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By Peter M. Krask and Peter M. Krask,Special to The Evening Sun | October 2, 1990
ANTONIO Vivaldi was a good composer but not a particularly good poet. Violinist Daniel Heifitz and poet Daniel Mark Epstein hope to correct that problem tomorrow night when they perform Vivaldi's "Four Seasons" with the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra in the BCO's season-opening concert at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium."
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
It's talky, contrived and a little creaky, but John Logan's "Red," the two-actor play on the boards at Everyman Theatre , is also remarkably absorbing, even uplifting. Who knew art history could be so much fun? Sorry, that sounds flip. And "Red" is anything but flip. The Tony Award-winning work, set in the late 1950s, conjures up an encounter with Mark Rothko, the celebrated abstract expressionist who created the equivalent of epic operas from vast fields of color. On a single canvas, a few painstakingly applied shades interact with and within each other.
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By Peter M. Krask and Peter M. Krask,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
I have always liked Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons" and thought of it as pleasant music with some clever imitations of nature sounds thrown in to make it interesting. Last night, Anne Harrigan and the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, along with violinist Daniel Heifitz, shook the dust of this work and found some real musical substance rattling around in its overly familiar notes. It was a surprising discovery.In fact, the BCO was a surprising discovery. These musicians are worth hearing and their season-opening concert at Goucher College proves it.Harrigan and Heifitz were not the usual conductor and soloist team, thrown together by matching airline schedules rather than artistic purpose.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
The classical music world, ever on the hunt for bright young stars with box office snap, still has some reliably surefire veterans. One of them is Itzhak Perlman, the most popular, widely recognized violinist since Heifetz. Tickets for Perlman's guest stint as soloist and conductor with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra have been scarce for some time, even though, as was the case at his 2010 guest stint with the ensemble, Perlman is doing minimal fiddling. People still want to experience his musicianship, still want to let him know how much he means to them.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 2004
Any program devoted to works by Vivaldi for solo instrument(s) and orchestra invariably calls to mind a stale joke: He didn't write 500 concertos; he wrote one concerto 500 times. But such a program performed with the kind of technical bravado and unwavering musicality displayed last night by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra demolishes that punch line. The big draw for this conductor-less concert is The Four Seasons, a work with an indestructible position high up on the classical hit parade.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 1999
Posterity hasn't always tipped its cap respectfully in the direction of Antonio Vivaldi, the facile composer of the baroque era whose many works won him acclaim at the Austrian imperial court and in his native Italy.The great Igor Stravinsky once dismissed Vivaldi as "a dull fellow who could compose the same form over and so many times over."Our baroque-smitten record-buying public has overruled Stravinsky's curmudgeonly verdict. None of Vivaldi's 700-plus compositions is better loved than his pictorial set of four concertos for solo violin and string orchestra, "The Four Seasons."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 2, 2005
If every performance of 18th-century music generated as much electricity as a concert by the Venice Baroque Orchestra does, folks might easily forget all about Beethoven and Brahms. These virtuosic Venetians let loose on one Vivaldi concerto after another Sunday evening at Shriver Hall, finding in each a wealth of tone coloring, dynamic shading and tempo (from stately to hair-raising supersonic). It's hard to imagine Vivaldi could ever have more winning advocates. The ensemble - founded by Andrea Marcon in 1997 and the only period-instrument orchestra in Venice - proved just as memorable at the start of this nonsubscription presentation by the Shriver Hall Concert Series, providing vivid support for duo-pianists Katia and Marielle Labeque.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1999
Concert events by the Heifetz Institute, Annapolis' own international music festival, reach a crescendo over the next three weekends.Tomorrow night at the Banneker-Douglass Museum, 84 Franklin St. in Annapolis, institute founder Daniel Heifetz, the Classical Band, and associated string players will present "Music of the Spirits," a program of works by Bach, Beethoven, Tartini, Bruch, Wieniawski, Chausson and Vitali.On July 23, also at Banneker-Douglass, soprano Carmen Balthrop joins Heifetz and the Classical Band for a program titled "Love and Passion."
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
The classical music world, ever on the hunt for bright young stars with box office snap, still has some reliably surefire veterans. One of them is Itzhak Perlman, the most popular, widely recognized violinist since Heifetz. Tickets for Perlman's guest stint as soloist and conductor with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra have been scarce for some time, even though, as was the case at his 2010 guest stint with the ensemble, Perlman is doing minimal fiddling. People still want to experience his musicianship, still want to let him know how much he means to them.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2000
Annapolis Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Philip Spletzer swapped one leadership role for another Friday evening when he left his customary perch in the first-violin section for the Maryland Hall podium to conduct a reduced-sized ASO in works by Bach, Vivaldi, Bartok and Joseph Suk. The 33-year-old violinist gave us passionate, viscerally exciting music-making that, while sometimes short on finesse and sheer beauty of tone, was seldom perfunctory or...
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November 29, 2009
The Chang-Cole Duo and Con Brio Trio perform from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday in the ballroom of Historic Oakland Manor, 5430 Vantage Point Road. Admission is free; however, a donation is suggested. Program includes selections from Bach, Vivaldi and Joplin, as well as holiday music. For more information, call 410-730-4744.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2009
SUNDAY Vivaldi Project Concertos by Vivaldi and Bach will be performed in this program by the Vivaldi Project, featuring keyboard artists Andrew Willis and Joseph Gascho and violinist Elizabeth Field, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Baltimore Basilica, 409 Cathedral St. $10-$20. Call 410-385-2638 or go to andiemusiklive.com. Durufle Requiem The exquisite Requiem by Maurice Durufle, who was inspired by Gregorian chant, will be performed by the Central Presbyterian Chancel Choir and Orchestra at 3 p.m. at the church, 7308 York Road, Towson.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 15, 2008
The Grateful Dead, Led Zeppelin, video game theme music and Leon Fleisher -- not exactly your typical Baltimore Symphony Orchestra summer season. On the classical side of the eclectic 2008 lineup, the BSO will celebrate the 80th birthday of Fleisher, one of the country's most gifted and respected musicians, with an all-Mozart program that will showcase both his pianistic and conducting skills. He'll lead the orchestra in Symphony No. 35 and No. 40 and, from the keyboard, Piano Concerto No. 12. Performances are July 24 at the Music Center at Strathmore and July 25 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
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By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | December 8, 2006
The Arundel Vocal Arts Society's Christmas Tidings program on Sunday not only showcased the singers' strengths, but primed the audience's holiday spirits. Musical director David B. Daniel conducted the 37-member chorus in Mozart's "Te Deum" and Vivaldi's "Gloria," along with a selection of Christmas carols and a variety of 19th-century and contemporary seasonal music. Written in 1769 at age 13 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the "Te Deum" was sung simply and purely by the choristers, with little emphasis on harmony, to reveal the pure homophonic text.
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By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2005
If you would like to take a break after a day of raking leaves, Columbia Pro Cantare is offering up a glorious fall program tomorrow night in Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. To begin its 29th season, under the direction of founder and artistic director Frances Motyca Dawson, Columbia Pro Cantare will perform a program featuring two choral masterworks, as well as three pieces that showcase the talents of some special soloists. The programmatic glories begin with two settings of the Gloria movement of the Latin Mass (a hymn of praise taken from the angelic account of the Nativity in Luke 2:14)
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 2005
As if to underscore the recent thaw in Franco-American relations, two ensembles of French musicians visited Baltimore on Sunday afternoon and performed with considerable elan. First up was the Orchestre Chambre de Francais, in a collaboration with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. The society's director, Tom Hall, has conducted this all-string chamber orchestra in New York and Paris in recent years and did so again here. Instrumental works formed the first half of the program, including a nimble, sensitively sculpted account of a string symphony by Mendelssohn.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1998
By the Annapolis Symphony's usual standards, the size of the audience Friday at the first chamber concert in the orchestra's Camerata Series was modest. But there was nothing modest about the enjoyment inspired by this bright, breezy evening of nifty 18th-century fare.The conductor was Elizabeth Schulze, who recently concluded a four-year stint as co-associate conductor of the National Symphony. She led elegantly and passionately in selections by Mozart, Vitali, Vivaldi and Johann Christian Bach.
NEWS
November 29, 2009
The Chang-Cole Duo and Con Brio Trio perform from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday in the ballroom of Historic Oakland Manor, 5430 Vantage Point Road. Admission is free; however, a donation is suggested. Program includes selections from Bach, Vivaldi and Joplin, as well as holiday music. For more information, call 410-730-4744.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 2, 2005
If every performance of 18th-century music generated as much electricity as a concert by the Venice Baroque Orchestra does, folks might easily forget all about Beethoven and Brahms. These virtuosic Venetians let loose on one Vivaldi concerto after another Sunday evening at Shriver Hall, finding in each a wealth of tone coloring, dynamic shading and tempo (from stately to hair-raising supersonic). It's hard to imagine Vivaldi could ever have more winning advocates. The ensemble - founded by Andrea Marcon in 1997 and the only period-instrument orchestra in Venice - proved just as memorable at the start of this nonsubscription presentation by the Shriver Hall Concert Series, providing vivid support for duo-pianists Katia and Marielle Labeque.
NEWS
By Eileen Soskin and Eileen Soskin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2005
Hardly anyone can resist tapping their toes to the music of Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741), one of the most famous and important Italian composers of the Baroque period. His music is infectious, charming and impassioned. At 8 p.m. Saturday, the Candlelight Concert Series presents REBEL (pronounced "re-Bell"), an early-music ensemble in an all-Vivaldi concert of concerti and sonatas. The concert's title ("Antonio Vivaldi: Shades of Red") refers to the composer's nickname, the Red-Headed Priest, and also implies a vividness that will be apparent in the music and the performance.
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