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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
A former employee at the Maryland School for the Blind has filed a federal lawsuit against the Northeast Baltimore school, saying supervisors discriminated against her because of her visual impairment. Sheila Fox, a former instructional assistant, said the school failed to accommodate blind and visually impaired workers -- for example, by not making written materials distributed at staff meetings available in Braille. At times, supervisors accused the Bel Air woman of "playing the poor blind girl," according to her complaint filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Around the dawn of the 6th century, the philosopher Boethius noted that "music is part of us, and either ennobles or degrades our behavior. " It's still hard to argue with him. In the centuries after Boethius, artists illuminated music's benefits and potential pitfalls in remarkable ways, producing the sorts of works that form an intimate new exhibit at the Walters Art Museum. "Seeing Music in Medieval Manuscripts," which will be on display into mid-October, was curated by Chiara Valle, the Zanvyl Krieger Fellow in the Department of Manuscripts and Rare Books at the museum.
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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks | November 24, 1991
* PERSONAL: Age 87. Retired as a registered nurse. Has lived in Columbia for 12 years, originally from North Carolina.* WHERE DO YOU VOLUNTEER? "Many places. Florence Bain Senior Center, Red Cross, Columbia Festival of Arts this year and I'm signed up for next. I read to the visually impaired at Vantage House, a retirement community here, and I teach students who are learning the American language. For years I volunteered as a nurse for football, baseball and county fairs. I also tutored in elementary schools for many years."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
In TV terms, there were two winners and one clear loser in Tuesday's night gubernatorial debate on WBFF-TV. The winners: State Delegate Heather Mizeur and the TV station itself. The loser: Lt. Governor Anthony Brown, who declined to participate in Baltimore's only TV debate and was represented by an empty podium between his two opponents, Mizeur and Attorney General Doug Gansler. Fox 45 wins for its skilled use of TV imagery. The empty podium with Brown's name on the front was a perfect symbol for a candidate who looks as if he refuses to be held accountable to the people he wants to serve, of a candidate who will decide based on the terms of his political goals, not the citizens' need for information before going to the polls, how engaged he is going -- or not going -- to be with the voters.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
A flash card the size of an envelope could make traveling around Baltimore much easier for the blind.Under a six-week experiment that started Monday, 20 visually impaired Mass Transit Administration customers have been asked to use the cards when traveling on 32 of the agency's 66 bus routes around the city.The cards, developed in Savannah, Ga., are used at bus stops to signal bus drivers. The technique is a reversal on the way limousine drivers find arriving air passengers by holding up signs with their names.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
The American Foundation for the Blind will honor a Maryland congressman and two U.S. senators who were instrumental in the passage of the American Disabilities Act.The honorees are Md. Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, D-5th, and Sens. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, and Tom Harkin, D-Iowa.The awards are to be presented March 13 at a benefit dinner at "Twin Oaks" Estate in Washington.The act, signed into law on last July 26, provides opportunities in employment, education, and social and recreational settings for more that 40 million Americans with disabilities.
SPORTS
By Hal Habib and Hal Habib,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 20, 1994
MIAMI -- Carlos Talbott, a legally blind runner from Miami Springs who rose to international prominence, died last night after being struck by a car while running in Cooper City.He was 37.Talbott was running with Ralph Guijarro, a regular training partner, when Guijarro warned Talbott cars were approaching. Talbott tried to stop but slipped on the wet pavement near a median, falling in front of the car.L The name of the driver and other details were not available.Talbott and Guijarro were mapping out a course for the new South Florida Striders runners club.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | November 7, 1994
Joyce Hinton, a retired nurse whose work and volunteer activities touched people in four states, died Wednesday of a heart attack at her home in Columbia. She was 90.Mrs. Hinton's commitment to helping others began in Florida in 1926, when she came to the aid of hurricane victims as a Red Cross volunteer. Her dedication was still evident two weeks ago at Vantage House Retirement Community in Columbia, where she read to the visually impaired."She helped so many people and lived a very rich life," said her son-in-law, Frank Westbrook of Columbia.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 5, 1994
Helen Glazer has done it again. I've sung the praises of the Goucher College exhibitions director before, but it's worth repeating that she consistently comes up with thematically thoughtful, visually satisfying shows. Then she goes a significant step farther and gives viewers an intelligent, cogent accompanying essay.Her latest is "Schemata," featuring painter Mokha Laget and sculptor Yuriko Yamaguchi, both from the Washington area. Schemata is the plural of schema, meaning plan or systematic arrangement, and both of these artists work with such arrangements.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
Margaret E. Walker, a special-education teacher who taught for more than 30 years at the Maryland School for the Blind, died of ovarian cancer Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 61. Born Margaret E. Barrett in Washington, she was a graduate of High Point High School in Beltsville. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1962 from what was then Towson State Teachers College, and later earned a master's degree in special education from Loyola College. Mrs. Walker, who was visually impaired, began teaching at the Maryland School for the Blind on Taylor Avenue in 1962.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
At Annapolis High School, student dancers and actors rehearse in an airy, two-story studio. Visual arts students fire their ceramic creations in a trio of kilns. Graphics students work in a lab filled with new computers with wide, flat-screen monitors. Film and production students fine-tune their creations on a mixing board worthy of a professional recording studio. For a few months now, students at Annapolis High - both those in a performing and visual arts magnet program and other students - have been exploring their creative talents in the school's new two-story addition.
ENTERTAINMENT
b staff | December 18, 2013
MICA graduate Haggag, 26, was named director of the Contemporary Museum this year. Exhibits are listed in reverse chronological order.  Seth Adelsberger, "Surface Treatment," Springsteen Gallery, Nov. 22-Jan. 10, 2014 Springsteen Gallery isn't even a year old and they've already left one hell of a mark on our arts scene. Seth Adelsberger's exhibition is sharp and a wanton change towards process that I very much enjoyed. I am looking forward to his solo exhibition opening June 2014 at the Baltimore Museum of Art and encourage everyone to catch his work at Springsteen while you can. Also, someone please, please, please buy me an Adelsberger for Christmas.  Multiple Artists, "Paint it Black, Guest Spot," Nov. 9-Jan.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
The passing of Nelson Mandela illustrates a wonderful lesson of life. Here is a man, imprisoned for 27 years, who could have been, upon his release, bitter at the world. Instead, he believed, his fellow South Africans needed his positive leadership. He will be remembered as a person who visualized the brightness of life, and achieved that goal. Every individual should strive to that objective. Al Liebeskind President, Columbia Democratic Club
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
As Gov. Martin O'Malley and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have battled in recent weeks over crime-fighting strategies, both have come up with diagrams to illustrate their positions. O'Malley makes his argument with dueling trend lines that show crime declines leveled off as arrests dropped since his time at City Hall. Rawlings-Blake submits that arrests alone aren't the key to stopping violence, citing a chart that shows shootings and homicides at lower levels now than during O'Malley's tenure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Jim Lucio, who succeeded Gary Kachadourian as visual arts coordinator for Artscape in 2009, has resigned. An imaginative artist, Lucio won praise for spicing things up at Artscape, the annual summer event in Baltimore billed as the country's largest free arts festival. In his first year, he instigated interactive projects that involved an interactive video and a giant graphic novel. Since then, he was been credited with keeping the visual arts scene at Artscape invigorating.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
I was glad to see The Sun editorial board express strong support for the Baltimore art scene and the role that organizations like The Contemporary play in the vitality of the city's cultural life ("The Contemporary returns," July 8). Yet it is with some irony that I note the editorial's enthusiastic endorsement "for what a Sun critic once called 'the art of right now.'" The Sun has not had a full-time art critic since 2008. I am an artist and former exhibitions director at Goucher College during the golden age of Baltimore art criticism, when all four shows we put on each season were likely to be reviewed by both The Sun and the City Paper.
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 24, 2002
In Baltimore City Police arrest man accused of ordering woman killed An East Baltimore man suspected of ordering the death of a female neighbor who allegedly was competing with him in the marijuana trade has been arrested and charged in her death. The gunman, police said, was being sought yesterday. Detective Gordon Carew said Donta J. Clowney, 28, of the 800 block of N. Patterson Park Ave. was arrested Tuesday near his home and charged with murder in the death of Erica Barnes, 26, of the same block.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | September 20, 1990
If you've ever read an art review and finished it griping that the critic must have gone through the exhibit with his eyes closed, below is a review about which you'd be absolutely right. In fact, this critic would be the first to agree with you."Access to Art: Bringing Folk Art Closer" is an exhibit designed to present folk art to those who are visually impaired or who have other physical handicaps that hinder their ability to enjoy the usual museum installation. Organized by the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, this exhibit is currently at the Baltimore Museum of Art as part of a 13-city national tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Artist Mia Wiener embroiders provocative images on white linen because she's fascinated by the intimate nature of textiles and by the way that most people take them for granted. Emily C-D creates collages in her native Baltimore and also in Mexico from materials that other people throw away: discarded newspapers, bottle tops, string, and old pots and pans. And Ashley Minner crafts nearly life-size portraits of Baltimore's Native-American Lumbee community that revel in the beauty and strength of the people with whom she grew up. The women are part of the generation that will determine the form that the visual arts will take here in the future and are being highlighted in "Thirty: 30 Creative Minds Under 30," a group of 10 gallery talks sponsored by Maryland Art Place . The trio have been selected to present their artwork in the debut presentation on Wednesday; the remaining nine events will take place roughly once a month.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
No idea what sort of job might suit you? A Middle River software company that fuses applications and psychology has a personality test for that - one built around images rather than questions. Compass Lite, which went public last week and launched more officially on Monday, is tech firm Woofound's twist on the personality assessments taken by hordes of students, job candidates and online surfers. Woofound's app has participants rate 84 photos - of everything from artwork to a camping tent - as either "me" or "not me. " Then it spits out a personality type, such as "planner/inventor," along with career recommendations and information about those job possibilities.
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