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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
In the month that he has been on trial for treason, Oleg D. Kalugin has spent weekends at his Ocean City condo with his daughter and 12-year-old grandson, who are visiting from Moscow. He has gone for his usual long-distance ocean swims. Back in Washington, the former KGB major general has lectured as usual on Russian politics and intelligence, tended to his consulting business and tried out the new Fresh Fields near his Silver Spring home. And occasionally, Kalugin, 67, has checked the Web for the latest word on his closed trial in Moscow, where he is represented by a lawyer with whom he has never spoken and where a three- judge panel is expected to hand down his sentence today.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Vladimir Mehul Baptiste imagined conversations with his family, according to his mother, banged on the walls of his home screaming, "What's wrong with me?" and sat in a rainstorm because he said it felt good. The man now accused of ramming a stolen truck into the WMAR television station had been hospitalized at psychiatric facilities in recent years, his mother said in an interview. She expressed concern her son was using marijuana. Baptiste was under outpatient care as recently as Monday - one day before police say he barricaded himself into the Towson offices of Channel 2 news.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 2000
MOSCOW - The owner of the nation's only independent television station was arrested last night and packed off to Moscow's most brutal prison, where he was being held incommunicado, unable to see his lawyer. Vladimir Gusinsky, a banker who owns NTV television and publications that are often critical of the government, was summoned to the general prosecutor's office for questioning about 5 p.m. Two hours later, authorities said he was being held in connection with the theft of $10 million of state property.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 22, 2014
What is it about Western leaders from Neville Chamberlain to George W. Bush who want to find good in men of bad character? Acting as if he were endowed by special insight bestowed upon no one else, President George W. Bush declared in 2001 that he had looked Vladimir Putin in the eye and "was able to get a sense of his soul. " According to the Daily Caller.com, in a 2010 interview with talk radio host Hugh Hewitt, Mr. Bush, who was promoting his book "Decision Points," was asked about his ability to see into the souls of men. The former president explained, "The reason why I said that is because I remembered him talking movingly about his mother and the cross that she gave him that she said she had blessed in Jerusalem.
NEWS
October 27, 2000
THE NEWS OUT OF Russia these days is troubling. President Vladimir Putin wants to bring back the old Soviet national anthem. And the Kremlin is mulling the return of goose-stepping honor guards to Lenin's mausoleum. Russia has been without an official anthem since the 1991 Soviet collapse. A 19th-century patriotic melody, which has no lyrics, has been used as a stand-in. But it has been neither ratified by the Communist-dominated parliament nor embraced by the general public. When Russian athletes did not do as well as their country expected at the Sydney Olympics, newspapers and sports figures were quick to blame the wordless anthem.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 30, 2000
MOSCOW - For many Russians, the climate has turned even chillier than the cold north winds bearing down on the country these days would warrant. The political party associated with Vladimir V. Putin is distributing a book to St. Petersburg first-graders that describes the president in the same tone once reserved for another Vladimir - Vladimir I. Lenin, the founder of the Communist Party and leader of the Bolshevik revolution. Perhaps the unprepossessing little book would not have been enough on its own to send shivers down so many spines, but it arrives at a time of concern about Putin's authoritarian inclinations, given the arrest of a Radio Liberty reporter in Chechnya, the assault on Moscow's only independent television station and a clampdown by the former KGB on the flow of information in a Volga River city.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 4, 2001
MOSCOW - No more revolutions or counter-revolutions for Russia, President Vladimir V. Putin was saying yesterday in his state-of-the-nation address - just steady reform. But as he spoke, a Kremlin affiliate was ousting the management of NTV, the country's only independent television network, thrusting the company - and the country - into a showdown over free speech. NTV's employees holed up in the broadcast center last night, vowing to resist. Police circled the building. Putin, said Mikhail Berger, the editor of the newspaper Segodnya, was really delivering two messages yesterday: a decorative one for public consumption and then the real one, against independent journalism.
NEWS
June 17, 2000
EVERYONE WHO wants to know what kind of leader President Vladimir Putin really is should pay attention to a drama now unfolding in Moscow. One of Russia's post-communist overnight billionaires is in jail with common criminals, charged with fraud. Vladimir Gusinsky's real crime seems to be lese majeste, an offense unknown in the United States that falls somewhere between sedition and brazen disrespect of the ruler. Despite the Kremlin's open and veiled warnings to cease and desist, Mr. Gusinsky's media outlets have continued to satirize the president, attack the government's collusion with organized crime and criticize the disastrous war in Chechnya.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- Dr. Tatyana Suprun apologized while walking along the tree-filled grounds of this city's largest tuberculosis hospital and then inside, as if the shabbiness of the brick buildings and the sagging metal-frame beds inside were her fault. "This is, unfortunately, our reality," said Suprun, the head physician, pointing to a plaster ceiling damaged by water. The crumbling infrastructure is not her most pressing problem. Her institution, Tuberculosis Hospital No. 2, can't afford to stock the costly medications and X-ray and ultrasound machines it needs to replace the material on hand, equipment that she says would be unacceptable for a hospital in the United States.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 16, 2000
MOSCOW - The owner of their station is in jail, and the NTV television reporters and satirists have learned a serious lesson about the dangers of criticizing the Kremlin and the limits on freedom of speech in President Vladimir V. Putin's Russia. Yesterday the satirists - about 25 puppeteers, writers, artists, technicians and a director - assembled in a cavernous film studio, putting that lesson to good use. They were training their cameras, lights and wicked wit on a rubbery puppet in their midst.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 21, 2014
The right side of history is bunk.   In domestic politics, people (mostly liberals) tend to say, "You're on the wrong side of history" about social issues that are breaking their way. It's a handy phrase, loosely translated as, "You're going to lose eventually, so why don't you give up now?"   Philosophically, the expression is abhorrent because of its "Marxist twang" (to borrow historian Robert Conquest's phrase). The idea that history moves in a predetermined, inexorable path amounts to a kind of Hallmark-card Hegelianism.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
United Nations inspectors aren't saying who launched the chemical weapons attack that killed 1,400 people in Syria in August, but it would be difficult for anyone - including President Bashar Assad's apologists in Moscow - to maintain the argument that it was anyone but the Assad regime. The report found that Sarin gas was used on a large scale and was delivered by surface-to-surface missiles, some of which were marked with what appear to be Cyrillic characters. That suggests a level of armament and technical ability far beyond what any rebel group in Syria is capable of. Meanwhile, another U.N. panel monitoring human rights violations in Syria said it is investigating 14 incidents of possible chemical weapons use in the country.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 16, 2013
While the slaughter goes on in the Syrian civil war, a remarkable war of words has broken out over the threatened use of American force there, led by of all people Russian President Vladimir Putin. Moscow's strongman of the post-Cold War era, or at least some assigned wordsmith, wrote an op-ed piece in the New York Times making a clever pitch for taking the dispute to the United Nations, where an anticipated Russian veto had deterred the United States from doing so in the first place.
NEWS
April 1, 2011
In Baltimore tonight it might be difficult to smell the hot dogs through the television screen as the Orioles the take on the Tampa Bay Rays in Florida, but the start of the major league baseball season still gets the blood up, clouding judgment, improving our mood. Cheered by a strong finish to last year's season, Oriole fans hope that the steady hand and steely judgment of skipper Buck Showalter will steer the team away from the rocky shoals of 13 consecutive losing seasons. Armed with new sluggers, like Vladimir Guerrero a veteran with an impressive hitting resume and a fearsome nickname — "Vlad" — and backups like Jake Fox who socked a record 10 home runs in spring training, the lineup should have some pop. Three of the four moving parts of the infield — first basemen base, shortstop and third sacker — have been replaced, and the holdover, second baseman Brian Roberts, is a primo player when his back isn't bothering him, a condition many fans can identify with.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 5, 2011
Brad Bergesen knew he didn't wow anybody on Saturday, but he wasn't going to let a so-so performance in his second Grapefruit League start ruin his weekend. He needed 21 pitches to get through the first inning and gave up three runs after getting the first two outs of the second, but he settled down in the third and the Orioles got him off the hook before settling for a 4-4 tie with the Boston Red Sox before the biggest baseball crowd (8,229) in the history of Ed Smith Stadium. "Obviously, to have two outs and two strikes and give up a three-spot isn't what you want to do," he said.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2007
MOSCOW -- The soft-spoken bureaucrat just presented to the world as Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's hand-picked successor appeared on state television yesterday with a deferential plea: The country must remain under Putin's leadership. Dmitry Medvedev, the Kremlin-backed candidate expected to ascend to the presidency in March elections, called on Putin to head the next government as prime minister. Only Putin, he said, will be able to ensure national stability. "It is not enough to elect a new president who shares [Putin's]
NEWS
March 28, 2000
RUSSIA'S new President Vladimir Putin may be the most exciting world leader today. He is young; he is dynamic. As a former spy and accomplished judo wrestler, he is mysterious. And he controls the world's second biggest nuclear arsenal in a country that dominates much of the Euro-Asian land mass. As the three-month interregnum ends and the 47-year-old Mr. Putin becomes Russia's undisputed ruler, he will be a frequent traveler to foreign capitals and host to visiting dignitaries in Moscow.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 28, 2000
MOSCOW -- After boasting on election night that he had gotten through the campaign without making any promises, President-elect Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday that the government needs to improve Russia's standard of living -- but then quickly caught himself. Don't expect miracles, he told his countrymen, and don't expect anything soon. Great flurries of political speculation were wafting across Moscow yesterday, but just as with the snow that has been falling off and on the past few days, nothing has been sticking.
NEWS
November 14, 2006
On Sunday, November 12, 2006, Vladimir Perekalsky, beloved husband of the late Sara Mogilevich, loving father of Boris Perekalsky and Mariya Baraban; loving father-in-law of Bella Perekalsky and Victor Baraban; devoted brother of the late Felix Perekalsky; beloved grandfather of Natasha Perekalsky, Luda and Vadim Hiekin; loving great-grandfather of Stefan and Mia Hiekin.. Services at Sol Levinson & Bros. Inc., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Tuesday, November 14, at 2 P.M. Interment Har Sinai Congregation Cemetery - Garrison Forest Road.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | October 15, 2006
MOSCOW -- An improvised memorial of roses and carnations and daisies in every color sprung up from the concrete outside the building where investigative journalist Anna Politkovskaya was killed by an assassin a week ago, but mourners left other things to remember her by. A few had taped ballpoint pens to the wall, a nod to the profession for which she lived -- and, all but surely, died. There were posters in black and red lettering expressing hopelessness and sorrow, resignation and rage.
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