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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
The triumphal 200th anniversary voyage under its own sails several weeks ago in Massachusetts Bay of the USS Constitution, affectionately known as "Old Ironsides," recalled the ship's equally popular visit to Baltimore in October 1931.Baltimoreans learned in August that the famed vessel, which had first captured the new nation's interest in 1812 after it defeated the British Guerriere off Nova Scotia, and which had remained undefeated in 41 subsequent engagements, would visit their city.Between 1927 and 1931, the ship had undergone a restoration, much of it made possible by the nickels and pennies collected by children nationwide, at the Charlestown (Mass.
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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Federal education and justice officials unveiled during a visit to Baltimore on Wednesday the first set of national school discipline guidelines to reduce out-of-school suspensions and address the disproportionate suspension rates of students of color and those with disabilities. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Attorney General Eric Holder jointly announced the comprehensive package of guidelines at Frederick Douglass High School, the first time the federal government has issued guidance on school discipline.
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NEWS
September 27, 1994
An article Saturday incorrectly characterized the financial relationship between Catholic Relief Services and sculptor Timothy Blum and his associates, who were to have built a 33-foot cross for Pope John Paul II's visit to Baltimore. In fact, CRS and Mr. Blum have not yet reached an agreement.The Sun regrets the error.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 9, 2012
The Baltimore area has been playing host this week to an unusual visitor from up north - a harp seal.  Oran Warner said it was spotted around noon Tuesday sunning itself on the end of his dock in Edgemere. When he first spotted it, Warner said, "we thought it was a some kind of log or something.  We walked down closer and (said), 'Wait a minute - is that a seal?'  We got closer, and sure enough it was a seal. " Warner, 26, texted his cousin, Kristine Weber, who came over and took photographs of the seal, seen above.
NEWS
October 11, 1995
In publishing a correction in yesterday's editions, The Sun mistakenly reported the name of a group that appeared at Oriole Park at Camden Yards during Pope John Paul II's visit to Baltimore. The group's name is Children Around the World Sign Language Group.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
October 9, 1995
This special early edition of Monday's newspaper provides coverage of the first few hours of Pope John Paul II's historic visit to Baltimore, plus a review of his four days in New York and New Jersey. It contains new stories and photographs as well as material that has already appeared in previous editions of The Sun.The Sun's special coverage of the papal visit continues in Monday morning's regular editions, which will have another 12 pages of fresh articles photographs, editorials and commentary on the pope's day in Baltimore.
FEATURES
April 17, 1991
Last time Queen Elizabeth II came to Maryland, she watched a Terps football game and visited a Giant supermarket.This time, her May 15 visit will include an Orioles game. But what else should she do while in Charm City?Tell us where you'd take the queen during her visit to Baltimore -- and why. We'll publish an itinerary based on your suggestions in early May.To call Sundial, dial 783-1800 (or 268-7736 from Anne Arundel County) using a touch-tone phone. Enter code 4400. The call is a local call from the Baltimore area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | April 11, 1996
Architect Frank Lloyd Wright came to Baltimore in 1932 to visit the Garretts of Evergreen, after which he wrote to Mrs. Garrett of his "charming visit to beautiful Evergreen." So it's appropriate that a traveling show of the great man's designs, titled "A Lasting Vision: The Legacy of Frank Lloyd Wright," should stay at Evergreen during its brief, weeklong visit to Baltimore that begins tomorrow.The show consists of Wright architectural and design works executed after his 1959 death, and includes, among other things, a silver tea service from Tiffany, custom fabrics from Schumacher and wood and steel chairs by Cassina.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has defended the level of state spending on the pope's October visit to Baltimore against charges by a national watchdog group that it violates First Amendment guarantees of religious freedom.In an exchange of letters with Barry W. Lynn, executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, Mr. Glendening said, "As with any major event, the state has an obligation to provide for the public safety and convenience of visitors. It is also important that we acknowledge and maximize the tourism potential of this event."
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | September 26, 1995
Describing in the New York Times his recent visit to Baltimore, travel writer John Ash noted: ''We also pass close to the former home of Wallis Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor, whom Baltimoreans regard with undisguised affection. The thought of a Baltimore girl who not only netted a king, but also got him to give up his throne for her, and became a duchess in the bargain, still makes them glow with civic pride.''In truth, there hasn't been anybody in Baltimore glowing with civic pride about the Duchess of Windsor in 50 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
At age 82, Bennard B. Perlman, the noted Baltimore artist, critic, author, professor and lecturer, is as busy as ever and shows no sign of slowing down. The other day he called to say he was looking forward to the BMA's "Andy Warhol: The Last Decade" exhibition, which opens Oct. 17 . The forthcoming exhibition has special significance for Perlman, who was a close friend of Warhol's when the two were painting and design classmates from 1945 to 1949 at Carnegie Tech, now Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
January 29, 2010
On way back to Washington Updated 1:39 p.m. President Obama, having taken questions from Republicans for 30 minutes longer than scheduled, is now on his way to Washington. First a quick motorcade to Fort McHenry (more blocked traffic), and then a chopper ride back to the White House. Check baltimoresun.com and tomorrow's print edition for full details of the president's visit. By Paul West Obama: Both parties to blame for 'sour climate' Updated 1:34 p.m. President Barack Obama is getting an earful from House Republicans who say that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has shut them out of the decison-making process.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 18, 2009
Mayor Sheila Dixon, in her first extended television interview since she was indicted in January, told WJZ that she was "floored" by the accusation that she stole gift cards from needy families and "bothered" that Barack Obama snubbed her during a pre-inaugural visit to Baltimore. Reporter Adam May said the interview was granted without ground rules, though Dixon told the station that she would not answer specific questions about the 12-count indictment filed against her after a nearly three-year investigation of City Hall corruption by the state prosecutor's office.
NEWS
January 21, 2009
Effort to punish Carter was an abuse of power Thank you for the article "Two dodge House shuffle to stay on judiciary panel" (Jan. 17). State House Speaker Michael E. Busch's effort to punish Del. Jill P. Carter for being outspoken and well-informed was an abuse of power. Thankfully, many in Baltimore responded with phone calls to the speaker and he backed down. But Mr. Busch was trying to punish Ms. Carter for speaking up for the people and the Constitution. When Martin O'Malley was running for governor, she highlighted the arrests without charges of tens of thousands of Baltimore youths during his years as mayor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | June 1, 2008
St. Francis Xavier, one of the founders with Ignatius Loyola of the Society of Jesus in 1534, journeyed to India and later the Far East, where he helped establish the mission of the Roman Catholic Church. Known as "The Apostle of the Indies," Xavier wrote of his conquest for converts, "Give me souls. These people are the delight of my soul." While attempting to enter China, Xavier was stricken with a fever and died on the island of Sancian Dec. 3, 1552. After several months, his body was exhumed and found to be "incorrupt."
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun reporter | September 16, 2006
It's only 9:20 p.m., and already someone is passed out on one of the beds at the Den, a new Charles Village bar. Upon closer inspection, the person appears to be a waitress. She's sprawled in the posture of utter exhaustion: flat on her stomach, legs splayed, one arm tossed theatrically across the mounded pillows. People walk by, but she doesn't move. On the other side of the dimly lit, microsuede-swaddled room, bartender Eric VandeLinde regards his collapsed server with sympathy. Happy hour was busy, and the present lull won't last.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's visit to Baltimore this week on his first Maryland swing of the 2006 campaign season is just one piece of a broader push to make Republican inroads in traditionally Democratic strongholds across the country, analysts and party strategists say. Building a lasting Republican majority has long been a goal of Bush and his top advisers, including Karl Rove and Baltimore-born national party chairman Ken Mehlman. Bush's visit tomorrow underscores the state's importance as one of the places where he is determined to see his party compete, starting with next year's elections.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
With a bling-bedecked NBA star at his side, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. charged yesterday into the home turf of his likely rival in the next gubernatorial race to announce a media campaign that condemns the drugs and violence plaguing Baltimore's streets. Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony, who grew up in Baltimore, was with the governor to make amends for appearing in Stop Snitching, a documentary featuring gun-toting drug dealers who urge people not to cooperate with police. He said he had no idea that footage of him "chillin'" with friends would end up on such a DVD. But Anthony, 20, may have become an unwitting player once again - this time in a heated political contest between Ehrlich and Mayor Martin O'Malley.
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