zdenek Macal was the slowest that this listener has ever heard.At about 48 minutes, it was a full quarter of an hour longer than the first recorded performances of the composer himself and of Vladimir Horowitz (albeit with a few cuts)
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 22, 1991
When famous musicians die, there's usually a flurry of activity as the record companies try to release their final recordings. This is the case in the continuing efforts of Deutsche Grammophon to showcase the late Leonard Bernstein and Vladimir Horowitz, arguably the most popular conductor-composer and pianist of the second half of the 20th century.When Bernstein died, he left his second Mahler cycle -- there was an earlier one for CBS (now Sony) records -- uncompleted because he was not able to record the Symphony No. 8 (the "Symphony of a Thousand")
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 1, 1998
The Philips label is billing its "Great Pianists of the 20th Century" as the largest undertaking of its kind in the history of recorded music. Indeed, it's hard to think of anything else on the scale of this series, which by next September will include 200 CDs devoted to 72 pianists.This undertaking was years in the planning and involved the cooperation of several major (and not-so-major) labels. The first 10 double-CD volumes (around $22 per volume) were issued a few weeks ago, and the next 10 volumes should be in stores within the next two weeks.
NEWS
August 23, 1998
Wanda Toscanini Horowitz, 90, conductor Arturo Toscanini's daughter who nurtured and guarded her husband, Vladimir Horowitz, through his legendary but turbulent career as a piano virtuoso, died Friday in her Manhattan home.Juanita Kidd Stout, 79, who became the first black woman elected judge in the nation when she won a seat on the Philadelphia Municipal Court in 1959, died Friday of leukemia. She also became the first black woman to serve on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, and had been a music teacher before pursuing a law career.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 1997
When Emil Gilels played the piano, you didn't listen to the music with just your ears: You absorbed it through every part of your body -- your feet, your arms, even your chest.His sound was gorgeous and filled with delicate nuances. But for listeners who heard him early in his career, what impressed most about the Gilels sound was its power. In the giant pieces of the piano repertory, he made you feel that the walls trembled with the stupendous bursts of sound that no other pianist seemed able to produce so easily.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 1997
Two evil forces drive the movie "Shine." The first is Peter Helfgott, whose brutal, domineering discipline is responsible for the descent of his sensitive, piano-prodigy son, David, into schizophrenia. The second is the man-eating Rachmaninoff Third Concerto, a piece so dangerously difficult that attempting to learn it before one is mature is to invite a nervous breakdown.These demons are fearfully effective in the movie. But the case in real life appears to be rather different. Most of the members of the Helfgott family deny that Peter was the brute that "Shine" makes him out to be. And the Rach 3 (as the concerto is called in the movie and by almost all musicians)
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 12, 1997
The movie "Shine" has created a phenomenon that suggests a new low in standards for classical music -- something to which I am no doubt contributing by writing about the film for the second time in two weeks.Lest anyone has forgotten, "Shine" is an art-cinema-house release that tells the real-life story of pianist David Helfgott, the severe mental breakdown he suffered as a consequence of his struggles to free himself of his domineering father and to learn the monumentally difficult Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 (the "Rach 3" in the parlance of the movie and of pianists)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 19, 1993
Music Critic There are three kinds of pianists: those who love and admire Vladimir Horowitz, those who envy, hate and even loathe him, and those who regard the pianist with a mix of all these emotions.Part of the reason has to be that audiences adored Horowitz. With the possible exception of Franz Liszt and Ignace Paderewski, Horowitz's was the greatest career in the history of the keyboard.All three men were controversial. But Liszt ended his career as a pianist when he was 36 and died before the advent of records.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | December 12, 1991
ASK SERGEI Edelmann how he's preparing for his piano recital Sunday afternoon at Temple Har Sinai and he'll tell you he's "working the Bible."The 31-year-old pianist doesn't mean Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers or Deuteronomy, but he's sweating over something that has comparable status for most pianists -- the Chopin Etudes. Edelmann is now recording all 24 of these pieces for RCA Victor Red Seal -- he'll play six of them on Sunday -- and he's the first to admit that the etudes are as transcendentally difficult as they are beautiful.
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By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | February 29, 2012
My earliest memories of music are of my grandmother singing “Once in Royal David City,” as she drove me the half-hour from our house to her apartment, and of listening to my mother's classical record colllection. The minute I took ballet, my friends and I played her 33-rpm recording of Tchaikovsky's “Swan Lake” and “Nutcracker Suite,” and performed in our dining room, where the table was kept to the side. We marched to clear red plastic 45-rpm recordings of John Philip Sousa and sang endlessly Gilbert and Sullivan's “I'm Called Little Buttercup” from records with pictures printed on them.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 8, 1992
The RCA logo of little Nipper listening with surprise to his master's voice on an acoustical horn omits an important detail from the original painting: Nipper is seated on master's coffin.That is, of course, the most important fact about records: Long after he or she is dead, records make it possible for the musician to keep playing. And such is the nature of musical celebrity that record companies scour their vaults and those of broadcast archives for performances by famous departed artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 10, 1992
Alexander Toradze's account of Rachmaninoff's Third Piano Concerto is both fascinating and perverse, enthralling and infuriating.The performance that the 39-year-old Georgian-born, Russian-trained pianist gave of the piece last night in Meyerhoff Hall with the Baltimore Symphony and guest conductor Zdenek Macal was the slowest that this listener has ever heard.At about 48 minutes, it was a full quarter of an hour longer than the first recorded performances of the composer himself and of Vladimir Horowitz (albeit with a few cuts)
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