Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVital Signs
IN THE NEWS

Vital Signs

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | August 8, 1991
AFTER choreographer Marta Renzi auditioned a cluster of trained dancers and "non-dancers" in Baltimore last spring, a vision formed in her mind. It was dictated by the disparate talents and fortunes of those she chose to work with during this year's Diverse Works.Among her impromptu troupe, are an accomplished Irish step dancer, a man who is HIV positive, and a woman who suffers from diabetes. Seven other individuals, some svelte and polished, some ungainly and undisciplined, add to her eclectic mix."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | February 17, 2013
Funny Approval went to the front and never looked back, posting an upset victory in the $250,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap at Laurel Park on Saturday. A maiden win and two allowance scores at Mountaineer Park over the off-going were the credentials Funny Approval brought to Laurel's seven-furlong Winter SprintFest fixture, leaving the daughter of Outrageouslyfunny a distinct outsider in the field of eight fillies and mares. Trainer Jose Lopez and jockey Juan Vargas were also virtual unknowns in the Mid-Atlantic region, but they won't be after Saturday.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
A dozen paramedic students at Anne Arundel Community College crowd around the hospital bed, feeling all over the patient's body for a pulse. Some of them press fingers against his throat and his feet, while others listen for a heartbeat through stethoscopes. A few students feel around his pelvis for the harder-to-locate femoral pulse point. "Oh, I found it!" exclaims Dawn Lusby, 20. "You feel the ridge?" she asks her classmates, indicating the patient's protruding pelvic bone. "It's right above the ridge."
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
Early last week, before Barbaro was diagnosed with the complication of laminitis in his left hind foot and with an infection in his broken right hind leg, Dr. Kathleen Anderson said the Kentucky Derby winner was letting his doctors know something was wrong. "We're always monitoring blood work and X-rays," said Anderson, Barbaro's personal veterinarian. "But the foremost way he lets us know how he is managing is by his comfort level. You can tell by his demeanor how he is doing. Has he stopped eating?
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2002
IN THE CLIFTON-BEREA section of East Baltimore, nearly half the homes are either vacant or in violation of city housing codes. In Greater Rosemont on the west side, more than one call per month was made to the city last year to tow away an abandoned car. In Patterson Park in the southeast, almost 250 permits were issued for substantial residential rehabs, about as many as in Fells Point and behind only Canton and Federal Hill. These are just a sampling of the thousands of figures in a fascinating new report from the Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance titled "Vital Signs for Baltimore Neighborhoods" and subtitled "Measuring Baltimore's progress towards strong neighborhoods and a vital city."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
FROM THE start of the decade to the end of last year, the average time it took for a house on the market in Baltimore to be sold was nearly halved, to 28 days. In the Charles Village/Barclay area of North Baltimore, where housing prices rose by nearly a third, the drop was even more drastic, from 49 days to 10. In the Howard Park/West Arlington section of Northwest, however, where housing prices rose hardly at all, it took about the same amount of time -- seven weeks -- for a house to sell last year as it did in 2000.
NEWS
May 7, 1998
Clarksville school raises $15,000 to fight rare diseaseThe St. Louis School in Clarksville raised more than $15,000 to fight primary pulmonary hypertension, a rare and serious disease afflicting a fifth-grader there, a spokeswoman said.In March, students collected pledges for shooting basketballs or jumping rope during their gym classes. The event was inspired by 10-year-old Cristin Gildea's struggle with the disease, which requires her to have medicine pumped into her bloodstream 24 hours a day. PPH restricts blood flow to the lungs.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
Shares in Visicu Inc. surged more than 16 percent yesterday after the Baltimore developer of remote monitoring equipment reported increased earnings and revenue guidance. Visicu shares closed yesterday at $8.75, up $1.23 for the day. The price had been on a steady slide since a flashy initial public offering in April. Its $24.78 price at the end of the first day of trading remains its all-time high close. Driving the decline, analysts said, was a failure to register new sales. In Thursday's earnings release, Visicu said its revenue this year would increase 63 percent to 64 percent over last year, compared with previous guidance of 53 to 56 percent, and that its operating margins were improving as well.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Overall population has declined in Baltimore since 2000, although some communities have flourished, according to Vital Signs, an occasional report that charts trends in neighborhoods by a variety of measurements. The report analyzes data from 80 indicators provided by the city's planning department. About 270 city neighborhoods are broken down into census-tract boundaries, and while the city has lost about 3 percent of its residents since 2000, several communities have experienced a population boom, including downtown (22 percent growth)
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2009
Salary: $32,000 Age: 32 Years on the job: 10 How she got started: After high school, Erica Small knew she wanted to go into the medical field and started taking classes at what is now Stevenson University. She switched to the Community College of Baltimore County and became certified as an emergency medical technician and a certified nursing assistant. While still in school, she began working as a patient service associate in Sinai Hospital's emergency room. When she graduated from CCBC, she began working in the same department as a critical care technician.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
Shares in Visicu Inc. surged more than 16 percent yesterday after the Baltimore developer of remote monitoring equipment reported increased earnings and revenue guidance. Visicu shares closed yesterday at $8.75, up $1.23 for the day. The price had been on a steady slide since a flashy initial public offering in April. Its $24.78 price at the end of the first day of trading remains its all-time high close. Driving the decline, analysts said, was a failure to register new sales. In Thursday's earnings release, Visicu said its revenue this year would increase 63 percent to 64 percent over last year, compared with previous guidance of 53 to 56 percent, and that its operating margins were improving as well.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
Early last week, before Barbaro was diagnosed with the complication of laminitis in his left hind foot and with an infection in his broken right hind leg, Dr. Kathleen Anderson said the Kentucky Derby winner was letting his doctors know something was wrong. "We're always monitoring blood work and X-rays," said Anderson, Barbaro's personal veterinarian. "But the foremost way he lets us know how he is managing is by his comfort level. You can tell by his demeanor how he is doing. Has he stopped eating?
NEWS
By DANIEL LUBETZKY AND FATHI DARWISH | April 9, 2006
Whoever best learns the lessons from the West Bank city of Qalqilyah will determine the future of Palestine and will greatly influence Israeli-Palestinian relations and the future of democratization in the Arab world. Qalqilyah, situated on the frontier with Israel about nine miles from the Mediterranean Sea, is the only city where Hamas won zero district seats in the Jan. 25 Palestinian Legislative Council elections. This is remarkable because Qalqilyah is also the only city where Hamas had assumed complete municipal power after sweeping elections a year ago. The city is known for its staunch, sometimes violent opposition to the Israeli occupation.
NEWS
By Christina Hernandez and Christina Hernandez,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
Students training to be medical assistants at Cecil Community College in North East used to perform exam techniques on one another, a practice with one glaring drawback. "We're all pretty healthy," said Linda Wirt, a medical assistant instructor. The same cannot be said for Cecil and Cecilia, two patient simulators that arrived on campus recently. By fall, the simulators will be integrated into the curriculum of 170 students. The 85-pound, 5-foot- 8-inch mannequins, controlled by computers, exhibit vital signs, make noise and can be used to practice procedures such as drawing blood.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
NEWS
June 26, 1994
Enough of O.J., of flesh-eating bacteria, of massacres, wars and heat waves. It's time for some good news, or at least an upbeat perspective.Let's start with the bacteria that, according to one lurid tabloid confessional, "ate my face." It's true, a form of streptococcus bacteria that destroys flesh is alive and well. But -- good news -- the odds are slim the average person will become food for another tabloid headline, or that grim and grisly forms of strep infections are arising. The number of cases fits normal patterns; there is no epidemic.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2005
On a recent frigid and wet evening at the Woodlawn Volunteer Fire Company, students from Woodlawn High School bundled up and happily shoveled the snow from the front of the station. Then the alarm sounded. Wesley Watson, a 17-year-old junior, raced into the firehouse and hopped aboard an ambulance with two of the department's paramedics. They raced -- sirens blaring and lights flashing -- to a car accident on Dogwood Road, where Watson helped take an injured person's vital signs. Watson and the other students are enrolled in a new Emergency Medical Services and Fire Rescue class at Woodlawn High.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
FROM THE start of the decade to the end of last year, the average time it took for a house on the market in Baltimore to be sold was nearly halved, to 28 days. In the Charles Village/Barclay area of North Baltimore, where housing prices rose by nearly a third, the drop was even more drastic, from 49 days to 10. In the Howard Park/West Arlington section of Northwest, however, where housing prices rose hardly at all, it took about the same amount of time -- seven weeks -- for a house to sell last year as it did in 2000.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.