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By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | December 12, 2007
Saving water in the kitchen isn't just the right thing to do during a drought. It's the right thing to do all of the time. Sure, it's important to use clean water when we prepare food. But much of the water we use in our kitchens spills right down the sink, where it goes back to the water treatment plant without doing anyone any good. Getting into these habits not only saves water -- it can make your cooking more healthful and even tastier. Tips When you get a drink of water, don't run the faucet until the water is cool.
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HEALTH
By Debra Schulze, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly provides a guest post. This week, Debra Schulze weighs in on fall fruits and vegetables. The chill of fall is in the air along with the bright red, orange and yellow colors of the leaves. Fall offers many fruits and vegetables that are delicious and packed with nutritional benefits. This is the best time of year to experience the red pomegranates, the orange winter squash, the yellow peppers along with many other members of the season's bounty.
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NEWS
December 29, 2008
Older people taking risky mix of drugs, supplements At least 2 million older Americans are taking a combination of drugs or supplements that can be a risky mix - from blood thinners and cholesterol pills to aspirin and ginkgo capsules - a new study warns. Among older men, the numbers are particularly alarming - one in 10 are taking potentially harmful combinations, according to the study. The results aren't always disastrous, but older people are more vulnerable to side effects and drug-to-drug interactions.
SPORTS
By Jacqueline R. Berning, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
As a sport dietitian, I find it very interesting to be on the sideline listening to what parents and players have to say about feeding and hydrating lacrosse players. Where do they get this information? Do they really believe that three Red Bulls before a game will improve performance? Here are the three common sports nutrition myths heard on the sidelines: MYTH: Players do not need to eat carbohydrates because lacrosse is a sprinting sport, not an endurance event. FACT: The game of lacrosse involves lots of sprinting and jogging, and very little walking.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Looking for the fountain of youth? If you believe those television ads depicting active, healthy seniors downing cans of liquid nutritional supplements, you might be tempted to think it's been bottled and placed on a grocery shelf near you. But before you rush to stock up on "meals in a can," chew on this: Experts say most people can get the nutrient requirements they need from eating a well-balanced diet. "These supplements are touted as energy boosters and essential to good health for anyone over 50," says Patricia Froberg, registered dietitian and consulting nutritionist for the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | January 19, 1993
While shopping the other day I ran into Steve, the bread man as he was stocking the shelves. Curious, I asked if he had noticed any trends in the type of bread folks are buying.He said he can hardly keep Pepperidge Farm's Seven Grain on the shelves. He said, that Seven Grain had gotten him off white bread. Now it's the only bread he eats.Pepperidge Farm's Seven Grain is a good first step for most Americans raised on white bread. Although enriched flour is its ,, first ingredient, it does contain enough wheat bran, rice bran and oat bran to bring its dietary fiber total to 1 gram per slice.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2005
If I drink VitaWater, do I still need to take a daily vitamin? Yes, you do, says Angela Ginn-Meadow, registered dietitian and nutritionist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. "A multivitamin provides 100 percent of B-complex and other essential vitamins and minerals, whereas a VitaWater only provides a small percentage of your RDA [recommended daily allowance]," says Ginn-Meadow. Vitamin-infused water can't hurt, but you'll get more bang for your buck with a multivitamin. According to Ginn-Meadow, VitaWater provides only 25 percent to 50 percent of your recommended daily allowance of B-complex vitamins (the presence of vitamins and minerals such as zinc, folic acid and magnesium varies depending on the water's flavoring)
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 1995
Are your kids eating enough fiber? Probably not.Food consumption surveys done by the U.S. Department of Agriculture show that American kids, like American adults, eat only half the fiber they need for good health.For children, dietary fiber is especially important to prevent constipation and reduce the risk of obesity, according to physician Christine L. Williams, in research published recently in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association to launch its multi-year Child Nutrition and Health Campaign.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D | October 23, 1990
Calcium supplementation reduced bone loss in post-menopausal women, a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrated.But before you rush to the pharmacy to restock your pill supply, read on.Significant outcomes of the study were:*Adequate calcium intake did retard bone loss in some women who were six or more years past menopause.*Only women with very low calcium intakes were helped by supplementation.The current Recommended Dietary Allowance for calcium for women over 25 years old is 800 mg per day.Women in this study were divided into two groups.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
Mom's way: an open book No one cooks like mom. Now here's a way to record the recipes of the woman who nursed you with chicken soup and cooked fabulous Thanksgiving dinners - personalized cookbooks with pages to write down recipes, hints and notes. The spiral-bound books are the creation of Catonsville resident Denise D. Kinney and her friend Lynne J. Smith of Raleigh, N.C. So far, they have created four versions of their books - one for brides, one for expectant mothers, one for holidays and one for girlfriends.
NEWS
December 29, 2008
Older people taking risky mix of drugs, supplements At least 2 million older Americans are taking a combination of drugs or supplements that can be a risky mix - from blood thinners and cholesterol pills to aspirin and ginkgo capsules - a new study warns. Among older men, the numbers are particularly alarming - one in 10 are taking potentially harmful combinations, according to the study. The results aren't always disastrous, but older people are more vulnerable to side effects and drug-to-drug interactions.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | September 8, 2008
Peter Barry isn't a doctor, a nutritionist or even an herbal healer, but customers constantly stroll into Baltimore's OK Natural Food Store seeking his advice on vitamins. What's he got for hypertension? For energy? And the one everyone whispers: sexual enhancement? A natural foods salesman for 22 years, Barry takes a few supplements of his own, but he thinks consumers are desperate for a magic pill. Standing before a giant wall of bottles bearing such labels as coral calcium, B-50 and Change-O-Life Blend, he offers his standard recommendation: "grandma's cooking."
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | December 12, 2007
Saving water in the kitchen isn't just the right thing to do during a drought. It's the right thing to do all of the time. Sure, it's important to use clean water when we prepare food. But much of the water we use in our kitchens spills right down the sink, where it goes back to the water treatment plant without doing anyone any good. Getting into these habits not only saves water -- it can make your cooking more healthful and even tastier. Tips When you get a drink of water, don't run the faucet until the water is cool.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2005
If I drink VitaWater, do I still need to take a daily vitamin? Yes, you do, says Angela Ginn-Meadow, registered dietitian and nutritionist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. "A multivitamin provides 100 percent of B-complex and other essential vitamins and minerals, whereas a VitaWater only provides a small percentage of your RDA [recommended daily allowance]," says Ginn-Meadow. Vitamin-infused water can't hurt, but you'll get more bang for your buck with a multivitamin. According to Ginn-Meadow, VitaWater provides only 25 percent to 50 percent of your recommended daily allowance of B-complex vitamins (the presence of vitamins and minerals such as zinc, folic acid and magnesium varies depending on the water's flavoring)
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
He adopted a spiritual name years ago whose Indian translation means "holy man." But to his customers, Sadhu Khalsa is simply the vitamin man. A vitamin specialist at the Rite Aid store on Martin Luther King Boulevard in the city, Khalsa helps customers navigate the vast array of supplements -- vitamins, minerals, herbs and more -- that line the shelves. A decade ago, consumers would have been hard-pressed to find much more than a multivitamin in most supermarkets and drugstores, let alone a vitamin specialist.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
Mom's way: an open book No one cooks like mom. Now here's a way to record the recipes of the woman who nursed you with chicken soup and cooked fabulous Thanksgiving dinners - personalized cookbooks with pages to write down recipes, hints and notes. The spiral-bound books are the creation of Catonsville resident Denise D. Kinney and her friend Lynne J. Smith of Raleigh, N.C. So far, they have created four versions of their books - one for brides, one for expectant mothers, one for holidays and one for girlfriends.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,King Features Syndicate | August 29, 1995
No truce has been declared. No victories claimed. But the vitamin wars are virtually over.A few years ago Congress was deluged with letters from people who feared the Food and Drug Administration was going to restrict access to supplements. Visions of commando squads bursting in on stores selling vitamins had health food entrepreneurs up in arms.On one side nutritional nihilists maintained that supplements were silly, a waste of money leading to expensive urine. Their battle cry was straightforward: "Eat a well-balanced diet!"
NEWS
By James F. Smith and James F. Smith,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 1999
SAN ILDEFONSO, Mexico -- At just 1 month old, Maria Isabel Esquivel is chubby, smiling and alert, and her older brother and sisters now run with bounding strides through the family's tiny cornfield in this dirt-poor Indian village.The vigor of the Esquivel children brings to life the startling statistics that are emerging from several ambitious nutrition projects in the Mexican countryside.The goal is nothing short of transforming the humble tortilla, Mexico's corn-based staple food, into a protein-fortified "supertortilla" that would give a nutritional boost to the nearly 20 million Mexicans who live in extreme poverty.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Looking for the fountain of youth? If you believe those television ads depicting active, healthy seniors downing cans of liquid nutritional supplements, you might be tempted to think it's been bottled and placed on a grocery shelf near you. But before you rush to stock up on "meals in a can," chew on this: Experts say most people can get the nutrient requirements they need from eating a well-balanced diet. "These supplements are touted as energy boosters and essential to good health for anyone over 50," says Patricia Froberg, registered dietitian and consulting nutritionist for the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington.
NEWS
By James F. Smith and James F. Smith,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 1999
SAN ILDEFONSO, Mexico -- At just 1 month old, Maria Isabel Esquivel is chubby, smiling and alert, and her older brother and sisters now run with bounding strides through the family's tiny cornfield in this dirt-poor Indian village.The vigor of the Esquivel children brings to life the startling statistics that are emerging from several ambitious nutrition projects in the Mexican countryside.The goal is nothing short of transforming the humble tortilla, Mexico's corn-based staple food, into a protein-fortified "supertortilla" that would give a nutritional boost to the nearly 20 million Mexicans who live in extreme poverty.
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