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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
About 90 visitors meandered among the buildings of the Carroll County Farm Museum one sunny morning last week. From there, they boarded tour buses that drove them through downtown Westminster while a guide pointed out landmarks and related local lore. The buses headed northwest through rolling hills and farms to Taneytown for a stop at a posh inn housed in a restored antebellum mansion and later a picnic lunch at Taneytown Memorial Park. Then came Carroll Vista, the final stop and the reason for the three-hour odyssey.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
About 90 visitors meandered among the buildings of the Carroll County Farm Museum one sunny morning last week. From there, they boarded tour buses that drove them through downtown Westminster while a guide pointed out landmarks and related local lore. The buses headed northwest through rolling hills and farms to Taneytown for a stop at a posh inn housed in a restored antebellum mansion and later a picnic lunch at Taneytown Memorial Park. Then came Carroll Vista, the final stop and the reason for the 3-hour odyssey.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 29, 2004
Eight years ago this March, Karen and Edward Connelly moved into a brand new, two-story Colonial. The home, a modular design, was built in an established Catonsville neighborhood. Old and established is what they wanted. And a tiny Colonial is what they got. "If you have a small home, you need to be organized," says Karen Connelly. "There needs to be a space for everything." In this 27-foot-wide, 22-foot-deep home, all of her resources as a decorator and painter of murals are put to the test.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
The Baltimore County Revenue Authority yesterday purchased for $2.1 million at a public auction the financially troubled Mount Vista Golf Course in Kingsville. The property is to remain a golf course, said George E. Hale, executive director of the authority. The Mount Vista course is an 18-hole "executive" course -- one that can be played relatively quickly because its fairways are shorter than those on full-length courses -- and it is not near any of the other five courses operated by the revenue authority.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
The Mount Vista Golf Course in Kingsville, troubled by bouts with Baltimore County bureaucracy, legal wrangling and money problems, is being placed on the auction block today. Since 2002, owners of the 111-acre course have been attempting to dig out from under a debt of about $2.5 million owed to Chesapeake Bank of Maryland. Daniel P. Crispino, a co-owner, and Robert Scarlett, a lawyer for the golf course, said last week the owners were attempting to secure a loan to pay their debt with the bank but were unsuccessful.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 12, 2003
THESE GREAT summer mornings give me enough time to fit in a much appreciated daily walk. The sun rises early, chasing out the night's shadows and throwing the city into a favorable light, the kind of tones that photographers and early pacers like. For years, I dutifully trudged up Charles Street and did six or seven loops on the Homewood Field at the Johns Hopkins University. This summer, I decided the going round and round was pretty dull, so I resolved to take in more of old Baltimore.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
A Carney-based bank plans to sell a 102-acre Kingsville golf course at auction next month as a part of foreclosure proceedings filed in the Baltimore County Circuit Court. Chesapeake Bank of Maryland filed a petition yesterday to foreclose on the Mount Vista Golf Course. In court papers, the bank says the owners have failed to make the required payments on $2.2 million in loans made in 1993 and 1996. A lawyer for the bank said the auction is open to the public and is scheduled for 11 a.m. Aug. 9 at the golf course clubhouse in the 1100 block of Raphel Road in Kingsville.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2002
BIG MEADOWS, Va. - John and Stephanie Young have some advice for travelers to Shenandoah National Park: If you want a great view, get a postcard. After battling eight hours in traffic to get here from Middletown, Conn., the Youngs were eager to take in a majestic vista from an overlook in the Blue Ridge Mountains. But as they stared across a hazy expanse, they got nothing of the sort. "We were expecting blue skies," Stephanie grumbled. "We got gray smog." Beyond the perch where the Youngs stood on their recent family vacation lies a panorama that, when the park was created in 1926, was said to offer views of 100 miles all around.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and By Sarah Clayton,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
To step onto the Block Island ferry is to step onto a time machine. In the 45 minutes it takes the ferry to go from Point Judith on the Rhode Island mainland to what the native Narragansett Indians called Manisses (Island of the Little God), time drifts like mist back over a hundred years to the late 19th century, when tourists suddenly began to pour into this 7-by-3-mile strip of land. Until then, it had been a sleepy backwater of farmers and fishermen -- much as it still is today in the winter.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
Everybody's always complaining that you can't find anything in Columbia, what with all the trees and berms meant to cut down on "visual clutter." Well, downtown Columbia has suddenly come into view. About 7 1/2 acres of 80-foot trees that used to camouflage The Mall in Columbia were mowed down in the center of town recently to make way for a luxury townhouse development. Washington Homes, a division of K. Hovnanian Cos., is building 127 three-story townhouses - the last residential project planned for Columbia's Town Center.
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