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By Sloane Brown | November 26, 2000
You walk into the American Visionary Art Museum's sculpture barn to see a large blue cloud (actually performance artist Al Zaruba covered in shards of blue grocery bags) spinning and dipping. A singer warbles as she plays an autoharp. Then you notice almost all the guests are women -- some in sweats, some in jammies -- everyone wearing pearly tiaras. Welcome to AVAM's fourth annual Great Goddess Sleepover. The night included speeches by feminist author Betty Friedan and photographers Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher; various seminars and workshops on such topics as feng shui, tai chi and aromatherapy; as well as massages and psychic readings.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | April 1, 2014
Your Bank of America credit card will get you free admission this weekend to the  American Visionary Art Museum. It's part of the bank's Museums on Us program, which offers free weekend access to a range of museums on the first full weekend of each month this year. Both Bank of America and Merrill Lynch credit and debit cardholders can get in free at the downtown museum on Key Highway on Saturday and Sunday. The program now has a mobile site that gives a full list of all 150 museums in the program.
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FEATURES
By Sylvia H. Badger and Sylvia H. Badger,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
After a decade of hard work, not even Saturday night's windy, rainy, snowy weather could dampen the spirits of Rebecca Hoffberger, the founder of the American Visionary Art Museum.More than 600 people braved the elements to be among the first to see her $7 million dream at 800 Key Highway. The party was a gala fund-raiser that attracted well-heeled guests who paid $250 for dinner at Southern High School followed by a preview, and others, who paid $500 to $1,000 for a VIP preview before dinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Mr. Rain's Fun House, the top-floor restaurant at the American Visionary Art Museum is the answer to the question, What is Baltimore's most shamefully overlooked restaurant. The review goes into a few of the reasons why this is so -- the name isn't doing anyone any favors, I think. And the location all but makes walk-in business non-existent. It's worth getting to know. Here's the review of Mr. Rain's Fun House .
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
Construction engineer Joe Wall is a vision in saw blades. Wall, 38, of Laurel, designed his own brassiere - or "manssiere" after the term popularized by Seinfeld - from two 7.5-inch round blades, which he displays proudly over his overalls. The blades are adorned with battery-powered red and blue jewelry. The pieces are shaped like stars and, when they light up, the overall effect is one of tasteful patriotism. "I haven't got this thing motorized yet," Wall says, "but I'm working on it. I thought it would look cool if they rotated.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
WHEN BALTIMORE'S American Visionary Art Museum first opened in November 1995, it was the nation's first permanent exhibit venue devoted exclusively to ''outsider'' art. People have flocked to view works by self-taught artists, making the Visionary Art Museum a popular Inner Harbor destination.The privately operated museum along Key Highway now faces a new challenge. It has won exclusive negotiating rights from the Baltimore Development Corp. to redevelop an abandoned five-story whiskey-barrel warehouse next door.
NEWS
May 31, 1997
WHEN THE American Visionary Art Museum opened near Federal Hill 18 months ago, "outsider" art by self-taught artists was still a little-known concept.Since then, the visibility and popularity of this genre has fairly exploded. So much so that the privately operated Baltimore museum now has to struggle to keep on the cutting edge of artistic expression.That it does in "The End is Near: Visions of Apocalypse, Millennium and Utopia," which opens today and explores human fascination with the end times.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
Janis Walsh gazed at the painted screens gracing a recreated Baltimore rowhouse, inspiration for her own amateur painting. Leigh and Jessica Swistock, ages 8 and 6, giggled at the sometimes-silly wooden figures with movable parts - contraptions including a skiing dog, a pink police officer and a man devouring spaghetti out of a bathtub. And Phillip Payne stood fixated on the fantastical airplane that his uncle, the late Leslie "Airplane" Payne, made. They were among a group of 89 people who got the first glimpses into the American Visionary Art Museum's sparkling new Jim Rouse Visionary Center, a three-story former whiskey barrel warehouse that flung open its doors to the public yesterday.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1999
Sometimes, it pays to live -- and parade -- in Charles Village.Because of the generosity of Philadelphia photographer Neil Benson and his fellow "Dumpster Divers," the American Visionary Art Museum is offering free admission tomorrow through Sunday to Charles Villagers and others in North Baltimore's 21218 ZIP code.The relationship between the City of Brotherly Love, Charm City, and the museum was launched in the spring when Benson and his team of recyclers -- the Dumpster Divers -- came to Baltimore to enter the first East Coast kinetic sculpture race, which involves creative vehicles that can move on land and float on water.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 30, 1998
If the thought of one more chain steakhouse opening up in Baltimore makes you want to take your bottle of balsamic vinegar and move to another state, run - don't walk - to the Joy America Cafe in the American Visionary Art Museum. Its strange but poetic menu is an antidote for every ordinary restaurant meal you've ever paid too much money for.After Joy America's original chef and owner, Peter Zimmer, left and went back to Santa Fe, N.M., the cafe made some changes for the better. At lunchtime there are now at least a couple ofitems that cost under $10. The staff will try to get you in and out in under an hour (unless you want to linger)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Five years ago, Shawn Theron was waiting tables and managing the bar of the Joy America Cafe inside the American Visionary Art Museum . Today, his work is hanging on the gallery walls. He says it's all because his beloved grandmother — who raised the boy and whom he nicknamed "Red" — urged him from her deathbed to "turn on the light. " "She said it many times," says the 38-year-old artist: "'Turn on the light. Turn on the light.' And it had nothing to do with switches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
When Scott Weaver's alcoholic father walked away from his family to live on the streets, the then-9-year-old boy found solace in working on an assignment for his fourth-grade class to a create a sculpture from toothpicks. Forty-two years later, Weaver is still tinkering with the project assigned in 1969 by his teacher, Sue Rathbun. And the result - a 9-foot-tall, 8-foot-wide homage to Weaver's native city of San Francisco incorporating 104,588 of the short pointy sticks, is attracting gawkers at "All Things Round," the new long-term show opening this weekend at the American Visionary Art Museum . (As Weaver puts it: "I wanted to make a bigger sculpture than anyone else in class.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Saturday is the day Fifi looks forward to every year. Fifi is the American Visionary Art Museum 's giant pink poodle-with-wheels, who once a year ventures outside to take part in what is clearly Baltimore's funkiest annual event, the Kinetic Sculpture Race . This year, some 36 land- and seaworthy vehicles, all strictly people-powered, will be taking part in the 15-mile race over land, sea, mud and sand. Like Fifi, some are designed to resemble animals; one of last year's crowd favorites was a hookah-smoking caterpillar.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Numbers and art typically don't mix, but both were on exhibit at the American Visionary Art Museum Monday. The Baltimore museum hosted a one-day seminar with PNC Bank on what artists need to know to survive and thrive on the business side of their craft. About 35 painters, musicians, writers and other artists attended the free crash course on budgeting and cash flow. Aspiring writer Carita Ellis-Espola was among them, driving an hour and a half from Harrisburg, Pa., to pick up financial tips.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2010
'Freedom's Sisters' Twenty remarkable African-American women from the 19th and 20th centuries, all key figures in the civil rights struggle, are profiled in this new exhibit, opening Saturday and running through Jan. 17, 2011, at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture. Through pictures, words and interative features, visitors can get to know Harriet Tubman, Mary McLeod Bethune, Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King and 16 other leading figures, both historical and contemporary.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2010
After you and your kids have had your encounter(s) with Curious George this weekend, here are five more things you might want to do in the Inner Harbor area. Maryland Science Center (601 Light St.; 410-685-2370 or mdsci.org): Dinosaurs! Amplified body sounds! Machines that make your hair stand on end! And a movie screen five stories high! What's not to love about the Maryland Science Center? And we haven't even talked about Baltimore's coolest museum gift shop. (OK, maybe the Visionary Art Museum's is better.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2010
I t was a star-spangled night at the American Visionary Art Museum, as several hundred folks gathered for the museum's annual gala. Many guests followed the suggested dress code of "broad stripes and bright stars," in honor of the museum's current exhibition, "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness." "I need a photo with Captain America," said Diana Kim, a Washington-based makeup artist, as she spotted AVAM's communications and marketing manager, Pete Hilsee, in his costume, complete with foam rubber muscles.
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