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NEWS
July 17, 2013
I was glad to see The Sun editorial board express strong support for the Baltimore art scene and the role that organizations like The Contemporary play in the vitality of the city's cultural life ("The Contemporary returns," July 8). Yet it is with some irony that I note the editorial's enthusiastic endorsement "for what a Sun critic once called 'the art of right now.'" The Sun has not had a full-time art critic since 2008. I am an artist and former exhibitions director at Goucher College during the golden age of Baltimore art criticism, when all four shows we put on each season were likely to be reviewed by both The Sun and the City Paper.
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NEWS
October 10, 2014
Sunday, Oct. 12 Monthly meeting The Columbia Ski Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at the Doubletree Hotel, 5485 Twin Knolls Road in Columbia. Guests are welcome. For more information, go to columbiaski6club.org. Monday, Oct. 13 Fine arts The Howard County Public Schools Fine Arts Advisory Council holds its annual Fine Arts College Night from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Howard High School, 8700 Old Annapolis Road in Ellicott City. Evening is for all parents and students interested in pursuing a higher education in dance, music, theater or the visual arts.
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NEWS
September 9, 2005
MUSEUMS Academy Art Museum. 106 South St., Easton, 410-822-2787. Sept. 9-Oct. 22: The Cup and Three Quarters: The Art of James von Minor American Visionary Art Museum.800 Key Highway, 410-244-1900, www.avam.org. Oct. 1 --Sept. 3, 2006: Race, Class, Gender [doesn't equal] - CHARACTER Baltimore Museum of Art.10 Art Museum Drive, 410-396-7100, www.artbma.org. Oct. 2-Dec. 31: Monet's London: Artists' Reflections on the Thames, 1859-1914 Nov. 2-27: Cram Sessions: 04 Counter-Campus Nov. 9-May 14: American Indian Trade Blankets Dec. 7-May 28: Henry Ossawa Tanner and the Influence of Paris Jan. 11-April 16: Picasso: After the War, the Final Years May 3-Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun staff | July 10, 2014
With the return of fall will come an upswing in Baltimore's arts activity, and The Sun's arts staff is keen to help our readers find local arts and entertainment events.   The Sun is collecting events information for its Fall Arts Guide, due out in September.   Baltimore arts venues and organizations are invited to submit events from September through December in the categories of classical music, dance, pop music, film, theater, visual arts and eclectic (comedy shows, festivals, lectures, unusual arts events, etc.)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 21, 1995
In terms of visual arts, this year's Artscape is a big letdown.It has too few works by too few artists in too few shows, and the shows themselves are uneven. Among the million or more people expected to swarm Artscape this weekend, those who take the trouble to look at the art will see some fine works. But not enough of them.Last year, there were five organized visual arts shows with more than 100 artists represented. This year, there are four, with about 60 artists. Aside from the second annual car show, there are three other curated shows -- one of paintings, one of outdoor sculpture and one of installations.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | July 23, 1993
Sharon Wyrrick is an artist who works at an imaginary intersection.It's at a point formed by the convergence of dance, theater and the visual arts. All three figure in her "dance theater" works, which are far from conventional dance or theater.She will perform three of her creations -- "Trace," "Infinite Passions" and "Nest" -- tomorrow night at the Kinetics Dance Theatre in the Howard County Center for the Arts. For some, this is a rain check for her scheduled Feb. 21 performance, canceled because of snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 28, 1991
A viewing of five of the seven shows gathered under the umbrella of the Columbia Festival of the Arts' visual arts component leads to the conclusion that those responsible for the festival ought seriously to rethink this component of it. If visual art.Consider: The new element of this festival, a visual arts competition show, had restrictions on allowable art (such as no nudity) that caused the resignation of a juror. The show itself was on the whole wearisomely ultra-conservative and banal, and it ended up in a space where it had to close last weekend, before the festival even opened.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 9, 2005
From silk-screens by Andy Warhol at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art to color-drenched canvases by Monet at the Baltimore Museum of Art - the 2005-2006 season is packed with offerings for all types of art lovers. Among this year's most exciting events surely will be the Walters Art Museum's spectacular Palace of Wonders and its cornucopia of fabulous bling-bling, which goes on view Oct. 22. Paintings, sculpture, porcelains, gemstones, clocks, carpets, watches, swords and knickknacks by the cartload were the means by which aristocrats and mercantile princes of 17th-century Netherlands and Flanders trumpeted their good fortune and virtue.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 29, 2003
Baltimore's annual Artscape festival is surely one of the best things that ever happened to this city. It's an event that binds the ties of community and renews our civic spirit; it's a reflection of who we are and what we can be at our best. Alas, the visual art component of Artscape is still not all that it could be, at least not yet. A couple of years back I wrote a column suggesting that Artscape's organizers ought to rethink how they present the visual arts during the festival. I wrote then: "We have the makings of a potentially world-class visual arts scene" that "should be a destination for museum curators, dealers and collectors of contemporary art from all over the country and around the world.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH | August 11, 2009
A month after the annual Artscape drew record crowds to the streets around Penn Station and MICA, the Inner Harbor Art Festival will make its debut, spread out in two areas: the Power Plant near the National Aquarium and Power Plant Live a couple of blocks north. The free outdoor event will be held Aug. 22 and 23. Announcing the new venture at a news conference Monday morning in front of the Power Plant, Mayor Sheila Dixon described as "phenomenal" the group of 150 artists, regional and national, who will be offering more than $15 million worth of creative work for sale.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
At Annapolis High School, student dancers and actors rehearse in an airy, two-story studio. Visual arts students fire their ceramic creations in a trio of kilns. Graphics students work in a lab filled with new computers with wide, flat-screen monitors. Film and production students fine-tune their creations on a mixing board worthy of a professional recording studio. For a few months now, students at Annapolis High - both those in a performing and visual arts magnet program and other students - have been exploring their creative talents in the school's new two-story addition.
ENTERTAINMENT
b staff | December 18, 2013
MICA graduate Haggag, 26, was named director of the Contemporary Museum this year. Exhibits are listed in reverse chronological order.  Seth Adelsberger, "Surface Treatment," Springsteen Gallery, Nov. 22-Jan. 10, 2014 Springsteen Gallery isn't even a year old and they've already left one hell of a mark on our arts scene. Seth Adelsberger's exhibition is sharp and a wanton change towards process that I very much enjoyed. I am looking forward to his solo exhibition opening June 2014 at the Baltimore Museum of Art and encourage everyone to catch his work at Springsteen while you can. Also, someone please, please, please buy me an Adelsberger for Christmas.  Multiple Artists, "Paint it Black, Guest Spot," Nov. 9-Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Jim Lucio, who succeeded Gary Kachadourian as visual arts coordinator for Artscape in 2009, has resigned. An imaginative artist, Lucio won praise for spicing things up at Artscape, the annual summer event in Baltimore billed as the country's largest free arts festival. In his first year, he instigated interactive projects that involved an interactive video and a giant graphic novel. Since then, he was been credited with keeping the visual arts scene at Artscape invigorating.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
I was glad to see The Sun editorial board express strong support for the Baltimore art scene and the role that organizations like The Contemporary play in the vitality of the city's cultural life ("The Contemporary returns," July 8). Yet it is with some irony that I note the editorial's enthusiastic endorsement "for what a Sun critic once called 'the art of right now.'" The Sun has not had a full-time art critic since 2008. I am an artist and former exhibitions director at Goucher College during the golden age of Baltimore art criticism, when all four shows we put on each season were likely to be reviewed by both The Sun and the City Paper.
NEWS
April 10, 2013
The Sun deserves kudos for having survived the near starvation of its print edition in recent years. But to this long-time print subscriber, the emaciated paper we get today must have determined that survival depended on shedding the staff it once devoted to theater, movies and the visual arts. At the same time, however, it has retained full roster of sports coverage. Encouraging signs of The Sun's improving print effort can be seen in several superb recent investigative articles that stirred local officials to address community problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Artist Mia Wiener embroiders provocative images on white linen because she's fascinated by the intimate nature of textiles and by the way that most people take them for granted. Emily C-D creates collages in her native Baltimore and also in Mexico from materials that other people throw away: discarded newspapers, bottle tops, string, and old pots and pans. And Ashley Minner crafts nearly life-size portraits of Baltimore's Native-American Lumbee community that revel in the beauty and strength of the people with whom she grew up. The women are part of the generation that will determine the form that the visual arts will take here in the future and are being highlighted in "Thirty: 30 Creative Minds Under 30," a group of 10 gallery talks sponsored by Maryland Art Place . The trio have been selected to present their artwork in the debut presentation on Wednesday; the remaining nine events will take place roughly once a month.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
A THREE-PART series concluding yesterday in The Sun documented the flow of precious resources from "general" education in city schools to that hungry and profligate blob, special education.As a result, reading, science and math programs have suffered for years. But one basic program has been particularly neglected, and it badly needs champions. That's Baltimore's education in the arts.The arts' status in city schools is summed up by Mary Ann Mears, an artist who has been active for a long time in promoting dance, visual arts, music and drama in Maryland and Baltimore:"What had been an exemplary program 30 years ago has been eroded through inertia, budgetary problems, changes in philosophy and changes in administration."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
A new exhibit at Howard County Center for the Arts in Ellicott City draws young artists from throughout the county and inspiration from around the world, showcasing student artwork about correspondence and travel. Art teachers used the theme as a starting point with at least one class in every Howard County public school and then chose several pieces for display. The result is a diverse exhibit running through April 26 in the center's Gallery Two. The student works are complemented by pieces by two professional artists: mixed-media projects by Janet Maher and paintings by Molly Springfield.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | August 18, 2012
The Carroll County Arts Council opened its 10th anniversary Members Art Show on Aug. 16. Featuring 156 pieces by 156 artists, the show is always a winner, according to Susan Williamson, visual arts coordinator for the Council. "It's a real strong show," Williamson said. "This year's judges are amazed, for a non-juried show, how good it is. " Members had to be 18 years old to enter. Williamson estimates that at least 75 of the artists have been part of the show since its beginnings.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | July 17, 2012
In one of the most ideal settings in the county for such an exercise, high school students in the Baltimore County Summer Visual Arts Enrichment Camp spent Friday, July 13, working on landscapes at Hampton Mansion in Towson. "It's something new," said Daniel Flinchbaugh, 16. "That's what this program is all about: expanding our experiences. " Flinchbaugh, a Lutherville resident and rising junior at the Carver Center for Arts and Technology, was part of a small group of advanced artists working on landscape painting.
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