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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 23, 1998
Leos Janacek was a composer who left a lot to the listener's imagination. All he tells us at the end of his "The Cunning Little Vixen," for example, is that the Forester, the main character, "lets his gun slip from his hands."In his lifetime, the composer steadfastly refused to let his interpreters make more of that conclusion than he thought they should, including suggestions that the Forester has joined the Vixen in death. The composer wanted to leave what happens to the imagination. He concluded "The Cunning Little Vixen" with some of the most powerful music ever composed for an opera's close -- music that suggests the inexorability of nature from generation to generation.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
Before fantasy films made it commonplace to find human and animal characters mingling freely, there was a curious, endearing opera from 1924 by Leos Janacek. Best known in English as The Cunning Little Vixen, it's getting a rare local staging by Peabody Opera Theatre under a more literal translation of the Czech title: The Adventures of Sharp-Ears the Vixen. The plot revolves around the aging Forester, who catches a vixen, Sharp-Ears, and tries to domesticate her. The vixen escapes back into the forest, falls in love with a fox and gets shot by a poultry dealer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
Before fantasy films made it commonplace to find human and animal characters mingling freely, there was a curious, endearing opera from 1924 by Leos Janacek. Best known in English as The Cunning Little Vixen, it's getting a rare local staging by Peabody Opera Theatre under a more literal translation of the Czech title: The Adventures of Sharp-Ears the Vixen. The plot revolves around the aging Forester, who catches a vixen, Sharp-Ears, and tries to domesticate her. The vixen escapes back into the forest, falls in love with a fox and gets shot by a poultry dealer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, Edward Gunts, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod Ollison, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | November 20, 2008
ARTS McDaniel College Chinese landscapes, rodeo bull riding and Superman comic books are among the inspirations for the wide range of art on display in the fourth biennial McDaniel College Faculty Art Show, through Dec. 5 in the Esther Prangley Rice Gallery in Peterson Hall on the McDaniel campus, 2 College Hill in Westminster. Featured artists include Susan Ruddick Bloom, Walter P. Calahan, Emily Grey, Ken Hankins, Trudi Ludwig Johnson, Michael Losch, Katya Dovghan Mychajlyshyn, Steven Pearson, Susan Clare Scott, Richard Stanley and Linda Van Hart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1990
As far as bassist Share Pedersen is concerned, the only real problem with being in an all-female rock band like Vixen is that people ask the dumbest questions.Last year, for instance, when Vixen (who will perform at Hammerjacks Sunday) was touring behind its self-titled debut album, Pedersen and her bandmates were astonished at some of the questions that came their way. "Back then, we were getting the most ridiculous questions," she recounts over the phone from a Lincoln, Neb., hotel. "Like, 'Did Bon Jovi put you together?
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1998
Leos Janacek's "The Cunning Little Vixen" is often called a children's opera.It's a fairy tale set in a forest in which animals talk and understand the language of humans. The opera, which will be performed by Peabody Opera Theatre Nov. 19-22, is charming, funny and simple enough for a child to follow. A baby vixen is captured by a gamekeeper; she grows up and, after killing the forester's chickens, escapes to the forest, where she meets and marries a handsome fox. Though she eventually dies, she leaves behind a brood of fox cubs, including a cunning little vixen.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 30, 1998
If Tiny Tim and elves and Rudolph -- especially Rudolph -- are a bit too treacly for you, you might want to drop in on AXIS Theatre's production of "The Eight: Reindeer Monologues."Playwright Jeff Goode's series of eight short, satirical monologues by Santa's other reindeer is right out of the supermarket tabloids, whose front pages are projected on a screen at the back of the stage. "Santa's Forbidden Affair," blares one headline; "Vixen's Secret Santa Diaries," proclaims another.One by one, the reindeer testify about what turn out to be potential criminal charges brought by Vixen against none other than St. Nick (or, as Dasher calls him, "Fat Boy")
NEWS
By ASHLIE BAYLOR and ASHLIE BAYLOR,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
AT 5 FEET 10 INCHES WITH A milk-chocolate complexion and naturally curly ringlets of dark and light brown highlights, Mia Herring has the look of a model. And that's what the 25-year-old is banking on as a finalist in the second annual national SoftSheen-Carson Vixen Model Search. This easygoing and confident West Baltimore native will know in September whether she has the look the hair care company and urban, streetwise fashion magazine is looking for. "Modeling is second nature for me. I think it's something I'm supposed to do. I know this is it," Herring says hesitantly yet passionately.
SPORTS
December 16, 2004
Heisman, Shmeisman. Southern California's football players obviously were unimpressed. Trojans quarterback Matt Leinart was voted the best player in the country, but picking up the Heisman didn't mean much when it came to winning team most valuable player. USC's players voted running back Reggie Bush the team MVP. The award was announced at the team banquet Tuesday night, three days after Leinart won the Heisman and Bush finished fifth. Maybe if Leinart had brought the trophy to the banquet ... All the rage From Tuesday night's Late Show with David Letterman, the "Top Ten Signs Your Kid Is on Steroids": 10. His science fair project demonstrates ways to get around urine tests.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 30, 2003
I WALK into Spirit, the Halloween superstore in Timonium, at 10:30 in the morning and it's exactly as I feared: The joint is crawling with adults. Thirty people in the place, and not one kid. Fine, it's a weekday. The little brats are in school. But that doesn't matter, because Halloween doesn't belong to kids anymore. Halloween is strictly for the grown-ups now, and everyone knows it. Oh, the grown-ups let the kids have their little trick-or-treat fun for a couple of hours every year.
NEWS
By ASHLIE BAYLOR and ASHLIE BAYLOR,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
AT 5 FEET 10 INCHES WITH A milk-chocolate complexion and naturally curly ringlets of dark and light brown highlights, Mia Herring has the look of a model. And that's what the 25-year-old is banking on as a finalist in the second annual national SoftSheen-Carson Vixen Model Search. This easygoing and confident West Baltimore native will know in September whether she has the look the hair care company and urban, streetwise fashion magazine is looking for. "Modeling is second nature for me. I think it's something I'm supposed to do. I know this is it," Herring says hesitantly yet passionately.
SPORTS
December 16, 2004
Heisman, Shmeisman. Southern California's football players obviously were unimpressed. Trojans quarterback Matt Leinart was voted the best player in the country, but picking up the Heisman didn't mean much when it came to winning team most valuable player. USC's players voted running back Reggie Bush the team MVP. The award was announced at the team banquet Tuesday night, three days after Leinart won the Heisman and Bush finished fifth. Maybe if Leinart had brought the trophy to the banquet ... All the rage From Tuesday night's Late Show with David Letterman, the "Top Ten Signs Your Kid Is on Steroids": 10. His science fair project demonstrates ways to get around urine tests.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 30, 2003
I WALK into Spirit, the Halloween superstore in Timonium, at 10:30 in the morning and it's exactly as I feared: The joint is crawling with adults. Thirty people in the place, and not one kid. Fine, it's a weekday. The little brats are in school. But that doesn't matter, because Halloween doesn't belong to kids anymore. Halloween is strictly for the grown-ups now, and everyone knows it. Oh, the grown-ups let the kids have their little trick-or-treat fun for a couple of hours every year.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 30, 1998
If Tiny Tim and elves and Rudolph -- especially Rudolph -- are a bit too treacly for you, you might want to drop in on AXIS Theatre's production of "The Eight: Reindeer Monologues."Playwright Jeff Goode's series of eight short, satirical monologues by Santa's other reindeer is right out of the supermarket tabloids, whose front pages are projected on a screen at the back of the stage. "Santa's Forbidden Affair," blares one headline; "Vixen's Secret Santa Diaries," proclaims another.One by one, the reindeer testify about what turn out to be potential criminal charges brought by Vixen against none other than St. Nick (or, as Dasher calls him, "Fat Boy")
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 23, 1998
Leos Janacek was a composer who left a lot to the listener's imagination. All he tells us at the end of his "The Cunning Little Vixen," for example, is that the Forester, the main character, "lets his gun slip from his hands."In his lifetime, the composer steadfastly refused to let his interpreters make more of that conclusion than he thought they should, including suggestions that the Forester has joined the Vixen in death. The composer wanted to leave what happens to the imagination. He concluded "The Cunning Little Vixen" with some of the most powerful music ever composed for an opera's close -- music that suggests the inexorability of nature from generation to generation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1998
Leos Janacek's "The Cunning Little Vixen" is often called a children's opera.It's a fairy tale set in a forest in which animals talk and understand the language of humans. The opera, which will be performed by Peabody Opera Theatre Nov. 19-22, is charming, funny and simple enough for a child to follow. A baby vixen is captured by a gamekeeper; she grows up and, after killing the forester's chickens, escapes to the forest, where she meets and marries a handsome fox. Though she eventually dies, she leaves behind a brood of fox cubs, including a cunning little vixen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, Edward Gunts, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod Ollison, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | November 20, 2008
ARTS McDaniel College Chinese landscapes, rodeo bull riding and Superman comic books are among the inspirations for the wide range of art on display in the fourth biennial McDaniel College Faculty Art Show, through Dec. 5 in the Esther Prangley Rice Gallery in Peterson Hall on the McDaniel campus, 2 College Hill in Westminster. Featured artists include Susan Ruddick Bloom, Walter P. Calahan, Emily Grey, Ken Hankins, Trudi Ludwig Johnson, Michael Losch, Katya Dovghan Mychajlyshyn, Steven Pearson, Susan Clare Scott, Richard Stanley and Linda Van Hart.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1998
"The Waterboy" attains the level of most of Adam Sandler's movies, which is to say, not very high. But that will be enough if audiences check their brains at the door to enjoy this amiable, silly and human story of a mama-smothered young man and his rise to fame and acceptance.Sandler plays Bobby Boucher, a social misfit whose one mission is to provide good water to the college football team he works for in the Louisiana bayou. He's a relentless perfectionist, boiling the stuff to guarantee its purity, even offering spring water as an alternative.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1998
"The Waterboy" attains the level of most of Adam Sandler's movies, which is to say, not very high. But that will be enough if audiences check their brains at the door to enjoy this amiable, silly and human story of a mama-smothered young man and his rise to fame and acceptance.Sandler plays Bobby Boucher, a social misfit whose one mission is to provide good water to the college football team he works for in the Louisiana bayou. He's a relentless perfectionist, boiling the stuff to guarantee its purity, even offering spring water as an alternative.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The famous, the near-famous and the never-famous converged on the National Cathedral yesterday to bid adieu to Pamela Harriman, the ambassador to France who built a legend around her political connections and high-powered salons.Part diplomat, part fund-raiser, part aristocrat -- and, some might say, part vixen -- she was remembered yesterday as a patriotic American who had served her country well. In the crowd of 1,157 that gathered for her funeral, the far reach of her charms was boldly in evidence.
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