Advertisement
HomeCollectionsVisiting Teams
IN THE NEWS

Visiting Teams

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Jerry Richardson, lead investor in the Charlotte, N.C., expansion bid, said modifications made last week in the city's payout to visiting teams contributed heavily to the Carolina Panthers' victory last night.The 28 NFL owners voted unanimously to give Charlotte one of two expansion franchises.NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue had said the league would expand by two, but Charlotte was the only city that received a complete endorsement from the seven-member expansion committee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Washington Nationals star pitcher Stephen Strasburg seemed a bit sad about vocal Orioles fans during the Nationals' 8-2, 11-inning loss in Washington last night. "Well, maybe someday it'll be different,” Strasburg, who fanned nine in seven innings but was victimized by a Nelson Cruz home run, said in a video posted by MASN. “But obviously that franchise has been a lot longer than we have. Can't really worry about it too much. Hopefully, our fans travel well after tomorrow. " It's a pretty diplomatic answer from a player who never says much, but his face in the video tells the story.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | October 23, 1993
NFL backers in Charlotte, N.C., facing lingering questions about their financial plan, have revised it again and now boast that they will be able to pay visiting teams more in gate receipts than any other city in the running for an expansion team.In the third change in the city's financial plan in the past month, Charlotte's NFL investment group notified the league Thursday that it no longer will request a temporary exemption from the league's traditional ticket-sharing split."The partners want to do everything possible," said Max Muhleman, a consultant working on behalf of the city's bid.The NFL is expected to award two expansion franchises at a meeting Tuesday in Chicago.
SPORTS
By Paul D. Bowker and Paul D. Bowker,Special to The Sun | February 10, 2008
ORLANDO, Fla. -- A season-high sixth consecutive victory did not come easily for the Blast last night. Machel Millwood and Mike Lookingland each had a goal and assist in the Blast's 12-4 win over the Orlando Sharks, but the worst defensive team in the Major Indoor Soccer League had a few surprises for the hottest team in the league. "We didn't expect this club to give us an easy game. ... They were taking it to us," Blast coach Danny Kelly said. A week ago, the Blast (12-7) scored 25 consecutive points in a 25-13 win over Orlando.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | September 23, 1993
CHICAGO -- If the financial and organizational stability of Baltimore's NFL bid is an advantage in the race for a team, the city got a lot of help from its competitors the past two days.Virtually every other city making presentations before the league owners' expansion and finance committees was introducing new investors or explaining recent problems or setbacks.St. Louis unveiled a new investor -- reportedly Pittsburgh-area businessman John E. Connelly -- and answered some pointed questions about how the deal would work with the recent loss of lead investor James Busch Orthwein.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Washington Nationals star pitcher Stephen Strasburg seemed a bit sad about vocal Orioles fans during the Nationals' 8-2, 11-inning loss in Washington last night. "Well, maybe someday it'll be different,” Strasburg, who fanned nine in seven innings but was victimized by a Nelson Cruz home run, said in a video posted by MASN. “But obviously that franchise has been a lot longer than we have. Can't really worry about it too much. Hopefully, our fans travel well after tomorrow. " It's a pretty diplomatic answer from a player who never says much, but his face in the video tells the story.
NEWS
September 7, 1993
So the Baltimore football boosters sold out the premium spots in the not-yet-constructed stadium. Big deal. There was never any question local businesses and football fans would grab those sky boxes and club seats. The local group had to do it because rival Charlotte, without financing for a stadium, was grasping at straws to prove its proposal viable. If we were the National Football League owners, we would be more impressed by a couple of other things -- or perhaps three.Most recent was the furor here over the name of the team we don't have yet. How much more evidence does the NFL need that this metropolitan area is overrun with sports fanatics, who can even get charged up over a team's name?
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | June 18, 1993
For all its complexities, the NFL expansion race boils down to one simple truth: If Baltimore doesn't get a team, the fix is in.In fact, Baltimore might offer the strongest financial package of any competing city, provided it sells 100 luxury boxes and 7,500 club seats between July 1 and Sept. 3, the window mandated by the NFL.That's not hometown boosterism. That's Logic 101.In theory, a publicly financed stadium, a choice of two strong ownership groups and a $1 million guarantee for visiting teams ++ should be enough to seal this thing.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
The playoff formula used to be this: win all or most of your home games and split on the road. It was the most logical path to the postseason. Not anymore. Now, some of the NFL's best teams are winning more consistently on the road than at home. The Philadelphia Eagles are 5-0 on the road and 2-4 at Veterans Stadium. The New York Jets are 5-0 as road warriors and 2-3 at the Meadowlands. Both teams are in the driver's seat in their respective divisions. The St. Louis Rams are a modest 3-2 in their dome home, but an immaculate 5-0 as visitors.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer Staff writers Ken Murray, John Steadman, Vito Stellino and David Michael Ettlin contributed to this article | October 27, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Baltimore's long wait for an NFL expansion franchise just got a little longer.Owners of the 28 teams voted last night to give one of the hotly sought-after franchises to Charlotte, N.C., and to delay the naming of the other team until Nov. 30.After daylong meetings that concluded at about 9 p.m., NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue announced Charlotte's victory and said the owners were unable to come to a consensus on a pick among the four...
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2007
SEATTLE -- When he was studying videotape of his struggles recently, Orioles closer Chris Ray's attention was grabbed, not by something he was doing, but rather by a tendency of the hitters he was facing. "I was just looking at it and guys were taking huge cuts on the first pitch," he said. "They were just waiting and expecting the fastball." That led Ray to conclude he needed to do a much better job of mixing up his pitches, especially early in counts. The 25-year-old credits his ability to do that for his recent string of effective outings.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2007
North Carolina freshman Brandan Wright looked like he'd just as soon face a firing squad. The referee had handed him the ball, and Wright had a chance to pull the Tar Heels even with two made free throws. But before him, a wall of color and sound sloped up behind the basket. Every student at Maryland's Comcast Center seemed to be roaring. Some signs encouraged Wright to "Miss It" or "Brick!" his shot. And then there were the swirlies, those brightly hued vortexes out of some psychedelic nightmare.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
From the December 1967 Ice Bowl in Green Bay to the January 2002 tuck rule game in New England, the NFL's postseason is filled with jarring examples of home-field conditions that proved decisive. The Packers put the Dallas Cowboys on ice in the 1967 NFL championship game to demonstrate how valuable home-field advantage can be. Thirty-four years later, the Patriots launched their dynasty years and reinforced that idea with an overtime win against the Oakland Raiders in a Foxborough snowstorm.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Stalled in their attempt to reach a new labor agreement, NFL owners yesterday tackled the growing disparity in shared revenues and came away with nothing more than a long-range plan. There was no compromise on a new formula to distribute more of the league's wealth, but there was a mandate from commissioner Paul Tagliabue. The 32 owners will meet once a month for the next five months with the goal of finding a compromise and an extension of the collective bargaining agreement by October.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2004
With at least seven teams vying for the attention of free-agent pitcher Carl Pavano, the Orioles have secured a Dec. 6 visit with the right-hander and his representative at Camden Yards. Pavano and agent Scott Shapiro are expected to spend two nights in Baltimore before heading West in conjunction with baseball's winter meetings in Anaheim, Calif., from Dec. 10-13. Pavano already has visited Boston, where he dined with pitcher Curt Schilling, and he'll make stops in Detroit and New York (to meet with the Yankees)
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
The Ravens provided an answer to their inexperienced receiving corps and removed a major question mark surrounding a franchise quarterback. Hours after Marshall quarterback Byron Leftwich solidified his draft standing by passing the team's physical yesterday, the Ravens announced they reached an agreement in principle with receiver Frank Sanders. Slated to be the team's No. 2 wide-out, he is expected to sign a four-year contract, believed to be worth about $7 million, by the end of the week.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | December 30, 1994
Forgive the sentimentality but every man, from cradle to the grave, has an inalienable right to resist the prospect of change, either by stomping his foot, walking a picket line or going on a hunger strike. So it is with the anticipated defection of the Los Angeles Rams to St. Louis.It's an immense setback for the National Football League as tradition, once again, is thrown for a serious loss.The Rams used to be the most glamorous team in pro football history. They had something none of the others had -- a first-rate organization and an owner, the late Dan Reeves, a man of immense vision and undeniable integrity who realized the future of the NFL would best be served by locating a franchise in California.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | November 7, 1993
When the Indianapolis Colts, leading the New England Patriots 9-6, intercepted a pass last Sunday with 1:55 left, they did the logical thing.They had Jeff George kneel down to ice the victory because the Patriots were out of timeouts.It wasn't logical to Colts fans. A cascade of boos rained down from the Hoosier Dome. Fans often boo when teams kneel down at the end of the half, but at the end of the game? Booing a victory?"It [ticked] me off," said Sam Clancy of the Colts. "I know we didn't score 10 touchdowns, but we got a W and we needed it."
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
The Ravens will take a dip into the free-agent waters with a visit from cornerback Corey Fuller today before making their much-anticipated plunge for wide receiver David Boston. Team officials have scheduled their first meeting of the free-agency period with Fuller, an eight-year starter with the Minnesota Vikings and Cleveland Browns, and are trying to finalize plans to bring in Boston this week. Boston, 24, yesterday visited the San Diego Chargers, who might be the Ravens' chief competition for him. The only elite receiver on the market, Boston also reportedly is being pursued by the Atlanta Falcons and would have a longer list of suitors if he didn't carry so much baggage.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2003
The Ravens have no visits scheduled for the first weekend of free agency, but they could have a marquee meeting next week. After the Ravens had preliminary talks with the agent for receiver David Boston yesterday, there is a possibility that Boston soon could be dropping by the team's Owings Mills practice complex, a league source said. Considered one of the top free agents available, Boston would immediately become the Ravens' long sought-after No. 1 receiver. During his four-year career, he has averaged 60 catches and 15.5 yards a reception.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.