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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 18, 2012
Large doses of Vitamin C may moderately reduce blood pressure, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. But the scientists don't recommend people start taking large amounts of the vitamin. Researchers led by Dr. Edgar "Pete" R. Miller, an associate professor in the division of general interal medicine at Hopkins, reviewed and analyzed data from 29 previous  clinical trials and found that taking 500 milligrams of Vitamin C daily, or five times the recommended amount, could lower blood pressure by 3.84 millimeters.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Alfred Sommer, a former Johns Hopkins University dean who discovered the importance of vitamin A in preventing child blindness, will accept an award Sunday in Israel honoring his contributions to preventive medicine. Sommer was chosen as a laureate of the Dan David Prize, bestowed in various fields by Tel Aviv University. He shares the $1 million prize with Esther Duflo, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist being honored for her work on poverty. The Dan David Foundation awards three prizes each year - one for achievements focused on the past, one for the present, and one, as in Sommer's case, for the future.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 9, 2008
Maybe it was the sight of all those fat Florida oranges being tossed in the air by the Kansas Jayhawks football players as they celebrated their televised victory over Virginia Tech in the Orange Bowl. Or maybe it was the knowledge that when the worst of winter hits here, luscious oranges imported from sunny climes arrive in the produce aisle. Or maybe I just needed a big dose of vitamin C. For whatever reason, I woke up the other morning craving fresh-squeezed orange juice. I hit the juice-bar trail.
NEWS
April 25, 2012
Roger Clemens is a selfish, self-serving liar ("'Trapped' in a pack of lies," April 24). How can it be justified that, in the latter years his career, he suddenly had an incredible amount of success? Blind luck? A relentless training regimen, perhaps? Or maybe it was it the vitamin B12, as Clemens stated his injections contained. Who in their proper mind would inject vitamins? This is simply a sad case of a man who is desperately trying to cling to his fading hopes of being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
FEATURES
By King Features Syndicate | November 24, 1992
Q: My wife is convinced that vitamins keep her healthy. She takes a fistful every morning. The kitchen table is littered with vitamin C, beta carotene, folic acid, zinc, vitamin E and goodness knows what else.I don't take a thing and feel great at 68. I eat healthy food and walk two miles every day. She keeps pushing her health food publications at me and wants me to take vitamins too. I think the whole thing is a waste of good money. Please tell her to ease up.A: Perhaps we can change your mind instead.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 25, 2003
For quick energy, is an expensive energy bar really that much better than a candy bar? There's nothing magic about an energy bar. Energy comes from calories, so if your energy bar has the same number of calories as a candy bar (most do), it will provide the same amount of fuel for your body. The key is to read the labels, says Sandra DeLong, a registered dietician at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. While energy bars are usually high in vitamins and minerals, I've heard nutritionists compare them to candy bars with a vitamin pill stuck inside.
NEWS
May 28, 2003
A Johns Hopkins University dean who discovered the life-saving potential of vitamin A was awarded a prestigious public health prize yesterday in Boston. Dr. Alfred Sommer, 60, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, received the 15th annual Alpert Foundation Prize, given to researchers who have come up with medical discoveries that have led to important advances in public health. Sommer expressed pride in the honor: "It's one of the few awards for scientific discovery that requires that the discovery actually improves the lives of people."
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | May 28, 1991
Q: I have been told by my doctor to take vitamin B-6, but no more than 150 mg a day because overdoses of this vitamin can cause nerve damage. What is the nerve damage and what are jTC the symptoms of it?A: The B vitamins had always been considered extremely safeeven in large amounts, until 1983, when scientists reported seven adults who developed severe abnormalities of their sensory nervous system while taking large doses of vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine). These individuals had taken 2 to 6 grams of B-6 daily for periods from two months to more than three years.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a controversial rule opposed by some nutritionists and consumers, the Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that it will require makers of vitamins, minerals and herbs to substantiate their health claims.The FDA did not go as far as restricting vitamin potencies or limiting consumer access to herbs and amino acids, as the agency had indicated it might do last summer.But the new standards require that any health claim -- such as preventing cancer or promoting virility -- "must be supported by significant scientific agreement among qualified experts."
HEALTH
By Gerri Kobren | September 25, 1990
Last week's report that high doses of vitamin A prevent certain cancers came as no surprise to health-watchers.Essential for maintenance of normal skin, eyes and tissues that line the mouth, throat and internal organs, vitamin A was also recognized as a possible cancer preventative at least a decade ago: People who consumed a lot of it were found to be less likely to have cancer than were people with low intake.The first human experiment in which the suspected cancer-preventing power was demonstrated was at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and was reported in the New England Journal of Medicine last week.
SPORTS
By Jacqueline R. Berning, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
As a sport dietitian, I find it very interesting to be on the sideline listening to what parents and players have to say about feeding and hydrating lacrosse players. Where do they get this information? Do they really believe that three Red Bulls before a game will improve performance? Here are the three common sports nutrition myths heard on the sidelines: MYTH: Players do not need to eat carbohydrates because lacrosse is a sprinting sport, not an endurance event. FACT: The game of lacrosse involves lots of sprinting and jogging, and very little walking.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 18, 2012
Large doses of Vitamin C may moderately reduce blood pressure, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. But the scientists don't recommend people start taking large amounts of the vitamin. Researchers led by Dr. Edgar "Pete" R. Miller, an associate professor in the division of general interal medicine at Hopkins, reviewed and analyzed data from 29 previous  clinical trials and found that taking 500 milligrams of Vitamin C daily, or five times the recommended amount, could lower blood pressure by 3.84 millimeters.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 8, 2011
Peppers are, arguably, among the easiest home garden crops to grow. Problem is, they take forever to do so. They usually don't come into their own until after the tomatoes are gone and the herbs are exhausted from the heat. So, herby, tomato-ey, peppery sauces become somewhat problematic. We can still do a lot with peppers, though, whether they're "plain old" bell peppers or more exotic varieties. Sticking good stuff inside them is a great approach. This way, we can create main courses — many of them pretty much one-dish meals — that will take us through these early back-to-school evenings when we're still using local produce but looking for something a bit more substantial for supper than raw veggies and cold meat.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
A bad diet may lead to bad health for many inner-city kids. And it may also lead to bad behavior. That's the conclusion of some public health experts who are advocating for vitamins and other nutritional supplements to curb youth violence and to increase learning. The controversial idea is getting a fresh hearing in Baltimore, where advocates for the disadvantaged are considering testing it on city kids. If it's proven that a tablet a day can tick up test scores and dial down violence, it could be a cheaper and easier means of improving a lot of young lives than costly and labor-intensive treatments, according to the Abell Foundation, which wants to determine whether a Baltimore study would be worthwhile.
HEALTH
By Jill Rosen | March 18, 2010
T here must have been a time when Steve Kain's nose wasn't stuffed up - but he can't remember it. The 33-year-old information technology expert from Columbia has had chronic sinus conditions since he was a kid. The sniffles were like a lifestyle, and he gulped Claritin, Sudafed, Theraflu, Benadryl - anything to try to feel better. But last year, Kain mentioned his sorry sinuses to an acupuncturist. She sent him home with what was to be the prescription he'd been waiting for: Buy a Neti pot. Though he had to get past the feeling "that I was sticking a little genie lamp into my nose," running the salt water through his nasal passages helped almost immediately.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | December 14, 2009
Question: : My son, age 14, has suffered from chronic idiopathic urticaria (hives) for five years. Several months ago, your column featured another person suffering from hives. He had success with vitamin C, so we decided to try it. My son is now taking 1,000 mg of vitamin C twice a day. He has been able to stop two of his three medications, Zyrtec and famotidine. With his doctor's approval, he has halved his Allegra prescription. We are so thankful! Answer: : We found nothing recent in the medical literature on this approach.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
A Johns Hopkins University dean who discovered the life-saving potential of vitamin A was awarded a prestigious public health prize yesterday in Boston. Dr. Alfred Sommer, 60, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, received the 15th annual Alpert Foundation Prize, given to researchers who have come up with medical discoveries that have led to important advances in public health. Sommer expressed pride in the honor: "It's one of the few awards for scientific discovery that requires that the discovery actually improves the lives of people."
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | December 14, 2009
Question: : My son, age 14, has suffered from chronic idiopathic urticaria (hives) for five years. Several months ago, your column featured another person suffering from hives. He had success with vitamin C, so we decided to try it. My son is now taking 1,000 mg of vitamin C twice a day. He has been able to stop two of his three medications, Zyrtec and famotidine. With his doctor's approval, he has halved his Allegra prescription. We are so thankful! Answer: : We found nothing recent in the medical literature on this approach.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | March 9, 2009
Thank you for writing about taking vitamin B-2 on a daily basis to prevent migraine headaches. I have suffered from them for 17 years and have been to many doctors, including two neurologists, two ear, nose and throat doctors and an acupuncturist. I had sinus scans and have tried many medications that never worked. I started taking the vitamin B-2, and I couldn't believe how much it helped. I may get an occasional headache now, once a month if that. I used to get a couple every week. I am thrilled to finally be free of headaches for the most part and have told my doctor to please share this with other patients with frequent migraine headaches.
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