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By Steve McKerrow | October 22, 1990
On screen, she played "perhaps the greatest women's role ever" and earned two Academy Awards. Off screen, despite a real-life romance of legendary proportions, she struggled much of her life against the emotional illness of manic depression.She was Vivien Leigh, whose role as Scarlett O'Hara in "Gone With the Wind" is merely the most remembered of parts in 20 films and numerous stage plays. And her initially illicit love for and eventual marriage to Lawrence Olivier was romantic theater come to life.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 3, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 11, 1991
An hourlong retrospective on great screen kisses?That's what cable's TNT channel is offering tonight at 8 p.m. and again at 11.If it seems to you that TV has been feeding a lot lately on the carcass of its own past -- with clip-shows, such as NBC's "Sunday Best," specials celebrating 100 or 200 epsiodes of on-going shows, and reunions of shows that are no more -- you are right.But this is another level of video-and-vulture. This is Ted Turner, the owner of TNT, rummaging through his Hollywood film library for scenes involving kisses, getting Lauren Bacall to host and selling it as a "celebration" of love for Valentine's.
NEWS
April 30, 2006
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS FILM COLLECTION / / Warner Home Entertainment / $79.95 No, Tennessee Williams wasn't the author behind every significant movie made between 1950 and 1964. But the Tennessee Williams Film Collection offers a convincing explanation for why one might think that. Few playwrights have enjoyed a string of successes to rival Williams', and throughout the 1950s and into the 1960s, it was rare that a movie adapted from one of his plays wasn't making waves at the box office. His Deep South morality plays, always accompanied by generous helpings of wit, brutality and (usually suppressed)
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By ALICE STEINBACH | November 19, 1990
IT HAPPENED THREE WEEKS AGO,as I was entering the lobby of a posh Washington hotel, one known to be frequented by celebrities visiting the nation's capital."
NEWS
April 30, 2006
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS FILM COLLECTION / / Warner Home Entertainment / $79.95 No, Tennessee Williams wasn't the author behind every significant movie made between 1950 and 1964. But the Tennessee Williams Film Collection offers a convincing explanation for why one might think that. Few playwrights have enjoyed a string of successes to rival Williams', and throughout the 1950s and into the 1960s, it was rare that a movie adapted from one of his plays wasn't making waves at the box office. His Deep South morality plays, always accompanied by generous helpings of wit, brutality and (usually suppressed)
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
This week's issue of Entertainment Weekly reported the search for Francesca, the dark-haired Neapolitan heroine of "The Bridges of Madison County," has narrowed to four actresses.Only one, Isabella Rossellini, is Italian, and none are the right age to play 40-ish Francesca to Clint Eastwood's Robert Kincaid. What will the many fans of the book -- almost in its third year on best-seller lists -- think of such perfidy?Typically, audience members are blandly indifferent to the cinematic transformation of a best seller.
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By Linda Rosenkrantz and Linda Rosenkrantz,Copley News Service | December 26, 1993
These days the auction houses' collectibles catalogs are as star-studded as the latest copy of Entertainment Weekly.Almost every screen luminary of the present and, more particularly, the past, is likely to be represented on their pages by an article of clothing worn in a film, an old Oscar some heir is disposing of, a poster advertising one of their movies or some artifacts they have collected.If you think I'm exaggerating, consider the following partial list and the recent or forthcoming auction activity associated with their names:* Errol Flynn.
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By Phil Kloer and Phil Kloer,Cox News Service | April 15, 1992
They send photos of themselves dressed in antebellum gowns, in bikinis, with husbands and children, in red leather pants, even naked.They're Scarlett wannabes, women from all over the world who want to play Scarlett O'Hara in the upcoming TV miniseries based on Alexandra Ripley's best-selling sequel to "Gone With the Wind."When producer Robert Halmi announced he would search the world for an unknown actress to play the Southern heroine in his eight-hour, $39 million adaptation, scheduled to air in fall 1993, he prompted hundreds of would-be Scarletts to start practicing their drawls and dusting off their hoop skirts.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
There's a bit of a war going on in cable-TV land, and the winners appear to be movie lovers everywhere.American Movie Classics (AMC), which for years dominated the vintage-movies niche on cable television, is being challenged by Turner Classic Movies (TCM). The result is a slew of good movies and programmers who keep a wary eye on what the competition is doing, being sure to match their counterparts blow for blow.March is a perfect example of the competition that has developed. TCM, which has the advantage of access to Ted Turner's nearly bottomless pit of old movies, has for several years staged its "31 Days of Oscar" festival.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
There's a bit of a war going on in cable-TV land, and the winners appear to be movie lovers everywhere.American Movie Classics (AMC), which for years dominated the vintage-movies niche on cable television, is being challenged by Turner Classic Movies (TCM). The result is a slew of good movies and programmers who keep a wary eye on what the competition is doing, being sure to match their counterparts blow for blow.March is a perfect example of the competition that has developed. TCM, which has the advantage of access to Ted Turner's nearly bottomless pit of old movies, has for several years staged its "31 Days of Oscar" festival.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
This week's issue of Entertainment Weekly reported the search for Francesca, the dark-haired Neapolitan heroine of "The Bridges of Madison County," has narrowed to four actresses.Only one, Isabella Rossellini, is Italian, and none are the right age to play 40-ish Francesca to Clint Eastwood's Robert Kincaid. What will the many fans of the book -- almost in its third year on best-seller lists -- think of such perfidy?Typically, audience members are blandly indifferent to the cinematic transformation of a best seller.
NEWS
By George Grella | January 16, 1994
Title: "Hollywood on the Couch: A Candid Look at the Overheated Love Affair Between Psychiatrists and Moviemakers"Author: Stephen Farber and Marc GreenPublisher: MorrowLength, price: 352 pages, $23*Title: "The Phantom Empire"Author: Geoffrey O'BrienPublisher: Norton-! Length, price: 281 pages, $20Hollywood, that city of dreams, whose single great industry is the manufacture of a million fantasies, is the capital of the American state of mind. After 100 years of sitting in the dark watching the hypnotic flickering of light and shadow, we have learned from the movies how to dream in unison -- cinema constructs a whole world of illusion we can enter together, a shared, communal experience.
FEATURES
By Linda Rosenkrantz and Linda Rosenkrantz,Copley News Service | December 26, 1993
These days the auction houses' collectibles catalogs are as star-studded as the latest copy of Entertainment Weekly.Almost every screen luminary of the present and, more particularly, the past, is likely to be represented on their pages by an article of clothing worn in a film, an old Oscar some heir is disposing of, a poster advertising one of their movies or some artifacts they have collected.If you think I'm exaggerating, consider the following partial list and the recent or forthcoming auction activity associated with their names:* Errol Flynn.
FEATURES
By Phil Kloer and Phil Kloer,Cox News Service | April 15, 1992
They send photos of themselves dressed in antebellum gowns, in bikinis, with husbands and children, in red leather pants, even naked.They're Scarlett wannabes, women from all over the world who want to play Scarlett O'Hara in the upcoming TV miniseries based on Alexandra Ripley's best-selling sequel to "Gone With the Wind."When producer Robert Halmi announced he would search the world for an unknown actress to play the Southern heroine in his eight-hour, $39 million adaptation, scheduled to air in fall 1993, he prompted hundreds of would-be Scarletts to start practicing their drawls and dusting off their hoop skirts.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 11, 1991
An hourlong retrospective on great screen kisses?That's what cable's TNT channel is offering tonight at 8 p.m. and again at 11.If it seems to you that TV has been feeding a lot lately on the carcass of its own past -- with clip-shows, such as NBC's "Sunday Best," specials celebrating 100 or 200 epsiodes of on-going shows, and reunions of shows that are no more -- you are right.But this is another level of video-and-vulture. This is Ted Turner, the owner of TNT, rummaging through his Hollywood film library for scenes involving kisses, getting Lauren Bacall to host and selling it as a "celebration" of love for Valentine's.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 3, 2009
"So many people have condemned the play for its sordid theme," Vivien Leigh said in a 1950s interview about Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire," the vehicle for one of her most indelible achievements as an actress. "To me it is an infinitely moving plea for tolerance for all weak, frail creatures, blown about like leaves before the wind of circumstance." That plea seemed more affecting than ever as the Sydney Theatre Company's production of "Streetcar" unfolded Saturday night at the Kennedy Center, with Cate Blanchett inhabiting the central role of Blanche DuBois.
NEWS
By George Grella | January 16, 1994
Title: "Hollywood on the Couch: A Candid Look at the Overheated Love Affair Between Psychiatrists and Moviemakers"Author: Stephen Farber and Marc GreenPublisher: MorrowLength, price: 352 pages, $23*Title: "The Phantom Empire"Author: Geoffrey O'BrienPublisher: Norton-! Length, price: 281 pages, $20Hollywood, that city of dreams, whose single great industry is the manufacture of a million fantasies, is the capital of the American state of mind. After 100 years of sitting in the dark watching the hypnotic flickering of light and shadow, we have learned from the movies how to dream in unison -- cinema constructs a whole world of illusion we can enter together, a shared, communal experience.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | November 19, 1990
IT HAPPENED THREE WEEKS AGO,as I was entering the lobby of a posh Washington hotel, one known to be frequented by celebrities visiting the nation's capital."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 22, 1990
On screen, she played "perhaps the greatest women's role ever" and earned two Academy Awards. Off screen, despite a real-life romance of legendary proportions, she struggled much of her life against the emotional illness of manic depression.She was Vivien Leigh, whose role as Scarlett O'Hara in "Gone With the Wind" is merely the most remembered of parts in 20 films and numerous stage plays. And her initially illicit love for and eventual marriage to Lawrence Olivier was romantic theater come to life.
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