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By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
  A Visa credit card issued to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office has accumulated more than $760 in finance charge since late 2011, thanks to monthly balances that have exceeded $13,000. Four monthly statements over that span list the account as “delinquent.” Ryan O'Doherty, a spokesman for Rawlings-Blake, said Friday that part of the problem may be an administrative delay after payments are sent to the Finance Department. City Hall staff members are looking into the situation, he said.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Ocean City Police have shut down a number of henna tattoo stands on the boardwalk after the operators were found to be working in violation of their visa permits. A joint police investigation with ICE Homeland Security found 10 individuals with F-1 student visas who were selling goods on the boardwalk without proper documentation. The students were given a warning and a total of eight henna tattoo stands were shut down last weekend, police said.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
In a new ad for Visa, Ravens tough guy Ray Lewis becomes putty in the hand of a little girl in pig-tails. The 33-second spot is called "Ray Lewis's toughest interview yet. " It features Lewis at a press conference. He's is seated at the podium, a scrum of tough-looking media before him asking him uncomfortable questions. Suddenly, a hand shoots up and little girl voice shouts out, "Mr. Lewis!" "What's your favorite color?" she demands. "Purple," Lewis answers, a charmed look on his face.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
I help run a consulting services company founded and run by American citizens and headquartered in Northern Virginia. Imagine my shock when I read in The Sun ("High-tech workers with high price tags," July 27) that over half of valuable H1B visas are going to a foreign company run out of India! Why are we giving foreign companies such an advantage over local companies? What is even more galling is that my company competes against Tata Services all the time, and now I know why: Because Tata has learned how to flood the system with applications such that small companies like ours get only a fraction of the high-tech employees that we need, limiting our ability to grow which means fewer jobs for both tech and non-tech Americans at our headquarters location.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- The Orioles are confident that their five-month wait for Cuban defector Henry Urrutia, stuck in Haiti unable to play because of visa issues, will end within the next two weeks. Urrutia, a 25-year-old corner outfielder, has established residency in Haiti and has been awaiting a visa there for since the Orioles signed him to a minor league contract in July. The club paid Urrutia a $778,500 signing bonus. Fred Ferreira, the Orioles executive director for international recruiting, said that Urrutia recently made huge strides toward obtaining a visa with the help of the United States ambassador to Haiti.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
Nearly four months after signing Cuban defector Henry Urrutia, the Orioles are still waiting for the 25-year-old outfielder to officially join the organization, according to an industry source. Urrutia, who has set up residency in the Dominican Republic, continues to have difficulty obtaining a visa, an obstacle that has existed since the Orioles signed him in July. The Orioles had hoped Urrutia would arrive in time to get some minor league at bats at the Double-A level. Even after the season ended, the hope was to get Urrutia into to the team's spring training complex in Sarasota, Fla., to begin workouts.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | June 3, 2007
Will we need visas for a two-day trip to Reykjavik, Iceland? Also, can you suggest package tours and local sights? No visa is required; you can visit Iceland for up to 90 days without one. Reykjavik has plenty to see if you explore on your own: parks, museums, shopping, dining -- and its compact size makes it easy to navigate on foot. Don't miss a chance to visit a thermal pool or the Blue Lagoon, a mineral-rich hot water lagoon and spa not far from the airport. Or to dine at the Pearl (Perlan)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 9, 1994
MOSCOW -- "Come quickly to New York. Our mother is on the verge of dying," read the fax to 59-year-old Professor Georgy Grigorenko. "A brain hemorrhage has left her in a coma, and the doctors say she has only a few days left."Fax in hand, Mr. Grigorenko, whose late father was one of the most heroic of Soviet dissidents, rushed recently to the U.S. Embassy in Moscow for a visa.There, as he recalls, a consular official behind a glass window asked him his profession, how much he earned (about $40 a month)
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | January 7, 1993
NEW YORK -- China's most-wanted man, dissident Zheng Yi, arrived here yesterday after being smuggled out of the country by an underground railroad of anti-government sympathizers and spending five months waiting for a visa to enter the United States.The 45-year-old novelist was accompanied by his wife, Bei Ming, who told reporters of their 3 1/2 -year odyssey: "In the past, under the totalitarian system, it would have been impossible for a wanted person to hide for three years. But the party has lost the heart of the people."
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1996
Visa U.S.A. Inc. wants you to come downtown to dine, to shop, to play -- and, preferably, pay with plastic, not cash.The credit card giant has teamed with the Downtown Partnership to promote Baltimore, as a key sponsor in the new ads in the "See Ya 'Round Downtown" campaign.As a sponsor -- contributing more than $100,000 -- Visa's logo will appear in TV and print ads for about a year, and about 175 participating businesses will offer discounts to those using Visa cards.Visa, which recently began similar marketing efforts in a handful of other American cities, becomes the biggest single sponsor of the partnership, a nonprofit group devoted to promoting downtown and fighting crime and grime.
NEWS
By Amanda Frost | June 13, 2014
On Monday, the Supreme Court dashed the hopes of noncitizen children who had already waited years for visas to come to the United States with their families. Federal law allows immigrants to bring their unmarried, minor children with them to the U.S., but those same laws put strict annual quotas on visas, forcing applicants to wait years for a visa to become available. If the children turn 21 years old during that waiting period, they must be left behind. In its decision in Mayorkas v. Cuellar de Osorio, the high court held that these older children must get in the back of a new line and start the visa petition process all over again, denying them credit for the years they have already spent waiting.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- South Korean right-hander Suk-min Yoon has yet to pitch in a Grapefruit League game and likely won't until late next week at the earliest. Yoon is slated to spend most of next week in Canada obtaining his work visa. He will fly to Ottawa on Sunday and has an interview appointment on Monday morning. That process is expected to take a few days, but it beats the alternative of Yoon traveling back to South Korea to get his visa - which would involve lengthy travel and missing extended time in camp.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - Right-handed pitcher Alfredo Aceves left Orioles camp following Friday's workout so he could travel back to Mexico to obtain his work visa. Orioles manager Buck Showalter said he is prepared for Aceves to be gone a week, but he's been told that the process could take just five to six days. Since Aceves pitched in the Mexican Pacific League and late in the Caribbean Series for Mexico in the offseason, Showalter said he isn't worried that Aceves will fall behind.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- There's still no firm idea of when South Korean pitcher Suk-min Yoon will officially be a member of the Orioles, but the club is trying to speed up the process. Yoon was in Sarasota on Friday, took his physical and left. The club has not yet officially announced a deal with him. As of late Friday night, Yoon has not yet officially passed his physical, but initial reviews were positive, according to a club source. According to a report out of South Korea by Hoonki Min for Daum Media, the Orioles are trying to expedite Yoon's visa by applying for it in Canada.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 30, 2013
Among the most annoying calculations in modern life are those that project how much money you could save over the course of a year if you did something simple, like give up your daily Starbucks. It is always these modest pleasures that are targeted for elimination in the name of saving. It is never something like, "You could save $10,000 every year if you gave up buying fine jewelry. " Or "You could save $100,000 every year if you lived in a tent in someone else's yard. " Most of us working stiffs were already feeling guilty about what we spend on eating lunch out. Not that any of us have time to do much of that in the do-more-with-fewer-people workplace.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
  A Visa credit card issued to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office has accumulated more than $760 in finance charge since late 2011, thanks to monthly balances that have exceeded $13,000. Four monthly statements over that span list the account as “delinquent.” Ryan O'Doherty, a spokesman for Rawlings-Blake, said Friday that part of the problem may be an administrative delay after payments are sent to the Finance Department. City Hall staff members are looking into the situation, he said.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
A 49-year-old British citizen who federal officials said promoted all-night rave parties is to be deported before the end of the week after U.S. Immigration and Naturalization agents arrested him for violating a visa program, officials said.Raymond Paul Francis, who lived in the first block of Winehurst Road in Catonsville, was arrested Friday by INS agents after an investigation sparked by tips from county police officers in the metropolitan area.Officials say he violated the Visa Waiver Pilot Program, a federal program that allows foreign nationals to remain in the United States for 90 days without a formal visa.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 11, 2000
MIAMI -- U.S. diplomat Thomas P. Carroll apparently had no clue that he was a target of an investigation when he landed in Miami last month on a flight from the Caribbean nation of Guyana, where he had been posted for two years. When he met that day at Miami International Airport with his successor as chief of the U.S. Embassy's nonimmigrant visa section, it was unlikely that Carroll knew he was being taped. His pitch to his replacement, according to an affidavit filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago, was as simple as it was chilling: "Carroll asked [his colleague]
NEWS
May 4, 2013
In their commentary, Zainab Choudry and Saqib Ali ("Don't let Israel discriminate," April 30) objected to Senate Bill 462 (the U.S.-Israel Strategic Partnership Act of 2013) introduced recently in the U.S. Senate that advocates Israel's right to deny entry into its country of certain people. Therefore, according to them, this bill would allow Israel to "discriminate against select groups of Americans, including Americans who expressed criticism of its policies. " Ms. Choudry and Mr. Ali also misguidedly disapproved of U.S. Sen. Benjamin Cardin for supporting the bill.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
Commentators Zainab Choudry and Saqib Ali complain that Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin co-sponsored legislation to extend a visa waiver program to Israel ("Don't let Israel discriminate," April 30). The waiver program currently allows citizens of 37 European and other countries - including Japan, Australia and South Korea - to travel in the United States for up to 90 days without a visa. The writers claim the legislation would let Israel dispense with a "reciprocity" provision so it could "discriminate against Americans based on their ethnicity or religion" - particularly against Arab Americans and Muslim Americans.
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