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NEWS
July 19, 2002
IF YOU HAVEN'T seen the U.S. Capitol for awhile, a trip there now will be quite a shock. The view from the east side, where the Supreme Court sits, has been almost completely obscured. Wooden barriers hide earth-movers digging a hole three-fourths the size of the Capitol itself. The ostensible purpose of this massive, three-year construction project, which could cost taxpayers as much as $1 billion, is to create a visitors center that will make a tour of the Capitol "more accessible, comfortable, secure and informative for all."
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
On a low-humidity puffy-cloud summer day, 8-year-old Zach Green of Gaithersburg rode a bicycle along the 5-mile Wildlife Drive in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge with his mother, Becky Green, and his grandmother, Andrea Adler, who lives in Bethesda. The three stopped at the first observation site along the drive, propped their bikes on kickstands and began walking up a short boardwalk to the spot where two sets of binoculars were available for searching the marshy grasses and slow-moving Blackwater River.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
When Baltimore's tourism ambassadors announced plans last week to create a new visitors information center near the Inner RTC Harbor, they did so with a sense of urgency.Since early 1990, the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association has run a 2,000-square-foot visitors center on the first floor of the Marsh & McLennan Building at Pratt and Howard streets. But the lease there will expire late next year, and the city has no replacement lined up.The convention association has been allowed to rent space in the Marsh & McLennan building for $1 a year under a five-year agreement with Stone & Associates, the local firm selected by the city in the 1980s to recycle the cast-iron-fronted building.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
'The Best of the Chesapeake' The seventh annual exhibition of paintings and sculptures by more than 20 marine and landscape artists is on display through Sunday, Oct. 5, at McBride Gallery, 215 Main St. in Annapolis. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and noon to 5:30 p.m. Sundays. Information: 410-267-7077 or mcbridegallery.com. 'Earth Matters' A mixed-media exhibit by Fran Skiles is on view through Friday, Sept. 26, at the Adkins Arboretum's Visitors Center, 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
More tourists and day-trippers flocking to Annapolis could park their cars and walk to the harbor under a proposal to open a visitors center in a historic house next to the Gotts Court &L Garage.In a move that could ease downtown traffic congestion, a committee has targeted a Colonial-era house in the first block of West Street for the visitors center. The house backs onto the 540-space garage under construction behind the Arundel Center.The chalk brick house, leased until recently by Gaines McHale Antiques Ltd., is ideally suited because it is within steps of Church Circle, said Charles Lamb, a retired architect and co-chairman of the city's Visitors Center Committee.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | June 26, 1994
A planned visitors center on Otter Point Creek in Edgewood has gotten a go-ahead from federal officials, who have earmarked $600,000 to build it."It's a tremendous asset, environmentally, for Harford County," said Bob Staab, director of the county Department of Recreation and Parks. "It's important for people's knowledge."The center will be used to educate Harford and upper Chesapeake Bay residents about the bay and its estuaries, said Dr. Torrey C. Brown, secretary of the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
We have PSINet Stadium. Could we handle a PSINet Constellation Pier on the Inner Harbor?The Constellation Foundation has enlisted the Baltimore Ravens' sales and marketing team to help find a corporate sponsor to donate $1 million to the old warship in exchange for the right to bolt its name to the ship's Visitors Center on Pier 1."We believe this naming opportunity offers significant marketing value," said foundation Chairwoman Gail Shawe. "The recent Ravens deal with PSINet demonstrates their expertise and we are confident they will be equally successful on behalf of the Constellation Foundation."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Last year, 3,500 people passed through the Baltimore Area Visitors Center during January and February. This year, that many stopped in during the three-day weekend that ended Monday.The difference is partly a result of the visitors center's new location: the two-story Constellation building on the Inner Harbor promenade, just south of the Pratt Street pavilion of Harborplace.With the warship Constellation closed for repairs, the Constellation Foundation allowed the visitors center to move into the first-floor space previously occupied by the ship's gift shop and orientation gallery.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
The Board of Estimates approved yesterday the awarding of a $3.5 million contract for the long-delayed Baltimore Visitors Center, clearing the way to break ground on the project this month. "The greatest beneficiaries of the visitors center will be the attractions outside the Inner Harbor," said Andrew B. Frank, executive vice president of Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development agency. "Imagine the potential for 15 million people to be exposed to the latest exhibit at the Walters or the expansion planned for the Great Blacks in Wax [Museum]
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- At one point, it sounded like a good idea -- an underground visitors center designed to make the Capitol more hospitable to the hordes of tourists tramping through each year.But its price tag -- $71 million -- is causing indigestion among many lawmakers, wary of triggering a new wave of public fury targeted at Congress and its supposedly high-living ways."I don't hear any of my constituents demanding a new visitors center," said Representative Dan Glickman, D-Kan., author of a Nov. 1 letter signed by 49 of his colleagues opposing the new facility.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Sunday, Aug. 31 Patriotic concert The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra will celebrate the 200th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner," at its Lexus Pops in the Park concert at 5:30 p.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 600 Quiet Waters Park Road in Annapolis. Joining director Jose-Luis Novo and the orchestra to sing the national anthem is tenor Rolando Sanz. The concert serves as a prelude to the orchestra's 2014-2015 season with works by Sibelius, Shostakovich, Liszt, Duke Ellington and John Philip Sousa.
NEWS
April 13, 2014
Those supporting Columbia Association Directors' secret giveaway of a hunk of Symphony Woods for a private group's folly disregard the intent of the visionary they invoke.  Last week, a former board member claimed here that James Rouse would love what looms ahead for the tract. Actually, early on Mr. Rouse decreed that 22 percent of Columbia's acreage would forever be set aside as Open Space.  For years this pledge echoed at the Visitors Center in the orientation film that he helped craft. It highlighted the solitude of Symphony Woods as the new town's elegant centerpiece.  Rouse's formula focused on making Columbia comfortable for residents and workers, not burdening them with excessive tourist traffic destined to a gimmicky exhibit wiping out many trees and natural ambiance.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 5, 2014
How can Baltimoreans "strive for environmental justice for all citizens, particularly in the face of climate change?" That's one of the central questions to be tackled Thursday evening at a forum put on by the Friends of Maryland's Olmsted Parks & Landscapes .  A panel of three speakers will address "the Olmsted Challenge: Fostering Environmental Justice for a More Humane City. " Scheduled speakers are: Scot Spencer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation; Kristin Baja of the city's Office of Sustainability and Morgan Grove, a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Join a naturalist on a Tree Walk, Sunday, Aug. 4 from 10 to 11 a.m. at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop, located off Powder Mill Road between the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Route 197. All ages can discover how to identify local trees by leaf, bark and flower in this informative half-mile hike. Registration is required. Call 301-497-5887 for reservation. Donations to the Friends of Patuxent are appreciated.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Anne Arundel County, including Annapolis, led the state in tourism dollars in 2011, according to a report by the travel research company Tourism Economics, the local visitors bureau said this week. The Annapolis & Anne Arundel County Conference and Visitors Bureau said that according to the report, nearly 5.6 million visitors to Annapolis and the county spent nearly $3.2 billion, a 7.2 percent increase over the $3 billion generated in 2010. The sum represents transportation, food, hotel and other spending.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration unveiled yesterday a $300 million proposal for renovating the White House and its grounds, including an expanded visitors center, a mammoth underground parking garage and private recreation space for presidents and their families.The plan, which would take 20 years to complete, was described by National Park Service officials as a much-needed improvement for an architectural treasure that has been badly neglected.It would be the first comprehensive renovation of the site since George Washington chose the spot for the presidential residence in 1791.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
No more indecision. No more trailers. Baltimore has settled on a site for a permanent visitors center, and the glassy pavilion should open its doors to the Inner Harbor for the 2003 tourist season. Architects at Design Collective Inc. outlined to a city design panel yesterday their vision for a center on the grassy knoll just south of Harborplace's Light Street Pavilion. Eventually, the city will redo the entire stretch on the west bank of the harbor as a park. The see-through, boxlike center will invite tourists inside to collect information on the Inner Harbor and other Baltimore attractions.
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