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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Profectus BioSciences Inc., a Baltimore-based biotechnology company, said Wednesday that it won a $5.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to support the development of a vaccine for a pair of contagious and deadly viruses that the U.S. government has classified as biological and agricultural threats. The viruses are found in other parts of the world. The viruses — Nipah and Hendra — are closely related and cause respiratory and encephalitic disease in humans and animals.
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HEALTH
Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An American physician exposed to the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone is expected to be admitted to the National Institutes of Health, officials at the Bethesda-based agency said Saturday in a statement. NIH officials said that the patient, who was volunteering in an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, is expected to be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for observation as well as to take part in a clinical study. Officials offered no additional information about the patient. "Out of an abundance of caution, the patient will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center's special clinical studies unit that is specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities and is staffed by infectious diseases and critical care specialists," NIH officials said.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
Faced with the threats of viruses like H1N1 influenza and SARS in recent years, scientists including the University of Maryland's Dr. Robert Gallo sought a way to prepare for future outbreaks - founding the Baltimore-based Global Virus Network in 2011. The network aims to address challenges in virus treatment and to prepare the world for potential pandemics, doing so through research, training and advocacy, said its president, Sharon Hrynkow. Organizations like Gallo's Institute of Human Virology at the university's School of Medicine, and others around the world collaborate through the network.
NEWS
Sheila Durant | September 14, 2014
Like many Americans, we in Maryland have watched and listened to the graphic daily news stories chronicling Ebola's escalating devastation in Liberia and other West African nations. Our hearts break as we witness the deaths of innocent Liberians and courageous health-care providers. And we wonder: How can one of the world's poorest countries, whose people and infrastructure remain devastated from over a decade of civil war, hold up against the ferocity of the worst Ebola epidemic ever?
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 1996
My pediatrician gives our son a flu shot every fall, . but this year he has been sick already. I know the flu vaccine is made new each year. Is it just not good this year?"
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | February 27, 1991
Computer viruses have not been in the headlines lately, but that does not mean they have gone away. They tend to pop up around days such as Halloween or Friday the 13th or Easter, because many of them are timed to lie dormant until a certain date.Viruses, little snippets of rogue code hidden in legitimate application programs that spread by reproducing themselves, are actually very rare.The average home or small business personal computer user has about as much chance of getting infected with a virus as of getting hit by lightning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 27, 2001
Is there no sure inoculation for all these computer viruses? Seems not. But the Web can tell you a lot about them, why they exist, and what to do (and not do) about them. CERT On any given day, this site can set you quivering with fear over the latest viruses, worms, Trojan horses and other malicious computer attacks. CERT means "computer emergency response team," we think. We couldn't find it spelled out on the site. www.cert.org/ VIRUS FAQS Don't know the Morris worm from the ILOVEYOU virus?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Scientists say they have the first direct evidence that viruses can mutate and become deadly because of nutritional deficiencies in the hosts they infect.In their experiments, researchers found that a human virus normally harmless to mice mutated and became a heart-damaging agent in mice suffering from a nutritional deficiency. Once changed, they said, the virus also was able to infect and damage the hearts of nutritionally well-balanced mice.This is the first time that a nutritional deficiency in a host has been shown to alter viruses to make them permanently more virulent, the scientists said in a report published in the May 1 issue of the journal Nature Medicine.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Staff Writer | March 9, 1992
A few years ago I made a fool of myself by writing all kinds of purple prose about a Columbus Day virus that was supposed to pop up and destroy the hard disks of thousands of computers around the world.As it turned out, something like 17 cases of Columbus Day virus mayhem were actually confirmed, which was undoubtedly less than the number of PC's trashed that day by klutzes who stumbled into their desks and knocked their computers onto the floor.For that reason, I resolved not to join the hysteria over the so-called Michelangelo virus, which was triggered on Friday, the great artist's birthday.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 8, 1995
The NBC promotional campaign for "Robin Cook's Virus" calls the made-for-TV movie, which is based on Cook's best seller, "Outbreak," timely and cutting edge.The film, an apocalyptic vision about a deadly virus falling into the wrong hands and spreading like wildfire around the world, wants to be a high-tech, new age version of the killer bees story: They're coming, better get ready!But in reality "Virus," airing at 9 tonight on WBAL (Channel 11), is more like low-tech and middle-aged.It's one of those films that for two hours exploits collective fears about such unknowns as flesh-eating viruses.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State health officials reported Thursday they have confirmed the first case of West Nile Virus in Maryland for the year. The infected adult lives in the suburbs of Washington. The virus has also been detected in a Washington-area horse, and in special mosquito traps placed in Harford, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the human case was not unexpected - there were 16 reported cases last year. But they reminded people to take precautions by avoiding areas where mosquitoes are prevalent, covering their skin with clothes and hats, using insect repellent, and if possible, avoiding outdoor activities during mosquitoes' most active times at dusk and dawn.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
Faced with the threats of viruses like H1N1 influenza and SARS in recent years, scientists including the University of Maryland's Dr. Robert Gallo sought a way to prepare for future outbreaks - founding the Baltimore-based Global Virus Network in 2011. The network aims to address challenges in virus treatment and to prepare the world for potential pandemics, doing so through research, training and advocacy, said its president, Sharon Hrynkow. Organizations like Gallo's Institute of Human Virology at the university's School of Medicine, and others around the world collaborate through the network.
NEWS
By D. A. Henderson | August 6, 2014
The only known stocks of the deadly smallpox virus are now kept in two designated research laboratories, one in Russia and one in the United States. This has troubled many who believe that destruction of the virus would provide greater assurance that it would never again threaten the world. Some scientists, however, insist that the intact smallpox virus is essential for their studies of new vaccines - even though the vaccines themselves are entirely different viruses. The decision to destroy the virus has thus been debated and postponed repeatedly in the World Health Assembly over the past 15 years.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit that officially opened today in Washington is as notable for what isn't on the agenda as for what is. The meeting between President Barack Obama and more than 40 African heads of state has been billed as forum for talks on security issues, foreign investment and economic development on the continent. But so far, at least, the recent outbreak of deadly Ebola virus in three African nations has remained absent from the official agenda. Mr. Obama needs to take this opportunity to strengthen cooperation between the U.S. and its African partners in efforts to bring the epidemic under control and provide the resources needed to prevent its spread.
NEWS
Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Public health officials have just one tactic to battle the unrelenting Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa - quarantine - but as the disease continues to spread, scientists in Maryland are among those close to discovering other weapons. Baltimore companies Profectus BioSciences and Paragon Bioservices, as well as researchers at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick in Frederick and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have been part of efforts that have shown a handful of Ebola vaccine candidates are effective in monkeys.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
State health officials are urging Marylanders to be wary of mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile virus and, now, the dengue-like virus chikungunya - raising concerns after it was reported in a Florida man Thursday. The chikungunya case is believed to be the first that was contracted in the U.S.; other cases had been reported in people who had recently traveled to areas where the virus is prevalent. That is raising concern over the possible spread of the virus, which is not usually fatal but can cause fever and debilitating joint pain and cannot be treated.
NEWS
By Gareth Cook and Gareth Cook,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 2004
Scientists have discovered how a family of dangerous viruses invades healthy cells, a finding that promises new treatments for dengue fever, West Nile and other diseases that infect more than 50 million people every year. The dengue virus, which sparks severe fevers and can cause internal bleeding, and the West Nile virus, carried across the United States by birds, are both emerging diseases in the Americas. But scientists have not understood how they infect cells once they invade the body.
BUSINESS
By Mary Madison and Mary Madison,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 3, 1992
Since the Persian Gulf war, computer experts and military strategists have been toying with a chilling new concept in warfare: Knocking out an enemy's weapons by ruining his computer systems with viruses designed to throw off or reverse the commands originally programmed.Such a concept could reduce an enemy to helplessness quickly.In 1990, the U.S. Army, acting through the Defense Department and Small Business Administration, solicited bids on a contract for feasibility studies on the idea.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 6, 2014
Seasonal flu vaccine is only effective if the right virus strains of influenza are included. So the National Institutes of Health are tapping researchers at Johns Hopkins University and four other institutions to find better ways of identifying what's circulating. The result of the effort could be better protection from the flu, which kills thousands annually, and better preparation for an emerging pandemic, researchers said. Hopkins and the other institutions will contribute to NIH's existing Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance with the goal of controlling and lessening the impacts of influenza.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Orioles left-hander Brian Matusz was back in uniform Sunday morning and back on the mound later in the day. Matusz missed the first two games of the series against the Toronto Blue Jays with a virus that caused him to spend time in a local hospital Friday afternoon. He had to receive IV fluids and wasn't released until later that night. "I think that was just to get on IVs, and make sure everything was OK, and make sure that it wasn't a stomach problem," Matusz said. "It was more precautionary.
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