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NEWS
By Michael Hill | December 8, 2013
Many who spent decades in journalism as I did hesitate or hedge when asked to name the most important/interesting/influential/fascinating person they ever met. But I don't. Sorting through the politicians and pundits, the athletes and actors, the common folk and the highfalutin', one name clearly stands out: Nelson Mandela. Today I do not really mourn his death, I celebrate his life. They do not come much better. I was so fortunate to be the South Africa bureau chief for The Sun - reaching Johannesburg on April 27, 1993 - one year to the day before the election that made Mandela president.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill | December 8, 2013
Many who spent decades in journalism as I did hesitate or hedge when asked to name the most important/interesting/influential/fascinating person they ever met. But I don't. Sorting through the politicians and pundits, the athletes and actors, the common folk and the highfalutin', one name clearly stands out: Nelson Mandela. Today I do not really mourn his death, I celebrate his life. They do not come much better. I was so fortunate to be the South Africa bureau chief for The Sun - reaching Johannesburg on April 27, 1993 - one year to the day before the election that made Mandela president.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 18, 1999
Some 150 guests were in a whirl at a tea dance to benefit Viva House. They gathered in the Charles Room at the Belvedere to dance to the tunes of the Helmut Licht band, and to raise about $3,000 for the Southwest Baltimore soup kitchen.Viva House founders Brendan Walsh and Willa Bickham, and their daughter and son-in-law, Kate and Dave Walsh-Little, were honored by supporters including Fred Davis, retired U.S. Weather Service meteorologist; Bonnie Rosenblatt, assistant principal of Park Lower School; John Kenny, partner at White, Miller, Kenny & Vettori; and Carole Weinberg and Buddy Hash, Le Triolet ballroom dance teachers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
In a quiet block in Southwest Baltimore, a warm wind blows plastic bags along a sidewalk. Boarded-up rowhomes line the streets. A pile of mattresses rests on a trash heap in someone's former backyard. A lonely placard reads, "Stop shooting - start living. " The images reflect the lost optimism of a neighborhood that lost more than 40,000 residents between 1980 and 2010. But a few yards down a side alley, there's a place with a different feel. Scores of locals sit chatting in a tree-shaded garden, their conversation mingling with the tinkle of wind chimes.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff writer | November 27, 1992
Viva House, like McDonald's, could hang a sign outside its Mount Street location: Over 250,000 served.But the lay workers at this Catholic Worker House of Hospitality in Southwest Baltimore see little reason to exult over the seemingly never-ending need for the hot meals and bags of food they distribute each month.Three times a week, an average of 200-plus neighborhood residents come to this Union Square institution for an early-evening meal or food to go. By month's end, as welfare checks and food stamps run out, the crowd grows to more than 300. Sunday's special Thanksgiving Dinner drew more than 400 people.
NEWS
June 15, 2006
On June 12, 2006, VIVA L.; beloved wife of the late Albert Curcio; devoted mother of Linda Roark and Shirley Rolfes; dear sister of Wendall and Leroy Haire; loving grandmother of Timmy, Jr. and Bryan Rolfes, Rebecca Seiser and Cory Rolfes. Also survived by nine great-grandchildren. Relatives and friends may gather at Charles S. Zeiler & Son, Inc, 6224 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21224 on Wednesday and Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Our Lady of Fatima Church on Friday, 9:30 A.M. Interment Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Frank P.L. Somerville and Frank P.L. Somerville,Staff Writer | October 9, 1993
Today's celebration of 25 years of Christian charity at Southwest Baltimore's Viva House will not be jubilant.Many hearts have been changed. But what remains to be done is close to overwhelming, Brendan Walsh and Willa Bickham observed sadly yesterday as they and many admirers prepared to mark the soup kitchen's anniversary with a scholarly panel discussion, a dinner and a concert of folk music.Mr. Walsh, a former Catholic seminarian from New York, and Ms. Bickham, a former nun from Chicago, said that poverty, hunger, joblessness, homelessness, family separations, drug dependency, neighborhood hostilities, gun possession, violence, child abuse and despair are all more serious and more prevalent in Baltimore than when they optimistically began their partnership at 26 S. Mount St. a generation ago.And the trends the husband and wife see are not hopeful.
NEWS
By CARL Schoettler and CARL Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1990
VLADIMIR: May one inquire where His Highness spent the night?ESTRAGON: In a ditch.VLADIMIR: (admiringly). A ditch! Where?ESTRAGON: (without gesture). Over there.VLADIMIR: And they didn't beat you?:. ESTRAGON: Beat me? Certainly they beat me.*ESTRAGON: (violently). I'm hungry!VLADIMIR: Do you want a carrot.ESTRAGON: Is that all there is?VLADIMIR: I might have a turnip.ESTRAGON: Give me acarrot. . . .G; -- Excerpts from "Waiting for Godot," by Samuel Beckett. People like Vladimir and Estragon, who are perhaps the two most celebrated tramps in the history of drama, turn up every day at Viva House, where they receive compassion, a sympathetic ear and on this day spinach lasagna, zucchini casserole and Mrs. Smith's apple pie, only a couple of days old.Viva House is the Catholic Worker community that has been dispensing good works on South Monroe street for about 20 years, sheltering the homeless and feeding the hungry, and with about equal fervor, deploring war and oppression.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | July 10, 2006
As each Italian soccer player prepared to boot his penalty kick, the clapping inside Little Italy's Ciao Bella restaurant grew louder - culminating in cheers with each one scored. With every shot that hit the back of the net for the Italians, men and women jumped around the restaurant, hugging friends and strangers alike. And they rejoiced as a player from the French team missed his crucial kick. That stumble proved a key moment after nearly three hours of tension in Ciao Bella yesterday, and it opened the door for Italy to win its first World Cup title in 24 years.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1998
"Fifty-three. Fifty-four. Fifty-five ..."Brendan Walsh's head count at the doorway into the Viva House soup kitchen numbers the poor in this Southwest Baltimore neighborhood.Fifty-three is a guy on crutches Walsh recognizes."Hey, you're getting around pretty good, huh? Beats that wheelchair, doesn't it?"The poor may be with us always, as the Scriptures say, or maybe not, but the line at Viva House certainly seems endless. They come on foot, on crutches, in wheelchairs, old and young, alone and in couples and, more often over these last years, in family groups large and small.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | September 28, 2009
Conspicuous consumption may be down because of the economy, but at the Viva Italia car show in Harbor East Sunday it was far from out. On display were quarter-of-a-million-dollar Lamborghinis, Ferraris, Maseratis and other Italian marquee cars painted in bright yellow and bright red, and in the case of a 1936 Fiat Topolino, flames. The show was the fifth annual event in support of the Children's Guild, a nonprofit group that aids kids with emotional, behavioral and mental challenges. Eighty-two car owners and motorcyclists came from Maryland, Virginia, Washington, New Jersey and Pennsylvania to lend support, said Jeanette Scott, the event registrar and a committee member.
NEWS
April 14, 2009
Bon Secours is key to the area's health At Viva House, we have been proud neighbors of Bon Secours Hospital for 40 years ("Bon Secours seeks a lifeline," April 9). This hospital has always been the rock of the neighborhood. Indeed, at our soup kitchen it is common to hear people say, "You can always go to Bon Secours; they won't turn you away." Over the last four decades, many have fled the neighborhood. The library at Calhoun Street and the one at Payson Street have left. The firehouse on Casey Street is gone.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | March 26, 2009
Spring is a time when we are one nation. In a few weeks, the South will head toward its air-conditioned caves and a cold summer chill will fall on San Francisco, but in spring and fall we are one people, more unum than pluribus, stepping gracefully to the music of photosynthesis, and not even a sour economy can change that, so viva sweet spring. Here in Minnesota, spring doesn't arrive for good until Mother's Day and the opening of walleye season, when men and their mothers go fishing and sit around the campfire afterward and pass the whiskey bottle, and she talks about her years traveling with the tent show before she met their father, all the wonderful men she knew, ducktailed men with big tattoos on their chests who drove fast cars and carried rolls of fifties and weren't afraid to spend, which is a shock, to hear about Mother's wild roving years, but everyone did have them, so get over it. And the urge to rove wildly does strike people at this time of year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SWIFT | December 28, 2008
FILM Best date movie:: 'Slumdog Millionaire: ': This riveting drama about an Indian orphan's unlikely rise on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? is a rare coup. Yes, it's a great flick, but because it's playing at the "arthouse" theater, you get to look smart and cultured without the French subtitles. Now in theaters and look for it to be among this year's Oscar nominees. TV Most improved show:: Season 4 of 'Lost' : Who knew leaving mystery island would give this ailing castaway adventure its groove back?
NEWS
By Brendan Walsh | September 2, 2008
He pointed the gun in my face a few minutes before 5 a.m. . The gun was similar to the ones carried by the police. He was maybe 15 or 16 years old, and he mumbled, "This is for real," or something similar. I had just started my daily two-mile exercise walk around Union Square Park on a recent Tuesday. When you walk at 5 a.m., you escape the heat and the dangerous rays of the sun. When the young man stopped me, I was directly across the street from the front door of Steuart Hill Academic Academy, the school where Mayor Sheila Dixon once taught.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 17, 2008
Viva la Vida Coldplay Sun Grade: B With its meticulously grandiose melodies and botched "poetic" lyrics, Coldplay, fronted by the annoyingly self-obsessed Chris Martin, is an easy band to hate. But here and there, the British rock quintet has managed to produce transcendent music. "Clocks" and "Yellow" immediately come to mind. And despite all the musical pretension, the band has a knack for making its overly stylish arena rock accessible.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
This guy with the elegant barbed-wire bracelet tattooed around his right wrist talks as if he had just wandered into Viva House from an Elmore Leonard novel."
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun reporter | July 22, 2007
Twenty-four years ago, the Baseball Hall of Fame welcomed an Oriole known simply by his first name - a balding infielder who defined his position and bled orange all his life. Next week, Cooperstown, N.Y., will do this again. And like Brooks Robinson before him, Cal Ripken Jr.'s induction is expected to smash attendance records when a throng of Marylanders heads north to cheer his entry into the museum's hallowed halls. Brooks. Cal. Who needs surnames? Their monikers conjure up images of baseball's storied past: Robinson, the deft third baseman, sprawled in the dirt, glove arm raised to show an impossible catch.
NEWS
May 11, 2008
In 1968, Brendan Walsh and his wife, Willa Bickham, founded Viva House, Baltimore Catholic Worker. Over the 40 years it has served primarily as a soup kitchen, food pantry and hospitality house. Also in 1968, he worked to support the Catonsville Nine, a group of nonviolent activists who took 1-A draft records from the Selective Service Office in Catonsville and burned them with homemade napalm to protest the Vietnam War. To commemorate the 40th anniversary of that action, he will join a group traveling to Andrews Air Force Base Saturday to protest the Iraq war. Later that night, Viva House will hold a memorial service for Tom Lewis, one of the Catonsville Nine, who died last month.
TRAVEL
By Mark La Monica and Mark La Monica,Newsday | April 6, 2008
LAS VEGAS -- Fifty years ago, with equal parts charisma and martinis, Frank Sinatra made Las Vegas. In 1996, Vince Vaughn and Jon Favreau introduced that Vegas cool to a new generation with their movie Swingers. Now, it's a losing bet to see a group of friends living it up in Vegas and not saying "Vegas, baby, Vegas!" at least three times an hour. And remember, what happens in Vegas ... gets written about here in the guys' guide to a Las Vegas bachelor party. Some basic principles apply.
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