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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - All the years of fertility drugs, low-tech intra-uterine insemination and higher-tech in vitro fertilization finally gave Pamela Madsen and her husband, Kai, exactly what they wanted: a family with two healthy children, Tyler, now 16, and Spencer, now 12. But their journey into assisted reproduction also produced something they hadn't talked about or even thought about - four surplus embryos. The embryos are still in deep freeze in a fertility center in New York, like an estimated 400,000 others across the nation that have been frozen and stored since the late 1970s.
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Steven Eliopoulos and For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Tamra and Heather discuss Gretchen's shady behavior at the filming of “Hot in Cleveland,” leaving Heather wanting not to invite her or Slade to anything else. Heather forgives but doesn't forget the big argument between her and Terry and is still bothered by Terry's recent conduct. Alexis and Lydia chat over coffee. Alexis states she would have enjoyed seeing Heather film her guest role on the sitcom. Lydia says it is a time where the group of ladies are having good things occur in their lives and thinks that Alexis should be a part of it. Lydia suggests that Alexis needs to make a bold move, by apologizing to the group and trying to move things along with the broken relationships.
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NEWS
December 22, 2001
A Sun Journal article in yesterday's editions that referred to stem cell research might have left the impression that a University of Wisconsin researcher uses material from aborted fetuses. In fact, the stem cells are derived from donated surplus embryos produced by in vitro fertilization.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
When Whitney Watts of Columbia agreed to bear twins on behalf of an infertile Boston couple two years ago, she entered a murky area of Maryland law. Nothing forbade her from signing a contract to carry babies conceived through in vitro fertilization and implanted in her uterus. But neither were there guarantees that Maryland courts would enforce the contract if something went wrong. To this day, such questions are left up to individual judges. Watts' experience had a happy ending, despite serious complications that arose midway through her pregnancy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 24, 1993
A university researcher in Washington has, as an experiment, cloned human embryos, splitting single embryos into identical twins or triplets. This appears to be the first report of such a feat.The scientist, Dr. Jerry L. Hall of George Washington University Medical Center, reported his work at a recent meeting of the American Fertility Society.The experiment was not a technical breakthrough, since he used methods that are commonly used to clone animal embryos, but it opens a range of practical and ethical questions.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | July 1, 1992
The Greater Baltimore Medical Center's 8-year-old in vitro fertilization program hopes to expand by at least 20 percent with the recent hiring of two well-known infertility specialists from Baltimore-area universities.The program is already one of the largest and most successful in the world.The hospital said yesterday that it has hired Dr. Marian Damewood, former director of the in vitro program at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, who becomes associate director of the GBMC program, and Dr. Eugene Katz, past director of in vitro programs at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By John Gearhart | April 4, 2005
OVERWHELMING scientific opinion supports embryonic stem cell research, and many believe it has the potential to revolutionize medicine. The American Medical Association and the National Academy of Sciences have endorsed embryonic stem cell research, and a statewide survey conducted by Gonzales Research & Marketing Strategies in February determined that 78 percent of Marylanders support stem cell research using surplus embryos from in vitro fertilization clinics....
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
The day they implanted the fertilized eggs in her, Vivian McDonnell had never felt so protective. The Bel Air woman, 51, was supposed to remain still for four hours after the in vitro fertilization procedure. But, for a long time after the deadline, she didn't want to move.This was her second chance to go through motherhood. After raising three children in her first marriage, and going through menopause, the Bel Air woman had remarried. And she and her husband, who had no children from his first marriage, badly wanted children of their own.This week, Mrs. McDonnell became one of the oldest American women to give birth.
NEWS
By DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS and DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 25, 2005
In what probably will be reassuring to many couples considering fertility treatments, new research suggests that babies conceived with a little help from science are no more likely to have birth defects or chromosomal abnormalities than babies made the old-fashioned way. But women who become pregnant through in vitro fertilization may experience more complications during their pregnancy, the scientists cautioned. Multiple births are also much more common - and represent the single greatest health risk to babies conceived in that manner.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
WITHOUT EVEN being there, it's possible to hear the impatience in Nancy Reagan's voice. She'd been lobbying quietly in her own discreet way for nearly two years to persuade President Bush to ease restrictions impeding research on embryonic stem cells that could lead to life-saving therapies for diseases such as the Alzheimer's that has forever altered her beloved husband. Finally, the missed opportunity and hope denied became so frustrating she decided to turn up the volume. "I don't see how we can turn our backs on this," the former first lady said at a Beverly Hills fund-raiser last weekend designed to showcase her first public comments on the issue.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 2, 2012
Two women, one a shy British housewife and the other a groundbreaking social scientist, who changed significantly the landscape of family life, died in recent days - and it is worth taking a moment to remember them and their courage. Judith Wallerstein, a psychologist whose research concluded that children bear the scars of their parents' divorce well into adulthood, died at 90 at her daughter's home in Piedmont, Calif. And Lesley Brown, the mother of the world's first "test-tube baby," died of a gall bladder infection at 64, surrounded by the two daughters she bore through in vitro fertilization and her five grandchildren.
NEWS
June 8, 2009
Kennedy's absence could impact healthcare debate Senate Democrats and the White House are stepping up preparations to overhaul the nation's health-care system without the ailing Sen. Edward Kennedy, a politically and emotionally fraught move that could dramatically alter the course of what is expected to be a titanic legislative struggle. While battling a malignant brain tumor, the 77-year-old Massachusetts Democrat, who has devoted much of his 46-year Senate career to advocating for better health care, spent months working on a sweeping bill that Democrats hope will help lay a foundation for the most ambitious health overhaul in generations.
NEWS
By DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS and DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 25, 2005
In what probably will be reassuring to many couples considering fertility treatments, new research suggests that babies conceived with a little help from science are no more likely to have birth defects or chromosomal abnormalities than babies made the old-fashioned way. But women who become pregnant through in vitro fertilization may experience more complications during their pregnancy, the scientists cautioned. Multiple births are also much more common - and represent the single greatest health risk to babies conceived in that manner.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 13, 2005
BOSTON - I don't think I've ever heard quite so much about snowflakes in June. Talk about an odd weather pattern. Could it be the prevailing political winds? The weather report began during a photo op of the president kissing babies. This was not unusual for a politician, but these babies were wearing T-shirts that read "former embryo" and "this embryo was not discarded." They were children dubbed "Snowflakes" by a group that promotes what they call "embryo adoption." The photo op followed the House passage of a bill that would let the government pay for research on stem cell lines derived from leftover embryos stored in fertility clinics.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - All the years of fertility drugs, low-tech intra-uterine insemination and higher-tech in vitro fertilization finally gave Pamela Madsen and her husband, Kai, exactly what they wanted: a family with two healthy children, Tyler, now 16, and Spencer, now 12. But their journey into assisted reproduction also produced something they hadn't talked about or even thought about - four surplus embryos. The embryos are still in deep freeze in a fertility center in New York, like an estimated 400,000 others across the nation that have been frozen and stored since the late 1970s.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 7, 2005
BOSTON - It's no surprise that the debate about cloning research has turned a degree or two from focusing on the moral status of the egg to the moral status of the egg donor. Up to now, we've treated eggs as if they were disembodied commodities. You go to a biology supermarket, pick up a dozen extra large and trundle them off to the research lab. But so far there's only one source for the hundreds of eggs needed for the stem cell research that uses cloned embryos: women. Egg donors are likely to undergo the same treatment as women do for in vitro fertilization.
NEWS
June 21, 1998
EMMITSBURG -- An accidental overdose -- a combination of alcohol and morphine -- caused the death of a Mount St. Mary's College student April 4, according to the coroner in nearby Adams County, Pa.Friends and roommates had told authorities that the victim, 21-year-old Michael L'Heureux of Camp Springs, had ingested morphine and consumed 20 beers in 12 hours before falling asleep on the floor.When they tried to awaken him, they found that he had vomited during the night and his heart was not beating.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 11, 1993
Belgian scientists have invented a new treatment for male infertility that they say may allow virtually any man, no matter how few or misshapen or immobile his sperm cells, to father a child.The method, developed by Dr. Andre C. Van Steirteghem of the Brussels Free University in Belgium, involves the direct injection of a single human sperm into a human egg in a petri dish.Scientists had thought such a technique would never work, because it bypasses the complex chemical reactions that take place when the membrane of a sperm meets the membrane of an egg, and because no one, including Dr. Van Steirteghem, has succeeded in fertilizing animal eggs by directly injecting sperm.
NEWS
By John Gearhart | April 4, 2005
OVERWHELMING scientific opinion supports embryonic stem cell research, and many believe it has the potential to revolutionize medicine. The American Medical Association and the National Academy of Sciences have endorsed embryonic stem cell research, and a statewide survey conducted by Gonzales Research & Marketing Strategies in February determined that 78 percent of Marylanders support stem cell research using surplus embryos from in vitro fertilization clinics....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
Dr. Georgeanna Seegar Jones, a former professor of gynecology and obstetrics at Johns Hopkins Hospital who, with her husband Dr. Howard W. Jones Jr., became an internationally known pioneer in the field of in vitro fertilization, died of cardiac arrest yesterday at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in Virginia. She was 92. "They established the in vitro fertilization program at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Va., that produced the first in vitro baby in the United States," Dr. Theodore A. Baramki, associate professor of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said yesterday.
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