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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | March 29, 1992
The opening of Oriole Park at Camden Yards presents new collecting opportunities.The Orioles will supply some of them on Opening Day.According to David Cope, the Orioles marketing and advertising director, all April 6 fans will receive an "Opening Day celebration kit," which features a limited-edition Upper Deck commemorative sheet, a special mini-pennant and a can of Coke Classic emblazoned with a picture of the new stadium. The special Coke cans will be available in stores the next day.The Opening Day program will be unique because the cover will change for the second game, "reflecting Opening Day, if we can carry it off," said the Orioles' Bob Brown.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 13, 2013
While looking for a job earlier this year, Shareki Chaney, 26, kept busy by volunteering at her son's public charter school. Now Chaney has a new job as a Volunteer in Service to America. She is one of 17 AmeriCorps VISTAs who are newly assigned to community groups, schools, nonprofits and government agencies throughout Baltimore. Technically, VISTAs aren't volunteers, because they get a stipend of $13,300 for 12 months, or 105 percent of the poverty level in Baltimore. The pay isn't much, but for Chaney, it's all good.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 15, 2007
I am quite old and computer-ignorant. I need a new computer, as mine is about six years old and on its last legs. I took your suggestion and waited for Windows Vista, and I intend to get a new Dell with all the power I can get. What worries me is whether Vista will let me use programs that I used constantly over the years, such as Adobe Photoshop 2.0, which let me create and edit and print anything that came to mind. Photo montages, artistic creations - anything was possible. Will my old programs work in a new Vista system computer?
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | November 9, 2006
Normally, I don't start writing about holiday PC buying until we toss out the last Thanksgiving leftovers. But this is the strangest computer shopping season I can recall. The reason: Virtually every PC on store shelves through the holidays will be a leftover. There's nothing wrong with leftovers from the table; some stews and soups are actually better the second time around. But we're talking about computers here, so the comparison is a bit more complicated. Why is this a season of leftovers?
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | May 10, 2007
I bought a Gateway laptop in December with a free Vista upgrade. I made sure the laptop was Vista-ready and have received the Vista pack. However, I have been hesitant to install the Vista upgrade because of the previous problems with it, and because I do not know what to expect (problemwise) once installed. The IT people are waiting before installing Vista at work, so they are no help. Would you advise to go ahead and install the upgrade or wait until more improvements are made? - Kay O'Reilly, bellsouth.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | February 1, 2007
Microsoft's release of Vista, the latest and greatest version of the Windows operating system, captured the big headlines. But Vista obscured this week's real technology news - a new technique for making microprocessors that will have far more impact on our lives in the long run. To get your head around this, you have to learn to love the word "nano" - a Greco-technical term that means one-billionth of something. A nanometer is a billionth of a meter, which is - well, really small. So tiny that the word "nanotechnology" refers to the science of building electronic circuits or mechanical devices at the molecular or atomic level.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
President Clinton's national service czar came to West Baltimore yesterday to inspect his troops: 15 newly minted members of VISTA, the "domestic Peace Corps."Unlike the Volunteers in Service to America of old, who were often sent into cities direct from college campuses, all 15 already live in the neighborhood they will serve -- Sandtown-Winchester, a poor community where the Enterprise Foundation and the city have embarked on an ambitious "neighborhood transformation" program.Anthony Stone, 27, heard about Volunteers in Service to America while studying for the high school diploma he had never gotten.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | October 9, 1991
For nursing home residents who cannot get to the library, Library Link volunteers bring the world within their reach."Our eyes may become dim and our muscles may become weak, but we can soar through space to places we've never visited with books," said County Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy at the program's 20th birthday celebration last month.Since 1971, Library Link has provided books and games to nursing home residents. Currently, 15 volunteers visit 102 residents in sevencounty nursing homes once every other week.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 12, 2003
THESE GREAT summer mornings give me enough time to fit in a much appreciated daily walk. The sun rises early, chasing out the night's shadows and throwing the city into a favorable light, the kind of tones that photographers and early pacers like. For years, I dutifully trudged up Charles Street and did six or seven loops on the Homewood Field at the Johns Hopkins University. This summer, I decided the going round and round was pretty dull, so I resolved to take in more of old Baltimore.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1994
When the Maryland Stadium Authority and the Orioles first decided to build a ballpark on a constricted site near downtown Baltimore, there seemed to be 99 ways to do it wrong and one way to do it right.But the stadium authority and its architects found the right way to do it -- and they've been drawing accolades ever since.Last week Oriole Park at Camden Yards received an Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects -- one of the top prizes for design."The architects and their enlightened clients have built not merely another ballpark but a very important public place, bringing people into contact with each other and with the city itself," said the AIA's jury.
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