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By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | January 10, 2008
I intend to purchase a new laptop soon. Several people have recommended that I get Windows XP rather than Vista because Vista still has problems. It will be used for home and business with a lot of use with Word, Excel and PowerPoint. What would you advise? - Dick Spehalski I disagree about sticking with XP. Vista is a safer and better version of Windows. It's sure not perfect, but that's true for XP as well. Vista is memory-hungry. Make sure you get at least 2 gigabytes of RAM and be sure the laptop has a good video card.
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BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | November 29, 2007
Ihave a laptop computer with Windows XP and plan to buy a new desktop computer with Vista. I use the laptop when I travel and then transfer the files to my desktop when I am at home. Will I have any problems using files created or updated under XP and then transferred to the Vista machine, or vice versa? -- P.D. Hughey No one can promise you a completely smooth ride with any operating system. However, I have computers running both Windows XP and Windows Vista at home. I have yet to have the first problem moving data and opening files, no matter which computer created them.
BUSINESS
By David Husted and David Husted,Atlanta Journal-Constitution | August 2, 2007
I have a laptop that I need to get rid of. What is the best way to remove the hard drive or the information? Getting the hard drive out would require surgery that, if done by a home user, might destroy the laptop. But most of us would be reluctant to pay a repair shop $75 to $100 to do it, just so we could safely give away the computer. There are commercial programs that meet government standards for wiping a disk clean (unlike what happens when you reformat a disk or delete files). But most of them cost money.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Atlanta Journal-Constitution | July 12, 2007
I have now read your last two columns on Windows Vista and continue to have a relevant question. What are the benefits of migrating to Vista, other than helping Microsoft make money? As a computer user, what will I gain? I understand Vista has fancier icons. I don't know how I lived without them all these years. - Michael Schmidt, Colorado Springs, Colo. Let's start with a given: You will probably move to Vista sooner or later - no matter whether Vista is a significant upgrade or not. Microsoft will eventually drop XP support, and new programs will be written with Vista in mind.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Atlanta Journal-Constitution | June 21, 2007
I tried to download some updates from Microsoft for Windows XP and received a message that said my Windows XP has been stolen and a counterfeit Windows is now on my computer. I have been having some problems since this happened. Is this a ploy just to sell me a new copy or has someone really stolen my Windows XP? - Jean Pender I don't think anyone stole your Windows. I do think the copy of Windows you have was counterfeit from the beginning. The checking done online is a relatively new system created by Microsoft to detect counterfeit software.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | May 10, 2007
I bought a Gateway laptop in December with a free Vista upgrade. I made sure the laptop was Vista-ready and have received the Vista pack. However, I have been hesitant to install the Vista upgrade because of the previous problems with it, and because I do not know what to expect (problemwise) once installed. The IT people are waiting before installing Vista at work, so they are no help. Would you advise to go ahead and install the upgrade or wait until more improvements are made? - Kay O'Reilly, bellsouth.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | April 19, 2007
My teenager's computer with the Windows XP version of Microsoft Office has died. We purchased a new computer for her and could not find one with Windows XP, so we ended up getting one with Vista. No one seems to know if we can load the Windows XP Office onto her computer or if I have to go out and buy Office 2007 for Vista. - Jackie Hall On the upside, there is no trouble loading earlier versions of Microsoft Office such as Office 2003 on computers running the Vista operating system, which as you note are just about the only ones available in stores anymore.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | March 15, 2007
I am a 68-year-old man still using my old PC. Most of the time when I search something or write an e-mail, I get a long message saying, "The page cannot be displayed," followed by a lot of paragraphs about different things. Is it because my PC is old? It has Windows ME. I bought it in 2001. I only use this for e-mail and searching the Internet. My son told me to buy a new one. I am a retiree on a limited budget. Can you suggest which kind of computer is good for me -- a laptop or desktop?
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2007
I am quite old and computer-ignorant. I need a new computer, as mine is about six years old and on its last legs. I took your suggestion and waited for Windows Vista, and I intend to get a new Dell with all the power I can get. What worries me is whether Vista will let me use programs that I used constantly over the years, such as Adobe Photoshop 2.0, which let me create and edit and print anything that came to mind. Photo montages, artistic creations - anything was possible. Will my old programs work in a new Vista system computer?
BUSINESS
By San Jose Mercury News | February 8, 2007
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Microsoft's Windows Vista may be getting all the buzz, but it's not the only operating system update that will hit store shelves this year. This spring, Apple Inc. plans to release Leopard, the fifth revision of its rival Mac OS X software. As with previous updates, Leopard will add new features to the operating system, most notably a backup program called Time Machine, which puts a 3-D interface on the process of searching through archived files. The new features could prove important for Apple.
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